Academic Library Workers See Furloughs, Reduced Hours as Schools Anticipate Budget Cuts

Academic Library Workers See Furloughs, Reduced Hours as Schools Anticipate Budget Cuts

As they anticipate hits from lowered enrollment and decreased endowments, as well as declines in state funding for public universities and community colleges, and potential rollbacks of money that has already been authorized, academic institutions have begun hiring freezes and reductions, including furloughs, layoffs, and reduced hours for non-tenured faculty and staff. Many campus libraries are seeing reductions in workforce that threaten to affect their ability to serve students, faculty, and researchers.

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Reopening Libraries: Public Libraries Keep Their Options Open

Erica Freudenberger, Jun 25, 2020
How do you reopen a library with no guidelines or best practices to work from? That’s the question public leaders and staff are considering as library buildings gradually open across the country.

Make the Right Call | Editorial

Meredith Schwartz, Jul 06, 2020
In many towns across the United States, seeing members of the police in the public library is common-place. Off-duty officers moonlight as library security guards. Library programs like “Coffee with a Cop” aim to help the police develop closer bonds of trust with the community. And police are often called to deal with behavioral issues or threats to patron or staff safety. But as the past weeks of protest after the police killing of George Floyd, among others, make plain, for a substantial portion of patrons and staff, the presence of the police is itself a threat.

Rise of the Monsters: Top Horror Titles and Trends Coming This Season

Becky Spratford, Jul 08, 2020
Horror and dark fiction are trending in a big way. Here are the titles and trends to keep an eye on in the coming months, including a downloadable list of every book mentioned.

ALA’s Virtual Reality | ALA Virtual 2020

LJ Staff, Jul 06, 2020
Held online from June 24–26, ALA Virtual—Community Through Connection saw 7,349 attendees and 651 exhibitors and featured more than 50 sessions, live chats with authors and speakers, more than 75 publisher and exhibitor sessions on new titles, a virtual exhibit floor with more than 600 participating exhibitors, 11 featured speakers, and a Swag-a-Palooza with hundreds of free items.

Alexandra Chassanoff, Apr 12, 2018
During the week of March 19–23 MIT Libraries convened experts from across disciplines and domains to identify and address grand challenges in the scholarly communication and information science landscape.
Mirco Tonin, Jan 03, 2018
Suppose a librarian receives an email from a man named Greg Walsh, wanting to become a cardholder or simply inquiring about the open hours. Would the librarian reply? And, if so, would the reply be polite, including for instance some form of salutation, such as “Hello” or “Good morning”? Does your answer change if the guy is called Tyrone Washington? Is a librarian treating Jake Mueller differently from DeShawn Jackson?
LJ Reviews, Apr 11, 2018
A detailed look at pain management implementing the use of medical cannabis rather than opioids; A complex look at the issue of opioid abuse backed up with research and first hand stories; A valuable addition to the conversation about addiction filled with case studies illustrating the complexities of the disease
Mahnaz Dar, Jan 20, 2018
Editor Sarah Janssen discusses editing The World Almanac in an age where being attuned to "fake news" is especially vital.
Gary Price, Jul 13, 2020
From the Federal Trade Commission: The Federal Trade Commission launched a new tool that explores data about problems military consumers may experience in the marketplace. For the first time, data about reports the FTC has received from active duty service members and veterans will be available online in an interactive dashboard at ftc.gov/explore data. The military […]
Gary Price, Jul 13, 2020
From the National Endowment For the Humanities: As part of these grant awards, ten university presses received NEH CARES funding to sustain academic publishing efforts. These grants will support the editing and publication of new books and journals on humanities topics, facilitate scholarly communication, and enable the digitization of scholarly ebooks to make humanities research […]
Gary Price, Jul 13, 2020
The following paper was published today by Scientific Data. Title A Dataset Describing Data Discovery and Reuse Practices in Research Author Kathleen Gregory Data Archiving and Networked Services Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts & Sciences Source Scientific Data (Sci Data) 7,232 (2020). DOI: 10.1038/s41597-020-0569-5 Abstract This paper presents a dataset produced from the largest known […]
Gary Price, Jul 13, 2020
From AAP: The Association of American Publishers (AAP) today released its StatShot report for May 2020 reflecting reported revenue for all tracked categories, including Trade (consumer publications), K-12 Instructional Materials, Higher Education Course Materials, Professional Publishing, and University Presses. Total revenues across all categories for May 2020 were approximately $1.0 billion, a decline of 12.1% […]
Erica Freudenberger, Jun 25, 2020
How do you reopen a library with no guidelines or best practices to work from? That’s the question public leaders and staff are considering as library buildings gradually open across the country.

Meredith Schwartz, Jul 01, 2020
With some libraries reopening for at least limited services, and many others doing curbside pickup, face masks are a necessity for library workers and patrons alike. These library- and book-themed offerings can make it fun and show your library love all over your face.

Emily Joy Oomen, Jun 23, 2020
Most public libraries stopped distributing materials during the pandemic to stop the spread of the coronavirus. But that doesn’t mean they stopped distributing anything. Some leveraged their expertise at getting resources into the hands of patrons to help those suddenly struggling with the bare essentials of life: food, diapers, the means to clean up, or a place to sleep.

Gary Price, Jun 22, 2020
IMLS: In the first phase of a project to disseminate and develop science-based information about how materials can be handled to mitigate exposure to staff and visitors, scientists have found that the virus SARS-CoV-2 that causes COVID-19 is not detectable on five common library materials after three days.

LJ Staff,  Jul 13, 2020
This July, LJ launches #LJReads, a community-wide read; our first book will be Curtis Sittenfeld's Rodham.

Neal Wyatt,  Jul 13, 2020
Too Much and Never Enough by Mary Trump leads holds this week, even as a judge continues to prevent Dr. Trump from prompting or discussing her work. Colson Whitehead wins the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction for The Nickel Boys. The Shirley Jackson Awards are out. The Book of X by Sarah Rose Etter wins for best novel. People’s "Book of the Week" is Gatecrasher by Ben Widdicombe. The National Book Awards will be all digital in 2020 due to the pandemic. The ceremony will take place, online, on Nov. 18.

Severn House,  Jul 13, 2020
In 1988, Qiu Xiaolong came to St. Louis, planning to stay for one year at Washington University to research T. S. Eliot, whose poems he’d translated. Following political upheaval in China, Xiaolong decided to make his home in America.

Lisa Peet,  Jul 13, 2020
As they anticipate hits from lowered enrollment and decreased endowments, as well as declines in state funding for public universities and community colleges, and potential rollbacks of money that has already been authorized, academic institutions have begun hiring freezes and reductions, including furloughs, layoffs, and reduced hours for non-tenured faculty and staff. Many campus libraries are seeing reductions in workforce that threaten to affect their ability to serve students, faculty, and researchers.

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