Griffiths, Elly

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PREMIUM

The Locked Room

The mystery is solid, but it’s Ruth’s discoveries about her family history that make this installment one series fans shouldn’t miss.
PREMIUM

The Locked Room

Readers new to this series and longtime fans will not be able to put this down, as long as they aren’t put off by the pandemic story line.
PREMIUM

The Postscript Murders

Reminiscent of the work of Golden Age writers like Agatha Christie or Dorothy L. Sayers, Griffiths’s latest will be a hit with listeners who enjoyed Richard Osman’s The Thursday Murder Club or Anthony Horowitz’s Magpie Murders.
PREMIUM

The Night Hawks

A strong addition to the series; recommended for readers who enjoy a mystery investigated by relatable characters.
PREMIUM

The Postscript Murders

Readers of Griffiths’s Edgar Award–winning The Stranger Diaries, or her “Ruth Galloway” mysteries, will welcome this book with a diverse cast of well-developed characters. However, the story drags at times. Richard Osman’s The Thursday Murder Club is a stronger pick for those looking for unusual amateur sleuths.
PREMIUM

Now You See Them

The fifth in Griffiths’s “Magic Men” series (The Vanishing Box) is written with a lighter touch and quirkier characters than her “Ruth Galloway” archaeological mysteries. Nevertheless, it’s a highly entertaining read with a spot-on portrayal of the manners and mores of the 1960s. [See Prepub Alert, 3/25/19.]
PREMIUM

The Stone Circle

Fans of the series will be delighted to catch up with Ruth and Nelson as the mysteries wind their way to satisfying solutions. [See Prepub Alert, 11/5/18.]

The Stranger Diaries

Griffiths's ("Ruth Galloway" and "Magic Men" series) first stand-alone novel is a modern gothic that updates and plays with genre conventions to great effect. Highly recommended for fans of British mysteries and classic whodunits. [See Prepub Alert, 9/10/18.]
PREMIUM

The Vanishing Box

The fourth entry in the "Magic Men" series (The Blood Card) presents a fascinating look behind the curtain of 1950s showbiz as well as an engaging mystery, especially when DI Stephens and his sergeants are involved. [See Prepub Alert, 4/19/18.]
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