C. Diane Scharper

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PREMIUM

Normal Distance

Ultimately, Gabbert writes her memoir-like poems around quotidian events such as awakening from sleep, going shopping, and contemplating boredom, loneliness, or life during the pandemic, interspersing snappy comments like “Paper or plastic?” with profundities. All of which leaves readers on edge, which is Gabbert’s intention.

Beyond Belief: Poems

In Koethe’s relaxed, prose-like style, long sentences meander until his thoughts, taking a philosophical turn, dead end in a reverberant image or a metaphor like the enigmatic smile in “Daddy,” one of the best poems in this striking collection.
PREMIUM

The Place One Is

Slowly drawing readers into the subject with two or three scenes, Ronk doesn’t stop until all eyes and ears are opened to the narrator’s circumstance. Then, in the best of these poems, she makes the scene universal, taking readers by surprise as she launches into the stratosphere--which, as one can imagine, is breathtaking.
PREMIUM

Requeening: Poems

These highly descriptive poems evoke a dreamlike state, one that is quick-moving and evocative, temporarily erasing actual and imagined boundaries.
PREMIUM

What To Miss When: Poems

The power in this collection lies in the way Stein serves her feelings on ice. Although she never mentions T. S. Eliot, her writing style is influenced by his notion that poetry is not a turning loose of emotion but an escape from it.

PREMIUM

Second Story: Poems

This book is not exactly a swan song, but in many places it feels that way. What keeps it from being heavy are Duhamel’s word play, breezy free association, and chatty poetic style. For all libraries.
PREMIUM

July

Figurative language, especially alliteration, repetition, and metaphor, races through these pages like the balls in a pinball machine, gathering energy and grace. For a wide range of readers.
PREMIUM

Index of Women

As her impressions flow together, they add a surreal atmosphere, suggestive of art by Toulouse-Lautrec
PREMIUM

frank: sonnets

All in all, there’s an awareness of the poet being separated--suggesting that she’s writing the poem as a way to connect to absent loved ones--perhaps her son who lives far away from her, or her former lover, or departed family members, or even her own self. But is she? It’s hard to pin down the meaning of a Seuss poem, which adds a certain pleasing sense of mystery to the best work here.

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