Beth Andersen

108 Articles

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PREMIUM

The Making of Her

Jiwa offers a cautionary tale about the bruising, explosive power of secrets kept for far too long. Her fully realized, sympathetic, often desperately imperfect characters make for an irresistible read.
PREMIUM

Signal Fires

Creator of the popular podcast Family Secrets, acclaimed novelist/memoirist Shapiro (Inheritance) writes with compassion and a deep understanding of the damage that secrets wreak. Shapiro’s first novel in 15 years was well worth the wait.
PREMIUM

The Reservoir

Inspired by Duchovny’s self-reflection while sequestered in his own aerie above Central Park at the height of the pandemic, this work is provocative, challenging, and not without its moments of dark humor.
PREMIUM

Delphi

Pollard’s deft inclusion of all the pandemic’s practical and political challenges--masks, vaccines, social distancing, the strain on shared home WiFi networks, long separations from aging parents, the 2020 U.S. presidential election, and January 6--is wrapped in the inventive framework of prophecies. Irresistible and also oddly reassuring for all who have come through (so far) to the other side of COVID’s miseries.
PREMIUM

Touch

Olafsson’s treatment of the vast cultural chasm between Icelander Kristófer, and Miko, shaped by the bombing of Hiroshima shortly before she was born, brings suspense and heartache to the reader.

Remarkably Bright Creatures

Poet and short story writer Van Pelt has written an irresistibly wonderful, warm, funny, heartbreaking first novel, full of gentle people (and one octopus) bravely powering through their individual scars left by lives that have beaten them up but have not brought them down.
PREMIUM

Seven Steeples

Award-winning novelist Baume’s gifts as a visual artist can be seen not only in the poetry of her majestic words but also in her creative use of spacing that enhances this lovely novel that is made for this time in history of pandemic-triggered isolation.
PREMIUM

Mercy Street

Haigh (Baker Towers), an award-winning, New York Times best-selling author, holds her readers captive from first to last page with an unflinching look at the human tragedies that lie behind every layer of the never-ending controversial national abortion battle. Her piercing character portrayals and eavesdrop-quality dialogue will have readers asking for her previous works.

The School for Good Mothers

Chan’s stunning debut could not be timelier, leaving no stone unturned in its allusion to the real-life legal assaults constraining women today. Part-dystopian, part-prescient, impossible to put down and impossible to forget.

 

Correction Notice: In the original review LJ incorrectly named Frida’s daughter Muriel. The character’s name is Harriet. We regret the error. 

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