Atlantic Monthly

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PREMIUM

When the Stars Begin To Fall: Overcoming Racism and Renewing the Promise of America

Johnson supports his argument with a mix of stories, both personal and historical, which brings a personal aspect to a work that can be academic at times. While the book covers the same territory as recent works by Isabel Wilkerson and Ibram X. Kendi, Johnson’s particular point-of-view makes his call to action feel like a patriotic duty.
PREMIUM

Resistance

Thought-provoking elements fail to cohere in this underwhelming graphic novel.
PREMIUM

Transient Desires

Brunetti continues to delight, and this will do well in libraries where the series has proved popular.
PREMIUM

The Bookseller of Florence: The Story of the Manuscripts That Illuminated the Renaissance

Standout narrative nonfiction that will engage bibliophiles and readers who enjoy historical nonfiction.
PREMIUM

The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware

O’Donnell has made a career of shedding light on underreported yet interesting incidents in American wars, but his writing often veers into hagiography. This book will attract Revolutionary War enthusiasts, but it pales in comparison to Winning Independence, by John Ferling, which offers a comprehensive look at pivotal moments of the war.
PREMIUM

Endpapers: A Family Story of Books, War, Escape, and Home

Overall, this fascinating, sometimes brutal, and in a few minor instances, rambling narrative will grasp the attention of readers interested in the Holocaust and modern German history.
PREMIUM

Wild Minds: The Artists and Rivalries That Inspired the Golden Age of Animation

An entertaining and revealing look into the dawn of a revolutionary art form.
PREMIUM

Breath Taking: The Power, Fragility, and Future of Our Extraordinary Lungs

Readers of Siddhartha Mukherjee and Atul Gawande will appreciate Stephen’s writing. Blending science writing and medical reporting, this is a detailed, yet accessible account that will engage anyone concerned with their respiratory health
PREMIUM

Midnight Train to Prague

In her second novel (following 1998’s Breathing Underwater and two story collections), Canadian writer Windley delivers well-researched descriptions of daily life in 1920s–40s Eastern Europe that will appeal to readers who enjoy immersive scene setting. The number of characters and the frequent jumps between them give the book a slightly crowded feel that is particularly noticeable in the first half, but the second half is more consistently engaging. Recommended for those readers who can’t get enough of World War II historical fiction, particularly for those interested in civilians’ experiences in Eastern Europe.
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