Wilson, Edward O

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PREMIUM

The Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books: Christopher Columbus, His Son, and the Quest To Build the World's Greatest Library

Recommended for bibliophiles and history buffs alike. [See Prepub Alert, 9/10/18.]
PREMIUM

Genesis: The Deep Origin of Societies

A challenging read best suited for specialists in the fields of evolutionary biology and sociobiology. Popular science readers should turn to the author's more accessible work on the same topic: The Social Conquest of Earth.
PREMIUM

The Origins of Creativity

Short and digestible in spurts, this would be a welcome addition to most collections. ["This book will resonate with science enthusiasts who appreciate that a life worth living means embracing more than the material world": LJ 8/17 review of the Liveright: Norton hc.]
PREMIUM

The Origins of Creativity

A rallying cry for uniting scientific and humanistic inquiry to answer big questions, this book will resonate with science enthusiasts who appreciate that a life worth living means embracing more than the material world. [See Prepub Alert, 4/10/17.]
PREMIUM

Shakespeare in Swahililand: In Search of a Global Poet

This readable account shows that Shakespeare is universal because his work can be read in all types of environments, reflecting eternal truths and current conditions worldwide.
PREMIUM

Half-Earth: Our Planet's Fight for Life

This would be a good place to start for anyone interested in gaining an understanding of biodiversity and the intricate web of interdependence of species.
PREMIUM

The Meaning of Human Existence

Recommended for those interested in the scientific view of everyday life. ["This book will be of interest to the general reader," read the review of the Liveright: Norton hc, LJ 10/1/14.]
PREMIUM

The Meaning of Human Existence

The importance of preserving the biodiversity that gave rise to humanity matters to Wilson, a point he emphasizes by cautioning us against engineering the planet exclusively to serve human needs, a gloomy dystopia he refers to as the "Age of Loneliness." This book will be of interest to the general reader.
PREMIUM

Letters to a Young Scientist

Although the title and small format may suggest the book as a gift for graduates, it ought to be on the shelves of all high school and public libraries, as well as some undergraduate collections.

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