Thomas L. Batten

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Bad Weekend

With this Eisner Award–winning volume, expanding stories first serialized in the “Criminal” series, the incomparable team of Brubaker and Phillips (My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies; The Fade Out) once again prove themselves among the best creators of crime fiction in any genre.
PREMIUM

The Green Lantern. Vol. 1: Intergalactic Lawman

Sharp’s (The Brave and The Bold: Batman and Wonder Woman) illustrations suggest legendary comics artist Neal Adams paying homage to surrealist painter H.R. Giger (or vice versa). Morrison’s (Batman by Grant Morrison Omnibus, Vol. 2) script mixes police procedural thriller plot points with mind-boggling sf concepts. Not to be missed. Collecting Issues 1–6 of a new ongoing series.

Rusty Brown

Masterfully illustrated, brilliantly designed, and bursting with compassion for characters united by time and space who nonetheless feel isolated owing to fear and shame, this is without a doubt one of the most exciting releases of the year. [an editor’s pick, see “Fall Fireworks,” p. 23.]

The End of the World

An idiosyncratic and strangely poignant marvel from a true visionary
PREMIUM

Heavy Liquid

Drawing inspiration from noir films, cyberpunk, manga, and the world of high fashion, this work has a influenced an entire generation of cartoonists but remarkably still feels fresh today

Bad Gateway

Hanselmann (One More Year) is a phenomenally talented, internationally renowned cartoonist who switches between laugh-out-loud absurdist humor and startlingly raw scenes of extreme sadness from one panel to the next, and this is his finest, funniest, and most mature work to date
PREMIUM

The Tenderness of Stones

A profoundly moving and curiously playful meditation on the complex swirl of emotions and sense of having entered a surreal world often experienced by caregivers. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s Graphic Novel Spotlight, “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

Frogcatchers

Readers familiar with the themes that the prolific Lemire routinely explores might find the twists and turns here a tad predictable, but the author tells his story with such passion and empathy for his characters that it’s hard not to get swept up and genuinely moved by the ending nonetheless. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s Graphic Novels Spotlight, “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

Hot Comb

Readers are sure to find these stories moving and illuminating, and may be shocked to discover, given the talent on display, that this is Flower’s first book

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