Stephanie Sendaula

186 Articles

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PREMIUM

Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery & Abolition

As a whole, this collection showcases the vastness of Black thinking and writing, and nicely complements works by Martha S. Jones and Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers. Complete with a list of suggestions for further reading, this winning anthology is a must for all interested in Black history, but unsure where to start.
PREMIUM

Rodney Scott’s World of BBQ: Every Day Is a Good Day

With humor and candor, Scott brings readers into his home and invites them to stay a while. A standout collection for fans of BBQ.
PREMIUM

Speak, Okinawa

A can’t-miss memoir that will stay with readers after they finish the last page.
PREMIUM

In Search of The Color Purple: The Story of an American Masterpiece

Tillet writes a necessary account of how Walker’s centering the lives of Black women has transformed literature. Accessibly written, this book will engage both longtime fans and those new to Walker’s writing.

The Queens’ English: The LGBTQIA+ Dictionary of Lingo and Colloquial Phrases

A must for better understanding queer culture, especially the contributions of Black and Latinx trans people to pop culture at large.

Simply: Easy Everyday Dishes from the Bestselling Author of Persiana

A must-have collection of innovative and flavorful, yet satisfying meals for all occasions.

Flight of the Diamond Smugglers: A Tale of Pigeons, Obsession, and Greed Along Coastal South Africa

Frank writes a fascinating story of grief and history that will draw readers in from the first page. Must-read narrative nonfiction.

PREMIUM

We Had a Little Real Estate Problem: The Unheralded Story of Native Americans & Comedy

With no real comparison book, this well-documented history, though uneven at times, should spark interest and future research.

Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619–2019

With YA crossover appeal, this is an essential collection proving that African American history is American history, and that the two cannot be studied separately.

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