Sally Bissell

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LJ Talks with New PEN America President Ayad Akhtar

PREMIUM

A Girl Is a Body of Water

A recipient of the Windham-Campbell Prize for Fiction and the Kwani Manuscript Project for her first novel, Kintu, UK-based Makumbi is a mesmerizing storyteller, slowly pulling readers in with a captivating cast of multifaceted characters and a soupçon of magical realism guaranteed to appeal to fans of Isabel Allende, Julia Alvarez, or Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing.

Like a Bird

In lustrous, lyrical language, multifaceted artist Róisín has written an ode to the joy and healing power of self-love. This powerful novel is highly recommended.

Homeland Elegies

The personal is political in this beautiful, intense elegy for an America that often goes awry while still offering hope. [See Prepub Alert, 2/24/20.]

PREMIUM

Heaven and Earth

As he did in his Premio Strega–winning debut, The Solitude of Prime Numbers, Giordano deftly mines the vast, mysterious territory of childhood, illuminating how our first relationships and loves inform the adults we become. A big, delicious mash-up of a novel blending the vividly drawn friendships of Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan stories with the urgency of Richard Powers’s acts of ecoterrorism in The Overstory. [See Prepub Alert, 1/15/20.]

Transcendent Kingdom

Though it’s a departure from her gorgeous historical debut, Homegoing, winner of the NBCC's John Leonard Prize, Gyasi's contemporary novel of a woman’s struggle for connection in a place where science and faith are at odds is a piercingly beautiful tale of love and forgiveness.

PREMIUM

Little Family

In a work less harrowing but no less effective than Radiance of Tomorrow, Beah continues to speak eloquently to the impact of colonialism on generations of African children for whom freedom is merely an illusion. [See Prepub Alert, 10/14/19.]

The Death of Vivek Oji

The plaudits for Emezi’s first novel, Freshwater (NYPL Young Lions, Lambda Literary, and Center for Fiction’s First Novel honors), did not overstate the case. Following Pet, a finalist for the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature, this achingly beautiful probe into the challenges of living fully as a nonbinary human being, is an illuminating read.

The Night Watchman

National Book Award winner Erdrich once again calls upon her considerable storytelling skills to elucidate the struggles of generations of Native people to retain their cultural identity and their connection to the land. [See Prepub Alert, 9/9/19.]
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