Randall M. Miller

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PREMIUM

To Address You as My Friend: African Americans’ Letters to Abraham Lincoln

These letters provide telling examples of the ways that Black Americans, free and enslaved, proactively and persistently sought liberty by word and deed and laid claim to the rights and responsibilities of citizenship: a truth as pertinent and pressing in the 21st century as during Lincoln’s day.
PREMIUM

The Generals’ Civil War: What Their Memoirs Can Teach Us Today

Cushman never fully demonstrates his argument that Civil War memoirs led to the emphasis on individual actors, rather than the collective people, as the touchstones of Americans’ reflections on their “self” thereafter. Regardless, this deep analysis of the process of creating and selling the memoir’s persona and form adds new insight to the subject of the Civil War memoir. A fascinating tour de force of scholarship.
PREMIUM

A Second Reckoning: Race, Injustice, and the Last Hanging in Annapolis

 Calling for ongoing systemic change, this short book packs a big punch and will resonate with many in the 21st century.

The Essential Kerner Commission Report

The Kerner Commission Report was in its day a tour de force of investigation and recommendation, with a sense of urgency that still echoes in this edition. What was true in 1967 remains so in the 21st century, and this version of the report might point the way toward a national resolution, if the United States summons the will and wherewithal to make change.

Meade at Gettysburg: A Study in Command

An instructive book about Civil War generalship that will engage and inform anyone interested in the dynamics of command from the perspective of those in charge.

I’ve Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land

Roberts’s original book will cause historians to reexamine generalities about Indigenous and Black people in Oklahoma and their empowerment and identity; and to extend the story of Reconstruction and its aftermath westward in time and space

Until Justice Be Done: America’s First Civil Rights Movement, from the Revolution to Reconstruction

At a time when definitions of citizenship and civil rights are again under assault, Masur’s careful accounting of the ways Americans came to understand such terms provides an informed perspective to appreciate that such concepts never were, and thus never are, self-evident. They require due diligence and vigilance to secure and sustain at all levels of government. An essential book.

A Contest of Civilizations: Exposing the Crisis of American Exceptionalism in the Civil War Era

Lang’s tour de force is a compelling and essential read. He shows how Americans’ self-anointed claim of exceptionalism was, and is, premised on a supposed consensus on liberty’s meaning that never was and perhaps will never be. Vital reading for all.
PREMIUM

The Scourge of War: The Life of William Tecumseh Sherman

Sometimes argumentative but always insightful, this study of Sherman ranks among the best renderings of the man and the conduct of the Civil War, and will help readers reconsider Sherman's character and the discipline necessary to succeed in war.

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