Liz French

208 Articles

Last 30 days
Last 6 months
Last 12 months
Last 24 months
Specific Dates
PREMIUM

While Justice Sleeps

Although it’s not successful as a thriller, the book’s plethora of women role models, including a chief justice, and its “inside DC” look at political skullduggery make Abrams’s novel a well-informed political and legal narrative.
PREMIUM

Astrid Sees All

Standiford’s novel is worth reading for its dark and dazzling depiction of New York’s “last bohemia” and believable youthful recklessness and angst. But too many plot lines and an unconvincing, overstuffed climax result in a work that falls short.

Death of a Showman

With a spirited, intelligent heroine; pitch-perfect descriptions of pre–World War I New York; and believable characters, Fredericks’s latest historical mystery is a delight.
PREMIUM

We Begin at the End

Stubbornly loyal Walk and worldly-wise Duchess are complex, well-developed characters, each searching for truth and justice. Reminiscent of Charles Portis’s True Grit, Whitaker’s (Tall Oaks) literary thriller will satisfy fans of modern Westerns and readers who like strong heroines.l

The Smash-Up

In her fantastic adult debut, YA and middle grade author Benjamin (The Next Great Paulie Fink) skewers her subjects but still preserves their humanity. New York expats, middle-aged Gen-Xers, disaffected millennials, conniving school moms, exasperating children with improbable names--all get the gimlet eye in this timely, witty novel.

The Essentials Vol. 2: 52 More Must-See Movies and Why They Matter

Arnold’s knowledge is vast, and the joyful tone of his sprightly writing is infectious. With a foreword by current TCM host Ben Mankiewicz, an index and an extensive bibliography, and a list of all the films screened on The Essentials, this book will please film buffs of all ages and levels of cinema knowledge.

Best Pop Fiction of 2020

Best Crime Fiction of 2020

PREMIUM

The Sentinel

Longtime fans will be satisfied with this straightforward adventure filled with familiar Reacherisms and more depth. He even acquires a cell phone, briefly. Those who enjoy Grant’s “David Trevellyan” series will also enjoy this book. It’s fun—but also difficult—to try to discern which brother wrote what.
ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?