Laurel Bliss

57 Articles

Last 30 days
Last 6 months
Last 12 months
Last 24 months
Specific Dates

The Jasmine Throne

Suri (Realm of Ash) has created this world with great deliberation, including details about clothing, cuisine, and architecture. Malini and Priya both have depth and nuance, and their attraction to each other is written with care and sensitivity. Changing viewpoints help move the action along, but this is the first book in a trilogy, which inevitably means that some of the plotting will set the stage for books to come. Offer this to fans of Tanaz Bhathena or S.A. Chakraborty.
PREMIUM

The Mask Falling

Existing fans will cheer, while those new to the series should absolutely start with book one.
PREMIUM

Speculative Los Angeles

As with any anthology, the contents vary. Speculative fiction is a bit of a catchall term that may not be especially meaningful to readers. This particular collection seems geared toward an audience fond of dystopian short stories or longtime fans of Akashic’s “Noir” series wanting to branch out.
PREMIUM

Please Do Not Ask forMercy as a Refusal Often Offends

Dystopian novels are abundant these days, and this quirky entry feels timely and should appeal to readers who aren’t looking for romantic triangles or teen angst.
PREMIUM

Yellow Jessamine

Creating a macabre and sinister atmosphere in her horror/fantasy novella, Starling leaves details of the setting rather blurry. Suitable for readers of creepy Gothic tales.
PREMIUM

Ink & Sigil: From the World of the Iron Druid Chronicles

Delightful! Hearne’s (“Seven Kennings” series) use of Scottish words and spellings (detailed in the foreword) never becomes distracting, but instead adds to the story’s singular flavor. The author includes plenty of shout-outs for fans of the “Iron Druid” series, while introducing an intelligible tale sure to draw in new readers. Great for fans of Ben Aaronovitch, Jim Butcher, or Anton Strout.
PREMIUM

Queen of Storms

Overall, a perfectly standard epic fantasy with a payoff seemingly far off in the distance of future installments.
PREMIUM

The Somebody People

Starting with the first book of this duology (The Nobody People) is strongly recommended. Proehl’s use of alternating viewpoints and the occasional flashback help propel the story. However, for its length, it lacks meaningful character development. Should appeal to readers of Marissa Meyer’s “Renegades” series or those who enjoy dystopian X-Men stories.
PREMIUM

In the Kingdom of All Tomorrows

Wrapping up his “Eirlandia” trilogy perhaps a little too neatly, Lawhead offers a tale that should satisfy his fans but is unlikely to garner him new ones.
ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?