Erdrich, Louise

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The Night Watchman

National Book Award winner Erdrich once again calls upon her considerable storytelling skills to elucidate the struggles of generations of Native people to retain their cultural identity and their connection to the land. [See Prepub Alert, 9/9/19.]
PREMIUM

Future Home of the Living God

The rediscovered popularity of womb dystopia will surely fuel interest in Erdrich's Future; libraries should be prepared to provide multiformat access to the author's substantial audiences. ["This chilling speculative fiction is perfect for readers seeking the next Handmaid's Tale": LJ 9/15/17 review of the Harper hc.]
PREMIUM

Future Home of the Living God

Quite different from Erdrich's previous work, this chilling speculative fiction is perfect for readers seeking the next Handmaid's Tale. [See Prepub Alert, 5/8/17.]
PREMIUM

LaRose

Another mesmerizing accomplishment from an unparalleled storyteller. ["Erdrich creates a contained world in the dying prairie town of Pluto, a reservation border village, where white and tribal history come together and where Catholic and traditional spirit worlds, modernity, and the forbidding past intersect": LJ 5/15/16 review of the Harper hc.]
PREMIUM

LaRose

Erdrich creates a contained world in the dying prairie town of Pluto, a reservation border village, where white and tribal history come together and where Catholic and traditional spirit worlds, modernity and the forbidding past, all intersect. [See Prepub Alert, 11/2/15.]
PREMIUM

The Round House

The book is highly recommended for all collections. Read-a-likes include previous works by the author, some of which share characters with this work, or those by David Treuer, who also writes on Native American themes. ["Erdrich skillfully makes Joe's coming-of-age both universal and specific," read the review of the New York Times best-selling Harper hc, LJ 8/12.—Ed.]
PREMIUM

The Round House

Erdrich skillfully makes Joe's coming-of-age both universal and specific. Like many a teenage boy, he sneaks beer with his buddies, watches Star Trek: The Next Generation, and obsesses about sex. But the story is also ripe with detail about reservation life, and with her rich cast of characters, from Joe's alcoholic and sometimes violent uncle Whitey and his former-stripper girlfriend Sonja, to the ex-marine priest Father Travis and the gleefully lewd Grandma Thunder, Erdrich provides flavor, humor, and depth. Joe's relationship with his father, Bazil, a judge, has echoes of To Kill a Mockingbird, as Bazil explains to his son why he continues to seek justice despite roadblocks to prosecuting non-Indians. Recommended. [See Prepub Alert, 4/23/12.]

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