Audrey Snowden

36 Articles

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Wow, No Thank You: Essays

A sheer delight for Irby’s legions of fans. For those new to her work, or who enjoy Jenny Lawson, Roxane Gay, Jenny Slate, or Nora Ephron, this should be obtained immediately.
PREMIUM

Thinking Inside the Box: Adventures with Crosswords and the Puzzling People Who Can’t Live Without Them

Raphel’s approach is reminiscent of Mary Roach’s work, and even cruciverbalists well versed in their hobby’s history will discover something illuminating here. Nonpuzzling readers may discover a new hobby.
PREMIUM

Little Weirds

This volume mixes the oddball self-examination of Jenny Lawson with moments of poetic insight. Recommended for lovers of fizzy memoirs.
PREMIUM

What We Talk About When We Talk About Books: The History and Future of Reading

This clear-eyed exploration of the attitudes and trends around reading and books will likely provoke lively discussion. Recommended for anyone with an interest in these favorite forms of entertainment.

PREMIUM

Fifty Things That Aren't My Fault: Essays from the Grown-Up Years

Good for fans of Cathy and Nora Ephron's I Feel Bad About My Neck. Guisewite is not Ephron, but she's not trying to be. She's emphatically, jubilantly, Cathy.
PREMIUM

Frankenstein: How a Monster Became an Icon; The Science and Enduring Allure of Mary Shelley's Creation

Readers fond of Shelley's original work, as well as those who enjoy consuming the culture it's spawned and influenced, will find this a book to savor, and despite edited compilations not being the usual choice for book groups, this could be a stellar choice for any pop-culture savvy group that's recently worked with Shelley's title. Recommended.
PREMIUM

Making the Monster: The Science Behind Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Anyone interested in where Shelley's ideas may have come from will find a multitude of context in Harkup's volume. This is fascinating for those interested in the development of sf and in the difficult life of one of the genre's first authors.
PREMIUM

Jane on the Brain: Exploring the Science of Social Intelligence with Jane Austen

Recommended for Janeites and general readers interested in social intelligence—one needn't be a huge Austen fan to enjoy this odd combo. Particularly recommended for those who would delight in using the DSM-5 to diagnose Persuasion's Sir Walter Elliot with narcissistic personality disorder.

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