Related

Last 30 days
Last 6 months
Last 12 months
Last 24 months
Specific Dates
From:

To:
Specific Authors
Specific Publisher
PREMIUM

DCeased

A successfully scary and thrilling vision of the apocalypse, and a surprisingly moving examination of how beacons of hope cope with the realization that the end is nigh. Collects the entire best-selling miniseries.
PREMIUM

Pittsburgh

A thoughtful account of family and place that will be especially enjoyed by fans of graphic memoir. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

La Voz De M.A.Y.O.: Tata Rambo. Vol. 1

Barajas’s passion for his subject is clear, but haphazard pacing and a lack of context regarding the legal and tribal issues involved in the dispute make for an occasionally confusing read. Nevertheless, this is still an essential volume in what Frederick Luis Aldama’s introduction calls “reclaiming, restoring, and affirming Lantinxs as significant shapers of the historical record.”
PREMIUM

Witchfinder: Omnibus. Vol. 1

Riveting mysteries and thrilling action combine in stories with ongoing ramifications for the larger Hellboy universe. A solid purchase.
PREMIUM

Naomi: Season One

An exciting mystery and coming-of-age superhero origin story introducing an original heroine and a cliff-hanger ending sure to have readers eager for future installments. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists: A Graphic History of Women’s Fight for Their Rights

An incredibly comprehensive resource for readers seeking a look at women’s history that diverges from what is typically taught in school.

Lupus

Peeters is a compositional genius, utilizing stunning swaths of negative space and thick fields of inky darkness that imbue nearly every panel on every page of this volume with dynamism and pathos.

Holy Hannah

Dinksi (Trying Not To Notice) borrows heavily from the life of charismatic cult leader Jim Jones and the tragic events at Jonestown to create commentary on social media and the dangers of group think, illustrated in a deceptively simple cartooning style that makes the inevitable tragic ending truly jarring.
PREMIUM

The Man Without Talent

While the opening chapters deliver a portrait of an artist’s ennui, later scenes depicting Sukesawa’s interactions with the owner of a bird store and a bookseller in his village reveal that Tsgue’s (Nejishiki) actual interest lies in a withering dissection of male entitlement in a rapidly changing society.

Street Angel: Deadliest Girl Alive

Unimpressed at meeting Santa Claus but ebullient while serving out a prison sentence, Jesse is a scrappy yet supremely confident spitfire with appeal to readers of all ages.

No Longer Human

If the internationally acclaimed master of horror Ito (Smashed: Junji Ito Story Collection) seems at first a strange choice to adapt Dazai’s 1948 novel, his skill for stories mixing existential dread, body horror, and nightmarishly surreal imagery quickly prove him matched to the material. This unsparingly intense vision of life as a journey through hell, reminiscent of Dostoyevsky and Kafka, just might be Ito’s magnum opus.
PREMIUM

The House

Celebrated Spanish creator Roca’s (Twist of Fate) cartoonishly drawn characters are juxtaposed against highly detailed backgrounds, showcasing the strange dislocation they feel inhabiting a space that ought to feel much more like home in this melancholy and deeply sympathetic meditation on sibling dynamics and the role memory plays in the grieving process. [Note: a simultaneously released Spanish-language edition is also available from the publisher.
PREMIUM

Swimming in Darkness

Harari’s adept skills as a storyteller are elevated even further by his talents as a designer with a strong sense of color, as pleasantly round, cartoonish characters wander angular planes and inhabit a world filled with warm, glowing red rooms and grainy, foreboding purple skies.

Inappropriate

Memoir and fiction stand side by side, often in the same story, in this frequently hilarious, occasionally melancholy collection that affirms Bell’s status as one of the best cartoonists of her generation.

Making Comics

An engaging combination of how-to and why-you-must, perfect for Barry superfans, budding cartoonists, and anyone with a story itching to be told. [See the author interview, p. 77.]
PREMIUM

Blade Runner 2019. Vol. 1

This first chapter in an ongoing series that promises to bridge the gap between the classic 1982 film and the 2017 sequel from coauthors Green (Blade Runner 2049) and Johnson (Star Trek vs. Transformers) and artist Guinaldo (Justice League Dark) cleverly captures the tone of the source material while thrillingly expanding the scope of the larger world only hinted at in the films, resulting in the rare licensed title that feels essential instead of perfunctory.
PREMIUM

Bradley of Him

Willumsen pokes fun at the vapidity of celebrity culture and seems interested in satirizing a particularly American sense of entitlement, but ultimately he obscures whatever point he has in mind in favor of remaining willfully, and fascinatingly, perplexing.

Spider-Man: Life Story

A fantastic collection suggesting that Peter Parker, even more than his spandex-clad alter ego, is actually one of the greatest comic book characters of all time.
PREMIUM

Doomsday Clock: Part 1

A tense and gripping homage to Watchmen’s dissection of costumed crime fighters that also seems interested in probing the limits of its ongoing influence. A must for series followers, and a boon for DC fans seeking next chapters in its ever-expanding universe.
PREMIUM

Blossoms 666

The horrors of teen cliques as well as the machinations of demonic forces blossom throughout this latest from Bunn (Harrow County), Braga (Bombshells), and colorist Herms (Sonic Boom), unleashing a tense high school terror tale with vibrant visuals reminiscent of Patrick Nagel. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s Graphic Novels spotlight, “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

Batman: Damned

Bermejo’s richly painted vision of Gotham City is brilliantly gritty and terrifying, and Azzarello’s script is ambitious and complex if occasionally hard to follow, as mood and tone tend to trump narrative drive.
PREMIUM

Creation

An uncommonly empathic, beautifully illustrated examination of the conflict between the desire to serve and improve one’s community and the reality of the (underprivileged) community itself.
PREMIUM

Press Enter To Continue

While visually compelling, these five stories might not satisfy if taken individually. When read in sequence, however, the aggregated ambiguity and absurdity results in a sense of unease and eventually awe at Galvañ’s originality and technical expertise.
PREMIUM

EC Comics: Race, Shock, and Social Protest

Long before diversity became a buzzword and rallying cry throughout publishing, the notorious EC Comics sneaked socially conscious stories about civil rights and justice for minorities into its 1950s sensationalist anthologies...
PREMIUM

Showtime at the Apollo: The Epic Tale of Harlem’s Legendary Theater

Since 1934, Harlem’s Apollo theater has married devoted, multiracial audiences with the best among African American performers—who thought of the place as “home...
PREMIUM

Hot Comb

DEBUT It’s not just “hair,” but a symbol of female beauty, incubator of relationships, lifelong obsession, race and status indicator...

BTTM FDRS

Escaping her upwardly mobile parents, Darla moves back to their old neighborhood in Chicago’s Bottomyards to find bare-bones housing where she can grow her design business on the cheap...
PREMIUM

James Brown: Black and Proud

“The Godfather of Soul” came to fame during the 1960s civil rights movement...
PREMIUM

The Be-Bop Barbarians: Comic Book Bohemians to a 1950s Jazz Beat

In 1955 Harlem, three African American comikkers battle Cold War politics, prejudice, and temptation...
PREMIUM

Blues for Lady Day: The Story of Billie Holliday

Known for her recording of “Strange Fruit,” a lyrical ballad about lynchings, Billie Holiday became one of the greatest jazz singers of all time despite a troubled life of poverty, jail, violence, discrimination, ill-fated love, and substance abuse...

Sleepless

The illegitimate daughter of the late King of Harbeny, Lady “Poppy” Pyppenia would like nothing better than to retire from court...
PREMIUM

Baaaad Muthaz

They’re Afro Desia, Cali Vera, Alley Bastard, Candy Ass, and Katana Jade: “The all-female space pirates who double as a James Brown revival band!” exclaims Pamela, an alligator-like pwanta seeking music to mate by...
PREMIUM

Bitter Root. Vol. 1: Family Business

The Sangereye family—Ma Etta, Blink, Cullen, Berg, Ford, and Uncle Enoch—blends potions of roots and other conjurings to rid souls of hate and racism...
PREMIUM

Angola Janga: Kingdom of Runaway Slaves

Brazil’s east coast, 1600–1740...

LaGuardia

Here, the stigmatized immigrant aliens are aliens from outer space, the Nigerians are the good guys, a family’s “putting down roots” acquires novel implications, prosthetic body parts bypass the usual assumptions, and genocide turns up where you least expect it...

PREMIUM

Vindication. Vol. 1

Meet two cops gone rogue (one with good intentions), their two ex-girlfriend gumshoes who collaborate, three murder victims, three former jurors in dire straits—and one man with family problems who did ten years in prison but shouldn’t have...

PREMIUM

Bury the Lede

Featuring graphic sex, nudity, some gory violence, and disturbing themes, this is an overall flawed but ultimately promising comics debut from a popular multimedia creator.

The Art of Nothing: 25 Years of Mutts and the Art of Patrick McDonnell

This gorgeous volume celebrates the brilliance of McDonnell and pure cartooning. Animal lovers, the artist’s fans, and connoisseurs of art history will enjoy.

Grass

Gendry-Kim’s thoughtful storytelling and exquisite brushwork brilliantly convey Ok-sun’s story, producing an uncommonly powerful reading experience about one woman’s enduring struggle for agency over her own life and body.

Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations

This brilliant record of Jacob’s attempt at navigating personal and political issues in modern America manages the feat of being provocative and entertaining in equal measure. Highly recommended for all collections.

LaGuardia

Speaking to the global immigration and refugee crises through the lens of Afrofuturism, this brilliant and decidedly progressive work will be an essential addition to most adult graphic novels collections. [See Martha Cornog’s “Afrofuturism and More,” LJ 11/19.]
PREMIUM

The Man Who Came Down the Attic Stairs

Sporting elusive black-and-white art that utilizes the power of the comic form to heighten the emotional resonance of the story, Loup (Bad Boyfriends) creates a strikingly literary horror by externalizing and incarnating the miasma of postpartum depression. A solid addition for adult graphic novel collections.

Is This How You See Me? A Locas Story

Beautifully drawn, humorous, bittersweet, and poignant, this important chapter in the “Love and Rockets” universe, which stands as a self-contained graphic novel in its own right, is essential for most collections, especially those carrying the other books in the series.
PREMIUM

Maria M. Vol. 1 & 2

Some fans might miss the emotional intricacies present in much of Hernandez’s best work, but the combination of classic cartooning and cinematic storytelling, as well as graphic sex and violence, pushed to near surrealistic extremes, should satisfy most devotees and inspire the creation of even more.
PREMIUM

Our Encounters with Evil: Adventures of Professor J.T. Meinhardt and His Assistant Mr. Knox

Johnson-Cadwell shares Mignola’s taste for stories-within-stories, gruesome mythologies, and a reminiscent, though less refined, illustration style, resulting in a work that is satisfyingly horrific but refreshingly imaginative and playful.

Qualification: A Graphic Memoir in Twelve Steps

Whether the painful, incredibly personal details Heatley shares are an expression of uncommon bravery or narcissism is debatable, but readers will find themselves moved by this stunning memoir, and perhaps even grateful for the author’s refusal to shy away from depicting the complexity of his ongoing development as an artist and a human being.

Nancy: A Comic Collection

Jaimes manages to maintain Bushmiller’s minimalism and penchant for formal experimentation while creating something fresh, relevant, and most important, very funny.
PREMIUM

Animal Farm: The Graphic Novel

While Orwell’s classic 1945 novella is a specific satire of the Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union under Stalin, this skillful adaptation highlights the relevance of Orwell’s warning to stay vigilant against the gradual erosion of freedom and to resist leaders who preach equality but demand absolute fealty.
PREMIUM

The Best American Comics 2019

A terrific collection that perfectly captures the zeitgeist.

The Death of the Master

Kyle’s odd pacing and deadpan sense of humor work together to highlight the absurdity of this off-kilter and occasionally achingly familiar world.
PREMIUM

Little Bird. Vol. 1: The Fight for Elder’s Hope

While the story seems heavily inspired by European sf epics such as The Incal, it feels totally original owing to Van Poelgeest’s smart and sincere script and Bertram’s fantastic use of jittery lines and intricate detail to depict awe-inspiring landscapes, weird technology, and intense violence.
PREMIUM

Bloodlust & Bonnets

McGovern’s purposefully crude character designs are offset by her knack for pacing, slapstick, and composing scenes that convey character development through legitimately witty dialog in this exuberant debut.
PREMIUM

The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television

Shadmi (Highywayman) cleverly allows his subject to narrate his own story, adding poignancy and depth to this comprehensive, entertaining biography.

Reincarnation Stories

While the work Deitch has produced since 1967 has already earned him acclaim as one of the world’s greatest living cartoonists, this latest release is both his most accessible and, at last, his masterpiece. [See author interview, LJ 10/19.]

I Know What I Am: The Life and Times of Artemisia Gentileschi

Siciliano’s exquisite craftsmanship is clear on every page of this occasionally dense but consistently engrossing volume, which portrays the artist’s plight with affection and urgency, convincingly arguing that Gentileschi’s accomplishments are deserved of recognition given her male counterparts.
PREMIUM

Meyer

The script from Lang (Plunder) is fast paced and witty, while the illustrations from Mutti (Port of Earth. Vol. 3) capture southern Florida’s pastel noir vibe in a thrilling caper clearly inspired by the novels of Elmore Leonard and Carl Hiaasen.
PREMIUM

Glenn Ganges in “The River at Night.”

There’s little plot and the stakes are low, but that doesn’t stop this latest from the accomplished Huizenga (Curses) from being a remarkably intelligent, playful, at times actually stressful, and thoroughly relatable reading experience like nothing else.
PREMIUM

Heroes in Crisis

Mann (Gambit: King of Thieves; The Complete Collection) renders dynamic action and somber moments of conversation and reflection equally well, while the narrative by King (Mister Miracle) explores some fascinating corners of many classic characters’ psyches and the toll that war takes on even the mightiest warriors with nuance and sensitivity. Unfortunately, the plot feels increasingly padded as it progresses, and the bafflingly complicated solution to the mystery is far from satisfying. Collects the entire nine-issue limited series.
PREMIUM

The Invisible Empire: Madge Oberholtzer and the Unmasking of the Ku Klux Klan

Coauthors Neilson (World of Warcraft: Curse of the Worgen) and Warger at times favor overly expository dialog at the expense of plot and character development, but they ultimately present this important chapter in American history with a great deal of gravitas, aided by the photorealistic illustrations from Borstel (18 Days).

Ryuko. Vols. 1 & 2

Respected fine artist Yoshimizu propels an enormous cast through a complicated plot that twists and turns without ever losing momentum and presents action sequences—of which there are many—in brilliantly disorienting compositions that emphasize speed and a sense of unfolding carnage. Fun for fans of Manga, crime epics, espionage thrillers, action adventure, and bold choices in illustration and storytelling.
PREMIUM

The Borgias

An epic historical saga of blood, sex, and corruption. Originally published in four separate volumes, collected as a single work for the first time.
PREMIUM

Isabellae. Vol. 1

Spanish creators Raule (Jazz Maynard) and Gabor (Agrippine) feature a cast of likable characters, plenty of surprising twists, and brilliantly designed and dynamic action scenes is this collection comprising three volumes previously unavailable in English. Readers will be anxious for the forthcoming second volume, which promises to conclude the story.

Snow, Glass, Apples

Doran, drawing inspiration from art nouveau and Irish illustrator Harry Clarke, eschews conventional formatting and panel grids, presenting the story in lush, fully painted, free-flowing layouts that nicely complement Gaiman’s lyrical narration. An excellent choice for adult horror collections.
PREMIUM

Americana: (And the Act of Getting over It)

Healy might never quite get to the bottom of America, but his thoughtful storytelling provides a funny and honest peek into a life-changing quest most people will never experience firsthand, making it appealing for hiking enthusiasts and couch potatoes alike.
PREMIUM

The Hard Tomorrow

Davis’s subtle take on a major philosophical question is an efficient and affective read for anyone struggling to find purpose in trying times.
PREMIUM

House of Whispers. Vol. 1: The Power Divided

A new story existing in Gaiman’s Sandman Universe, this ongoing series, cowritten by Nalo Hopkinson (Midnight Robber) and Dan Watters (24 Panels; Limbo), collects the first story line in a delightfully dark magical adventure that credibly utilizes the wonderful Americana of mythic New Orleans as the enchanted setting.
PREMIUM

The Empty Man: Recurrence

Veteran scribe Bunn (Harrow County), with artist Hervás (Lucas Stand) and colorist Guardia, brings dense plotting and chilling body-horror imagery in this gripping first installment of an ongoing series that metaphorically uses social media as a strange virus metastasizing terror.
PREMIUM

Grace: The Jeff Buckley Story

Passion and sincerity make this take on Buckley’s tale stand out--just as with Buckley’s music. Recommended not just for Buckley enthusiasts but also for fans of music and biographies of all stripes; some profanity and sensual imagery, suitable for all but the youngest readers.
PREMIUM

King of King Court

A visually engaging and human story of early trauma and how art and the imagination persist through the toughest of times. For those interested in real-world stories of accounts of people coping with difficult family situations.
PREMIUM

How I Tried to Be a Good Person

Intensely personal and sexually explicit, this chronicle of Lust’s young adulthood life is told with specificity and scrutiny, ideal for adult graphic memoir enthusiasts. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s “Mass Appeal,” 6/19.]

Bad Weekend

With this Eisner Award–winning volume, expanding stories first serialized in the “Criminal” series, the incomparable team of Brubaker and Phillips (My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies; The Fade Out) once again prove themselves among the best creators of crime fiction in any genre.
PREMIUM

The Green Lantern. Vol. 1: Intergalactic Lawman

Sharp’s (The Brave and The Bold: Batman and Wonder Woman) illustrations suggest legendary comics artist Neal Adams paying homage to surrealist painter H.R. Giger (or vice versa). Morrison’s (Batman by Grant Morrison Omnibus, Vol. 2) script mixes police procedural thriller plot points with mind-boggling sf concepts. Not to be missed. Collecting Issues 1–6 of a new ongoing series.

Rusty Brown

Masterfully illustrated, brilliantly designed, and bursting with compassion for characters united by time and space who nonetheless feel isolated owing to fear and shame, this is without a doubt one of the most exciting releases of the year. [an editor’s pick, see “Fall Fireworks,” p. 23.]

Atar Gull

Fans of Nury’s other works, stories of slave revolts, and seeing the comeuppance of reviled slave owners will find this an outstanding and emotional graphic novel.
PREMIUM

Amazing Decisions: The Illustrated Guide to Improving Business Deals and Family Meals

This clear volume makes Ariely’s ideas accessible to a wide audience interested in decision-making in either a personal or business context. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]

The End of the World

An idiosyncratic and strangely poignant marvel from a true visionary
PREMIUM

Heavy Liquid

Drawing inspiration from noir films, cyberpunk, manga, and the world of high fashion, this work has a influenced an entire generation of cartoonists but remarkably still feels fresh today

Bad Gateway

Hanselmann (One More Year) is a phenomenally talented, internationally renowned cartoonist who switches between laugh-out-loud absurdist humor and startlingly raw scenes of extreme sadness from one panel to the next, and this is his finest, funniest, and most mature work to date
PREMIUM

The Tenderness of Stones

A profoundly moving and curiously playful meditation on the complex swirl of emotions and sense of having entered a surreal world often experienced by caregivers. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s Graphic Novel Spotlight, “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

Frogcatchers

Readers familiar with the themes that the prolific Lemire routinely explores might find the twists and turns here a tad predictable, but the author tells his story with such passion and empathy for his characters that it’s hard not to get swept up and genuinely moved by the ending nonetheless. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s Graphic Novels Spotlight, “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

Hot Comb

Readers are sure to find these stories moving and illuminating, and may be shocked to discover, given the talent on display, that this is Flower’s first book
PREMIUM

The Envious Siblings: And Other Morbid Nursery Rhymes

The influence of Quentin Blake, Tim Burton, and especially Edward Gorey is clear, but the combination of surreal comedy and imagery far more horrific than any ever created by the artists by whom he was obviously inspired set Blair apart and result in an audacious and entertaining compilation
PREMIUM

Heart of Darkness

Incredibly, Kuper has created a faithful adaptation likely to appeal to both devotees and detractors of the source material, which just might cause members of either camp to view the text in a new light. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s Graphic Novel Spotlight, “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

Planet of the Apes Omnibus: Before the Fall

Cocreators Hardman and Bechko (Green Lantern: Earth One, Vol. 1) have successfully crafted a tie-in to a favorite sf film that actually lives up to the original. This omnibus edition collects Betrayal of the Planet of the Apes, Exile on the Planet of the Apes, and Planet of the Apes: Cataclysm
PREMIUM

Basquiat

This compelling fusion of subject and style brilliantly uses cameos by some of the celebrities Basquiat encountered over his brief life—including Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, and Madonna (whom Basquiat briefly dated)

Cemetery Beach

Ellis (The Wild Storm, Vol. 3) and Howard (The Astounding Wolf-Man: Complete Collection) deliver what might be the single most fast-paced, action-packed graphic novel of all time, with nearly every page featuring either an explosion, gunfight, or leap from something either very high up or moving extremely fast. This collection of the seven-issue miniseries is a total blast

Once upon a Time in France

Reminiscent of the best novels of John Le Carré, but based on true events, this is an absolutely riveting thriller that asks difficult questions about good and evil and whether actions taken in the heat of battle can be fairly adjudicated in peacetime. It’s easy to see why this work has already won the coveted Angoulême Award and sold over one million copies internationally. [an editor’s pick, see “Fall Fireworks,” LJ 8/19, p. 23.]

PREMIUM

Moonshadow: The Definitive Edition

This classic work has been regarded as a beloved masterpiece since its initial release between 1985 and 1987. This new, definitive edition, which features a plethora of production notes, sketches, and script pages, is sure to enhance its reputation
PREMIUM

Bitter Root. Vol. 1: Family Business

Walker (The Life of Frederick Douglass), Greene (Black Comix Returns), and Renzi (FBP) present the relentless action that takes place across Issues 1–5 gathered in this volume in a kinetic style that makes good use of 1920s period details to anchor the story, which develops slowly before kicking into high gear halfway through and concluding on a legitimately exciting cliff-hanger

Maggy Garrisson

Moody, modern noir stories are a dime a dozen, but Trondheim’s knack for characterization and the wonderfully detailed and vividly colored illustrations from Oiry (Through the Walls: Slightly Oversized) elevate this one above the rest
PREMIUM

Aquaman. Vol. 1: Unspoken Water

DeConnick is in no rush to offer any explanations for Arthur’s new circumstances, which results in occasionally frustrating early chapters, but the story picks up in the second half and heads to a thrilling climax that upends Arthur’s history and promises intriguing escapades to come
PREMIUM

Die. Vol. 1: Fantasy Heartbreaker

Fans of any of the genres represented in this volume, which collects Issues 1–5 of the continuing series, will find much to enjoy

PREMIUM

They Called Us Enemy

Takei is nothing if not savvy about his cultural influence, and here he uses that to share a fully fleshed-out and articulate vilification of America’s most xenophobic tendencies.[Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s Graphic Novel Spotlight, “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

Happy Sugar Life. Vol. 1

Labeled a psychological thriller, this sadistic, eerie tale is anything but sugary or happy, dealing with difficult issues such as rape, stalking, Stockholm syndrome, and murder. Geared toward mature audiences, this certainly isn’t for everyone, but it will likely still appeal to fans of the genre.
PREMIUM

Hawkman. Vol. 1: Awakening

Fans of Venditti’s previous work, the DC Universe, and reboots of favorite superheroes will find this new Hawkman on an exciting journey to understand his past.

Monstress: Book One

Liu and Takeda combine steampunk and Lovecraftian-like eldritch horror in a world resembling an early 20th-century matriarchal Asia. Recommended for older teens and adults for mature language and content, and for fans of Tolkien and George R.R. Martin seeking to be immersed in a new fantasy epic.
PREMIUM

Fearless Females

Breen’s straightforward style makes this ideal for middle school readers and beyond. Also a great historical supplement for anybody interested in the global rights of women told in a graphic novel format.

The Arab of the Future. Vol. 4: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1987–1992

The difficulty of growing up in a culture you feel no commonality with is powerful in this volume and will definitely resonate with some readers. Others will be touched by the humor amid the drama. A must for most collections, especially those with the previous books in the series.
PREMIUM

Moonbound: Apollo 11 and the Dream of Spaceflight

A well-paced yet deep look at the path that led to the first man on the moon, including the early lunar myths, philosophies and fantasies that predated it. Appropriate for those interested in the history of space flight and 20th-century culture. [Previewed in Ingrid Bohnenkamp’s Graphic Novels Spotlight, “Mass Appeal,” LJ 6/19.]
PREMIUM

Livewire. Vol. 1: Fugitive

Overall, an intriguing story that will appeal to fans of the Valiant Event “Harbinger Wars,” who will enjoy the breakout treatment of Livewire. However, newcomers will struggle to follow along, and background reading is necessary to grasping the larger narrative arc.
articles

Get connected. Join our global community of more than 200,000 librarians and educators.

Get access to 8000+ annual reviews of books, ebooks, and more

As low as $13.50/month