Sweeping the New Year Clean | Wyatt's World

This month, Marie Kondō’s decluttering movement takes to the airwaves with Netflix’s Tidying Up with Marie Kondō. Yet books about cleaning up and getting organized populate the publishing calendar well into March. Below are a few examples for a well-stocked display.

This month, Marie Kondō’s decluttering movement takes to the airwaves with Netflix’s Tidying Up with Marie Kondō. Yet books about cleaning and getting organized populate the publishing calendar well into March. Below are a few examples to pile up with last year's hits, such as Margareta Magnusson’s The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning, for a well-stocked display.
 

  • Minimalist HomeThe Minimalist Home: A Room-by-Room Guide to a Decluttered, Refocused Life by Joshua Becker (Random).
    The latest from blogger Becker (The More of Less) is one of the year's hot new books and guides readers through the process of paring down. Two more Random titles from big names in the happiness circuit and on Instagram include Gretchen Rubin’s Outer Order, Inner Calm: Declutter and Organize To Make More Room for Happiness (Harmony) and Clea Shearer and Joanna Teplin’s The Home Edit: A Guide to Organizing and Realizing Your House Goals (Clarkson Potter).

 

  • The CHAOS Cure: Clean Your House and Calm Your Soul in 15 Minutes by Marla Cilley (Seal).
    Popular online personality Cilley presents a no-nonsense, straightforward manual to keeping one's home tidy and under control. For readers who don't dare invite people into a mess, Cilley has a plan.

 

  • A Monk's Guide to a Clean House and Mind by Shoukei Matsumoto (TarcherPerigee). Trying to elbow its way into the space Kondō created is this meditative guide to tranquility through keeping a spotless home. The idea is that being more orderly is not a means to an end but a state of mind that can instill calm.

 

  • Cozy Minimalist Home: More Style, Less Stuff by Myquillyn Smith (Zondervan).
    The author of The Nesting Place returns to help readers get the rooms and the house they desire by using what they have, getting rid of what they don’t need, and seeing their space anew. Erica Feldmann’s HausMagick: Transform Your Home with Witchcraft (Harper) will also appeal to those who dream that they, like Disney's Merlin, could simply cast a spell to get a room in tip-top shape.

 

  • The Martha Manual: How To Do (Almost) Everything by Martha Stewart (Houghton Harcourt).
    More wide ranging than the other titles listed here, this bible to home care and creative living has sections on organizing, cleaning, fixing, and embellishing one's space. As aspirational as practical, it comes with solid tips and lots of photos.
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Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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