Summer Reads, Jun. 4, 2019 | Book Pulse

Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark gets a trailer. Tie-in novels get attention. The Lamdba Literary awards are announced. Influential book buyer Pennie Clark Ianniciello picks The Summer Wives by Beatriz Williams as her June title. A librarian wins the day on Jeopardy.

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Summer Reads

In Costco Connection, influential book buyer Pennie Clark Ianniciello picks The Summer Wives by Beatriz Williams (William Morrow: Harper), newly out in paperback today, as her June title. The Buyers's June pick is City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert (Riverhead: Penguin).

The StarTribune offers its picks for summer books.

LitHub gathers "15 Books You Should Read This June."

BookMarks selects "5 Sci-Fi and Fantasy Books for June."

CrimeReads names "June's Best New Crime Novels And Thrillers."

Reviews

The NYT reviews Underland: A Deep Time Journey by Robert Macfarlane (W.W. Norton; LJ starred review): "this is an excellent book — fearless and subtle, empathic and strange. It is the product of real attention and tongue-and-groove workmanship." Also, The Electric Hotel by Dominic Smith (Sarah Crichton Books: Macmillan): "radiant ... a vital and highly entertaining work about the act of creation, and about what it means to pick up and move on after you’ve lost everything." The Crowded Hour: Theodore Roosevelt, the Rough Riders, and the Dawn of the American Century by Clay Risen (Scribner: S. & S.): "fast-paced, carefully researched ... feels like the best type of war reporting." My Life as a Rat by Joyce Carol Oates (Ecco: Harper): "Oates has long been preoccupied with male violence, racial strife and female victimhood, [this novel] has all three of these elements in abundance." The paper also gathers "New & Noteworthy Audiobooks." The "Shortlist" features books about "Art, Love and Longing, the French Way."

USA Today reviews City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert (Riverhead: Penguin), giving it 3.5 stars and  calling it "the perfect summer novel."

NPR reviews Underland: A Deep Time Journey by Robert Macfarlane (W.W. Norton; LJ starred review): "explores subterranean spaces with the yearning of a man who feels awe." Also, Soulless: The Case Against R. Kelly by Jim Derogatis (Abrams): "For anyone interested in #MeToo, this is an essential book. But don't look to DeRogatis for any glimmers of hope or triumph." Fall; or, Dodge in Hell by Neal Stephenson (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred reviewed): "Stephenson's greatest strength as a writer has always been that he sees just a little bit further and a little bit clearer than the rest of us do. He can't always seem to decide what's worth rhapsodizing about. But when he focuses, he can show us some truly amazing things."

The Washington Post reviews Sara Collins's The Confessions of Frannie Langton(Harper): "a startling, compelling historical debut novel ... that should be on top of your vacation reading pile. Also, City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert (Riverhead: Penguin): "The best and worst thing that can be said about [it] is that it’s perfectly pleasant, the kind of book one wouldn’t mind finding in a vacation condo during a rainy week." Patsy by Nicole Dennis-Benn (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): "a deeply queer, sensitive and vividly written novel about a woman’s right to want and a child’s right to carve her own path." This Storm by James Ellroy (Knopf): "Ellroy has reached the midpoint of his most ambitious undertaking to date. The final two volumes can’t come quickly enough." In children's books is a collection "about finding - and being- who you are." Lastly, the paper celebrates Tony Horwitz in a review of Spying on the South: An Odyssey Across the American Divide (Penguin).

Briefly Noted

The Lamdba Literary awards are announced.

LJ posts Prepub Alerts for December.

BookMarks interviews Nicole Dennis-Benn, Patsy (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review), who shares "five books about Immmigrants."

Entertainment Weekly interviews Elizabeth Gilbert, City of Girls (Riverhead: Penguin).

The Washington Post interviews Tan France, Naturally Tan: A Memoir (St. Martin's Press: Macmillan).

O Magazine interviews Ocean Vuong, On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous (Penguin; LJ starred review).

The New Yorker has a new piece by Viet Thanh Nguyen, "Hereafter, Faraway."

Electric Lit features The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters by Balli Kaur Jaswal (William Morrow: Harper).

Elle excerpts For Such a Time as This: Hope and Forgiveness after the Charleston Massacre by Sharon Risher, with Sherri Wood Emmons (Chalice Press).

The NYT reports on an article in the Stanpoint about Martin Luther King by one of his Pulitzer Prize-winning biographers that is now the subject of a hot debate.

Entertainment Weekly runs its YA column.

Librarian Emma Boettcher just won Jeopardy- with a question invovlving books and authors.

The NYT goes back to its archive to explain "What Happened After P.G. Wodehouse Was Captured During World War II."

Authors on Air

PBS NewsHour has discussion questions for The Fifth Season by N. K. Jemisin (Orbit: Hachette: LJ starred review). Also, an interview with Esme Weijun Wang, The Collected Schizophrenias: Essays (Graywolf Press: Macmillan).

Deadline Hollywood reports that Rebecca Stott’s In The Days of Rain is headed to TV. Robert McCammon's Speaks The Nightbird is set for FX. Lucky by Alice Sebold is getting adapted for the movies. Eliza Griswold’s Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America will become a limited series.

Paste reports that the new podcast SongWriter will explore "Intersections of Music and Literature" and feature authors such as Roxane Gay, Susan Orlean, Rick Moody, Gary Shteyngart, Joyce Carol Oates, and Jonathan Lethem.

The Guardian writes about tie-in novels.

Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark gets a trailer.

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Author Image
Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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