Run Your Week: Big Books, Sure Bets, & Titles Making News, Oct. 14, 2019 | Book Pulse

The Guardians by John Grisham leads holds this week. People’s “Book of the Week” is Olive, Again by Elizabeth Strout. Ronan Farrow, Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators gets focused coverage. Dolittle, now renamed from the original title The Voyage of Doctor Dolittle and based on the books by Hugh Lofting, gets a trailer. Earthquake Bird, based on the book by Susanna Jones, does as well.

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Big Books of the Week 

The Guardians by John Grisham (Doubleday: Random House) leads holds this week.

Other titles in demand include:  

Olive, Again by Elizabeth Strout (Random House; LJ starred review)

Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators by Ronan Farrow (Little, Brown: Hachette)

Stealth by Stuart Woods (G.P. Putnam’s Sons: Penguin)

The Body: A Guide for Occupants by Bill Bryson (Doubleday: Random House)

Let It Snow by Nancy Thayer (Ballantine Books: Random House)

Librarians and Booksellers Suggest

There are three LibraryReads picks this week, including the No.1 choice for October, The Body: A Guide for Occupants by Bill Bryson (Doubleday: Random House)

“A fascinating look at the human body and how it functions. Each historical tidbit is well-researched and thoroughly cited. Interesting stories, such as how diseases, cells, nerves, and organs were discovered, are woven throughout. For readers who like narrative nonfiction such as Gulp by Mary Roach, Being Mortal by Atul Gawande, and Guts by Giulia Enders.” —Carolynn Waites, Manvel Library, Manvel, TX

The Art of Theft by Sherry Thomas (Berkley: Penguin)

“In this fun, playful series, Thomas has created a female version of Holmes who is vibrant, real, relatable, and intelligent. This fourth book has Holmes and Watson travel to France, with twists and turns the reader won’t see coming. Perfect for fans of Laurie R. King’s Mary Russell series and Tasha Alexander’s Lady Emily series.” — Carrie Pedigo, Tippecanoe County Public Library, Lafayette, IN

Olive, Again by Elizabeth Strout (Random House; LJ starred review)

“Olive Kitteridge is back and still as crotchety, opinionated, and endearing as ever. Aging, death, racism, prejudices, infidelities—nothing gets past Olive as she sticks her nose into every corner of her small town.” —Sharon Hutchins, Keytesville Library, Keytesville, MO

It is also an Indie Next selection:

“Thank goodness Elizabeth Strout decided to return for another round with one of the most beloved, maddening, confounding, and compelling characters I have ever had the pleasure of meeting. Readers will delight in the fact that Olive, while forging new relationships and puzzling over long-existing ones, remains the crazy, complicated family member you just can’t quit. Add in spare yet beautifully rendered prose about the rugged, breathtaking state of Maine and you’ve got a gem of a book, one that leaves you rooting for Olive, despite her numerous shortcomings, as she stumbles through love, friendship, loss, and what it means to grow old. Strout, through Olive, reminds us that it’s a messy business being human, but it’s a privilege to be along for the ride.” —Page Berger, Barrett Bookstore, Darien, CT

Three additional Indie Next choices hit shelves this week as well:

Life Undercover: Coming of Age in the CIA by Amaryllis Fox (Knopf)

“Her unconventional childhood—think playing unsupervised on the streets of Moscow, St. Petersburg, and Washington, D.C.—prepared Amaryllis Fox for a career in the CIA. She was recruited because as part of her master’s studies at Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service, she developed an algorithm that was amazingly accurate at predicting where terrorist cells might pop up in the world. Soon, she was deployed as a spy in the Middle East while posing as an art dealer. After 10 years, Fox left the CIA and is now a writer, a current events analyst, a peace activist, and a mother. One wonders what is next in her fascinating life!” —Sally Wizik Wills, Beagle and Wolf Books & Bindery, Park Rapids, MN

Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me by Adrienne Brodeur (HMH; LJ starred review)

“This extraordinary memoir is destined to become a classic in the genre. Brodeur is a gifted storyteller with a doozy of a story to tell, as she is 14 years old when her mother makes her complicit in the decade-long affair between her mother and her stepfather’s best friend. Everything about this book is rich—the setting on Cape Cod and the strong sense of place; the unforgettable character of Brodeur’s mother, the incomparable Malabar; cinematic moments that stop the reader in their tracks; and layer upon layer of provocative themes around mother-daughter relationships, family secrets, and identity. I can’t stop thinking about this book.” —Allison Hill, Vroman’s Bookstore, Pasadena, CA

Running with Sherman: The Donkey with the Heart of a Hero by Christopher McDougall  (Knopf)

Running With Sherman is one of those special books that just makes you happy. Sherman, an abused donkey adopted by Christopher McDougall and family, needs a task, and that task turns out to be joining the World Championship of burro running in Colorado. In his inimitably engaging style, McDougall has taken the best of his two previous books—the personal stories of Born to Run and the history from Natural Born Heroes—and created the most enjoyable book I’ve read this year. I laughed, I got teary, I smiled a lot. Sherman is my new hero!” —Pete Mock, McIntyre’s Fine Books, Pittsboro, NC (Nov)

These books and others publishing the week of Oct. 14, 2019, are listed in a downloadable spreadsheet.

In the Media

People’s “Book of the Week” is Olive, Again by Elizabeth Strout (Random House; LJ starred review). Also getting attention are Captain Tammie Jo Shults's Nerves of Steel: How I Followed My Dreams, Earned My Wings, and Faced My Greatest Challenge (Thomas Nelson: Harper) and Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes (Pamela Dorman Books: Penguin; LJ starred review). People’s Picks include Jojo Rabbit, Treadstone, The King, and The Laundromat. The magazine asks what some stars are reading: Dr. Ruth is reading Night: A Memoir by Elie Wiesel (Hill and Wang: Macmillan), Rosanne Cash selects Figuring by Maria Popova (Pantheon: Random House), and Christina Applegate is reading Scrappy Little Nobody by Anna Kendrick (Gallery: S. & S.). There is a feature on Oprah, one on Carly Simon, Touched by the Sun: My Friendship with Jackie (FSG: Macmillan), and a story about Debbie Harry, Face It: A Memoir (Dey Street Books: HarperCollins).

Reviews

NPR reviews Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators by Ronan Farrow (Little, Brown: Hachette): “a measured but damning portrait.” Also, A Lush and Seething Hell: Two Tales of Cosmic Horror by John Hornor Jacobs (Harper): “is liable to equally and cosmically frighten all who open it.” Orpheus Girl by Brynne Rebele-Henry (Soho Teen: Random House): “The emotionally dramatic narrative, though loose and seemingly disjointed at times, rings incredibly true. It is a tale, much like the myth referenced in the title, similarly painful and beautiful.” Kingdom for a Stage by Heidi Heilig (Greenwillow Books: Harper): “the kind of author who comes up with the kind of clever premises that make other writers wring their hands in envy.” The Man Who Saw Everything by Deborah Levy (Bloomsbury: Macmillan): “Levy's writing is playful, smart, and full of memorable lines.”

The NYT reviews Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators by Ronan Farrow (Little, Brown: Hachette): "absorbing.” Also, Self-Portrait in Black and White: Unlearning Race by Thomas Chatterton Williams (W.W. Norton): “so honest and fresh in his observations, so skillful at blending his own story with larger principles, that it is hard not to admire him. At a time of increasing division, his philosophizing evinces an underlying generosity. He reaches both ways across the aisle of racism, arguing above all for reciprocity, and in doing so begins to theorize the temperate peace of which all humanity is sorely in need.” The paper also writes about books focused on “Mastering Middle School Friendship Drama” and the Children’s Book column is out.

The L.A. Times reviews Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years by Julie Andrews with Emma Walton Hamilton (Hachette; LJ starred review), calling it a “graceful look back at her Hollywood years.”

The Washington Post reviews Border Wars: Inside Trump's Assault on Immigration by Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Michael D. Shear (S. & S.): “more than simply a book about his administration’s strategizing and ill-fated efforts … also reveals the rampant dysfunction within the administration, much of it a result of no one’s capability to rein in the president, and his aide Stephen Miller.” Also, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me by Adrienne Brodeur (HMH; LJ starred review): “eloquent — and lurid — tale of a mother-daughter bond gone awry.” Targeted: The Cambridge Analytica Whistleblower's Inside Story of How Big Data, Trump, and Facebook Broke Democracy and How It Can Happen Again by Brittany Kaiser (Harper): “a book that is both important and gripping.” Mindf*ck: Cambridge Analytica and the Plot to Break America by Christopher Wylie (Random House): “takes readers into some of the darkest corners of social media manipulation while at the same time showcasing one man’s journey as a self-styled whistleblower.” The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11 by Garrett M. Graff (Avid Reader Press): “Stitched together with first-person accounts, he crafts an incredibly evocative and compelling re-creation of the day, with just words and the barest handful of photographs.” Deep State: Trump, the FBI, and the Rule of Law by James B. Stewart (Penguin): “a first draft of history that reminds us just how bizarre these times really are.”

Briefly Noted

USA Today picks its books for the week.

Paste selects “The Best Audiobooks of October 2019.”

LitHub offers “12 Books by Indigenous Writers to Read this Indigenous Peoples Day.”

The Atlantic has a piece entitled “Ways of Being: Three new books explore the variety of transgender experiences.”

The Guardian runs down the odds for the Booker Prize winner.

The NYT has a feature on James Comey, A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership (Flatiron: Macmillan). There is also a feature on John le Carré, Agent Running in the Field (Viking: Penguin).

Tor.com has “From the Zombie Post-Apocalypse to a Haunted Underworld: Where to Start with Seanan McGuire’s Books.”

The NYT runs an essay by Dan Kois, How to Be a Family: The Year I Dragged My Kids Around the World to Find a New Way to Be Together (Little, Brown: Hachette). Also, a piece by Kristen Arnett, Mostly Dead Things (Tin House), about Florida books and TV.

Bustle writes “How Sandra Cisneros's House On Mango Street Influenced 5 Latinx Authors.”

Electric Lit offers “7 Literary Icons Who Moonlighted as Children’s Authors.”

The NYT reconsiders the advice in some popular personal finance books.

The Washington Post interviews Dave Pilkey, Dog Breath: The Horrible Trouble with Hally Tosis    (Scholastic).

USA Today interviews Ali Wong, Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets & Advice for Living Your Best Life (Random House). Also, a spotlight on Adam Rippon, Beautiful on the Outside: A Memoir (Grand Central: Hachette; LJ starred review), and more about Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators by Ronan Farrow (Little, Brown: Hachette).

The Washington Post excerpts Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years by Julie Andrews with Emma Walton Hamilton (Hachette; LJ starred review).

Vanity Fair excerpts Find Me by André Aciman (FSG; LJ starred review).

Salon highlights Why Trust Science? by Naomi Oreskes (Princeton).

Time features Christopher McDougall, Running with Sherman: The Donkey with the Heart of a Hero (Knopf).

io9 previews the new Magicians comic by Lev Grossman and Lilah Sturgess.

NPR showcases California Concrete: A Landscape of Skateparks by Amir Zaki (Merrell Publishers).

People spotlights To the Moon and Back for You by Emilia Bechrakis Serhant, illustrated by EG Keller (Random House Books for Young Readers).

Billy Jensen writes “When True Crime Gets Personal” for Vulture.

The NYT debates if “Rihanna’s ‘Visual Autobiography’ [is] a Triumph or a Tease?” Also, Jane Smiley writes about St. Louis and Vashti Harrison, Think Big, Little One (LB Kids: Hachette), offers a tour of her studio.

In forthcoming book news, Viking announces that the next Sue Monk Kidd book will publish in April, The Book of Longings. The NYT has details.

In buzzy book news, Karen Kingsbury announces her newest book, Someone Like You (Atria: S. & S., May 2020), sending sales soaring. Brittany Williams posts on Instagram and gets her followers to buy many copies of Instant Loss: Eat Real, Lose Weight: How I Lost 125 Pounds—Includes 100+ Recipes (HMH).

The Irish Times reports that John Banville was the victim of a hoax call that he won the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Alfred Regnery (who ran the conservative Regnery Publishing) and Eric Kampmann are launching Republic Book Publishers, a new publishing company for right-wing titles.

Students at Georgia Southern University burn the book Make Your Home Among Strangers by Jennine Capó Crucet (St. Martin’s Press: Macmillan) after she spoke on campus about white privilege. The Washington Post also reports some students trolled Crucet on Twitter.

Author and editor Richard Jackson has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Poet John Giorno has died. Lambda Literary has an obituary.

Authors on Air

NPR interviews Edna O’Brien, Girl (FSG: Macmillan; LJ starred review). Also, an interview with Elizabeth Strout, Olive, Again (Random House; LJ starred review). There is one with Ronan Farrow, Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators (Little, Brown: Hachette) and one with Bill Bryson, The Body: A Guide for Occupants (Doubleday: Random House). Lastly, an interview with Elton John, Me (Henry Holt: Macmillan).

PBS News-Hour interviews John Barelli, Stealing the Show: A History of Art and Crime in Six Thefts (Lyons Press).

CBS Sunday Morning features Elton John, Me (Henry Holt: Macmillan).

CBS Sixty Minutes features Michael Pollan, How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence (Penguin), sales jump.

Deadline reports that the webcomic Lore Olympus is headed to the small screen. Also, an in-depth report on The Walking Dead. Neil Cross’s Burial is set for ITV, while Baghdad Central, based on the book by Elliott Colla, is set for Hulu. Sony is adapting Cinderella, with Billy Porter to star as the fairy godmother. Edward Norton talks about getting Motherless Brooklyn to the screen. The first new work of Bob Weinstein will be inspired by Endangered by Tim Flach. Donald L. Miller’s Masters of the Air: America’s Bomber Boys Who Fought the Air War Against Nazi Germany is set for Apple, with Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks to executive produce.

Dolittle, now renamed from the original title The Voyage of Doctor Dolittle and based on the books by Hugh Lofting, gets a trailer.

Earthquake Bird, based on the book by Susanna Jones, gets a trailer.

Ronan Farrow, Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators (Little, Brown: Hachette), will be on The View today. Vern Yip, Vern Yip's Vacation at Home: Design Ideas for Creating Your Everyday Getaway (Running Press: Hachette), will be on Live with Kelly and Ryan. Howard Stern, Howard Stern Comes Again (S. & S.), will be on Ellen.

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