Resources for Cultivating an Antiracist Mindset

The death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers not only resulted in protests throughout the country, it also forced many non-Black Americans to finally grapple with the realization that Black lives are systemically devalued. To help readers learn to recognize and combat systemic racism, several institutions and organizations are making resources readily available.

Note: LJ updated this post on June 25 to add an entry on Overdrive's Black Lives Matter: Community Read.


The death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers not only resulted in protests throughout the country, it also forced many non-Black Americans to finally grapple with the realization that Black lives are systemically devalued. Structural racism isn’t limited to police forces—it’s woven into the fabric of every aspect of our lives, from courtrooms to schools to hospitals and beyond. To help readers learn to recognize and combat systemic racism, several institutions and organizations are making resources readily available.

Black Lives Matter: Community Read, Overdrive
Overdrive has started a new program that spotlights #OwnVoices titles such as Angie Thomas's The Hate U Give that will help readers consider race and racism. Overdrive will make these titles freely available to libraries, and there will be no wait lists or holds. 

Blkfreedom.org
In honor of the 155th anniversary of Juneteenth, six Black museums are launching a site aimed at observing this holiday, which commemorates the day on which Union army general Gordon Granger read aloud federal orders announcing the freedom of all enslaved people in Texas. Resources will include fact cards as well as a video, Juneteenth: Black Freedom, live-streaming on Friday, June 19, at 12 p.m. EDT and featuring Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden, the first woman and African American to lead the national library, among others.

Book cover stamped from the beginninghoopla digital
Sales of books on antiracism and systemic racism are soaring; in response, hoopla digital presents relevant titles aimed at kids, teens, and adults, including Jerry Craft’s Newbery-winning graphic novel, New Kid, which explores microaggressions and privilege through the experiences of a Black student entering a predominantly white private school; Ibram X. Kendi’s National Book Award–winning Stamped from the Beginning, which untangles the long history of racism in America; and Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, a groundbreaking study of racial injustice in our penal system.

Muse in Focus: Confronting Structural Racism
These articles and books from a variety of academic presses explore white privilege and supremacy, racial violence, and the intersections of race and gender.

Racism in America
From a look at the Black Panthers to an exploration of Reconstruction to the Frontline episode “Policing the Police,” PBS spotlights documentaries and programs that provide historical context for racism and urge viewers to continue to fight injustice.

Book cover for Digitize and PunishReading for Racial Justice, University of Minnesota
From now through the end of August, the University of Minnesota offers free access to books that explore the impact of structural racism, such as Brian Jefferson’s Digitize and Punish and Anthony Ryan Hatch’s Blood Sugar.

Structural Racism and Police Violence, SAGE
SAGE curates articles examining the impact of systemic racism in education, law enforcement, and health care, as well as ways to address these injustices, such as restorative justice and activism.

 “Talking About Race” Web Portal, National Museum of African American History and Culture
This online portal offers online exercises, tools, scholarly articles, and other resources aimed at parents and educators to start difficult but vital discussions about race and racism.

Talks To Help You Understand Race in America, TED
Scholar and lawyer Kimberlé Crenshaw’s lecture on intersectionality, professor David R. Williams’s discussion of the impact of racism on health, and an interview with the founders of the Black Lives Matter movement are among the TED Talks here, dedicating to developing a deeper understanding of the effects of racism and how we can do better.

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Mahnaz Dar

Mahnaz Dar (mdar@mediasourceinc.com) is an Associate Editor for Library Journal, and can be found on Twitter @DibblyFresh.

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