Orwell Prize Winners Are Announced, June 26, 2019 | Book Pulse

The Orwell Prizes are announced. Authors write essays. Gender: Your Guide: A Gender-Friendly Primer on What to Know, What to Say, and What to Do in the New Gender Culture by Lee Airton gets called "a must-have for everyone." Anne Frank makes the news. Made for Love by Alissa Nutting and Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel are both headed to TV.

 

 

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Awards and Best Ofs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Burns, Milkman (Graywolf Press: Macmillan; LJ starred review), and Patrick Radden Keefe, Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland (Doubleday: Random House), have won the Orwell Prize.

CrimeReads picks “The Best Crime Books Of The Year (So Far).”

Reviews

The NYT reviews The Porpoise by Mark Haddon (Doubleday: Random House; LJ starred review): “a provocative and deeply interesting work.” Also, Lanny by Max Porter (Graywolf Press: Macmillan; LJ starred review): “hums throughout with hope and humor, the dark and the difficult are also always there.” Queen of the Sea by Dylan Meconis (Walker Books: Candlewick Press; SLJ starred review): “captivating … beguiling.” The Snakes by Sadie Jones (Harper; LJ starred review): “writes with cool, crisp prose about cruelty of many kinds; about class and race and power; and about regular people caught up in complicated situations that veer far out of control. She has an Ian McEwan-esque ability to provoke tension and anxiety.” The Most Fun We Ever Had by Claire Lombardo (Doubleday: Random House): “engrossing.” The Patient Assassin: A True Tale of Massacre, Revenge, and India's Quest for Independence by Anita Anand (Scribner: S. & S.): “provides a revealing look at the brutality and oppression of British rule, and how it seeded the desire for retribution in the hearts of so many Indians.” Never a Lovely So Real: The Life and Work of Nelson Algren by Colin Asher (W.W. Norton): “absorbing … This biography provides an invaluable introduction.”

The Washington Post reviews Gender: Your Guide: A Gender-Friendly Primer on What to Know, What to Say, and What to Do in the New Gender Culture by Lee Airton (Adams Media: S. & S.; LJ starred review): “a must-have for everyone.” Also, Very Nice by Marcy Dermansky (Knopf; LJ starred review): “light, enjoyable fare … a story of sex and intrigue set amid rich people in a beautiful house with a picturesque swimming pool … But maybe it’s more than that.”

Entertainment Weekly reviews Recursion by Blake Crouch (Crown: Random House; LJ starred review), giving it a B+, suggesting it as a summer read, and writing “he breathes fresh life into the matters with a mix of heart, intelligence, and philosophical musings, as the reader is invited to ponder the importance of memory to, well, everything.”

NPR reviews Ask Again, Yes by Mary Beth Keane (Scribner: S. & S.): “one of the most unpretentiously profound books I've read in a long time.” Also, I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution by Emily Nussbaum (Random House): “a collection of 32 brilliant, generous essays.” The Gone Dead by Chanelle Benz (Ecco: Harper; LJ starred review): “an excellent novel from an author who writes with real grace and a wisdom beyond her years.”

Briefly Noted

The Washington Post writes about Anne Frank: The Collected Works (Bloomsbury Continuum: Macmillan), “there are the hundreds of letters, fables and short stories that reveal an extraordinarily gifted and precocious young writer describing how she saw the world — real and imagined, pedestrian and eerie — as the walls closed in on her faith, then her country, then her family, and then her.”

The NYT remembers Iris Murdoch on her centenary.

Bustle features “21 New Memoirs That Will Inspire, Motivate, And Captivate You This Summer.”

Book Marks collects reviews from “Every 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidate’s Memoir.”

Book Riot gathers “50 Must-Read Queer Romance Novellas” as well as “7 New Comics By Novelists You Love.”

Time features Hungry: Eating, Road-Tripping, and Risking It All with the Greatest Chef in the World by Jeff Gordinier (Tim Duggan: Random House) and excerpts The Drama of Celebrity by Sharon Marcus (Princeton).

Bustle excerpts What I Carry by Jennifer Longo (Random House Books for Young Readers).

Mary Norris, Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen (W.W. Norton), writes an essay for the NYT on writer’s obsessions.

Lauren Mechling, How Could She (Viking: Penguin), writes an essay about generational friendships for O: The Oprah Magazine.

Stephanie Merritt, While You Sleep (Pegasus: W.W.Norton), writes an essay for The Guardian on what an “all-female planet” might look like.

Book sales fall in the UK, while audiobooks surge. The Guardian has details.

Amazon writes back to the NYT.

The L.A. Times reports on a new book fair, LitLit.

Authors on Air

Made for Love by Alissa Nutting and Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel are both headed to TV, via WarnerMedia’s new streaming service. Entertainment Weekly has details.

The Lincoln Lawyer, based on Michael Connelly’s novel, is all set for CBS. James Bond 25 offers a first look. Deadline Hollywood has details.

NPR interviews Emily Nussbaum, I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution (Random House). Entertainment Weekly also has an interview.

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