Tayari Jones Wins the Women's Prize for Fiction, plus New Bestsellers, Jun. 6, 2019 | Book Pulse

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones wins the Women's Prize for Fiction. Stay Sexy & Don't Get Murdered: The Definitive How-To Guide by Karen Kilgariff, Georgia Hardstark leads seven new books onto the bestseller lists. Three Women by Lisa Taddeo (Avid Reader Press: S. & S.) tops the July Indie Next list. Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol is headed to NBC. The Handmaid's Tale gets focused attention.

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Stay Sexy & Don't Get Murdered: The Definitive How-To Guide by Karen Kilgariff, Georgia Hardstark (Forge Books: Macmillan) debuts at No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Queen Bee by Dorothea Benton Frank (William Morrow: Harper) gets the buzz at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Ask Again, Yes by Mary Beth Keane (Scribner: S. & S.) builds community at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Stiehl Assassin Terry Brooks (Del Rey: Random House) continues the Fall of Shannara series at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Sentence Is Death by Anthony Horowitz (Harper) solves the case at No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World by David Epstein (Riverhead: Penguin) opens at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Anthony Bourdain Remembered by CNN (Ecco: Harper) pays tribute at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Outrages: Sex, Censorship, and the Criminalization of Love by Naomi Wolf (HMH): "I don’t trust it ... can’t quite overlook Wolf’s distinguished career of playing loose with facts and the historical record." Also, The Ministry of Truth: The Biography of George Orwell's 1984 by Dorian Lynskey (Knopf): "wide-ranging and sharply written." The Pandemic Century: One Hundred Years of Panic, Hysteria, and Hubris by Mark Honigsbaum (W.W. Norton): "Time and again, pandemics have gotten a head start because we didn’t realize what we were dealing with."

NPR reviews On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong (Penguin; LJ starred review): "devastatingly beautiful ... a painful but extraordinary coming-of-age story about surviving the aftermath of trauma." Also, The War for Kindness: Building Empathy in a Fractured World by Jamil Zaki (Crown: Random House): "if you want a clarion call to action, this might not be it. If you want a wide-ranging practical guide to making the world better, then you're in luck." The Plaza: The Secret Life of America's Most Famous Hotel by Julie Satow (Twelve: Hachette): "provides an energetic timeline that embraces the chaos of history."

Entertainment Weekly reviews City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert (Riverhead: Penguin), giving it a B+ and writing that it "revels in the old-fashioned pleasures of storytelling."

The Washington Post reviews Mostly Dead Things by Kristen Arnett (Tin House Books: W.W. Norton): "skillfully and humanely captures the agony and confusion of surviving a loved one’s suicide ... smart and empathic." Also, Searching for Sylvie Lee by Jean Kwok (William Morrow): "a beautifully written story in which the author evokes the hard reality of being an immigrant and a woman in today’s world."

Awards

The Women's Prize for Fiction goes to An American Marriage by Tayari Jones (Algonquin: Workman; LJ starred review). The Guardian reports, as does NPR. Here are the short and long lists.

Disoriental by Négar Djavadi, translated by Tina Kover (Europa Editions) wins the Albertine Prize for best French novel published in America. LitHub reports. Here is the shortlist.

Briefly Noted

The July Indie Next list is posted. Three Women by Lisa Taddeo (Avid Reader Press: S. & S.) leads the choices.

The Millions picks "Must-Read Poetry" for June.

Vulture selects "The Best Books of 2019 (So Far)."

Tor.com posts Jo Walton's Reading List for May.

Book Marks has "5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week."

The New Yorker surveys "What We're Reading This Summer."

The NYT looks at "It Books" from past summers.

The Walking Dead comics get a big character ending. Entertainment Weekly reports, as does the NYT, and the paper also has an interview with the creator.

In forthcoming book news, Entertainment Weekly excerpts Darcey Bell's Something She's Not Telling Us (Harper).

USA Today reports on 3 Dimensional by Dwyane Wade (William Morrow: Harper), coming this fall.

Vogue writes that "Emily Doe, the anonymous woman who was assaulted by Brock Turner on the Stanford University campus in 2015, is writing a memoir," Untitled by Emily Doe (Viking: Penguin).

O magazine excerpts On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong (Penguin).

The L.A. Times looks at what the city is reading and surveys "A year in the life of the Cerritos Library Book Club for Adults."

The Guardian reports that elder abuse charges have been made against Stan Lee's "former manager and two other[s]."  The paper also writes that author Gareth Roberts has been dropped from Doctor Who: The Target Storybook by Terrance Dicks, et al. (BBC Books) due to offensive remarks.

The Washington Post features Marjorie Bowen's 1909 novel, Black Magic.

Librarian Patricia Battin, winner of the National Humanities Medal, has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Dan Brown's The Lost Symbol is headed to NBC. Also, Thelma the Unicorn by Aaron Blabey is headed to Netflix as an animated musical. Danny DeVito has bought rights to Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation by Dan Fagin. Wonder Woman gets a new costume, and a look back at her older outfit iterations. Deadline Hollywood has details.

Variety reports that Solitary: Unbroken by Four Decades In Solitary Confinement, My Story of Transformation and Hope by Albert Woodfox is getting adapted for the movies, with Mahershala Ali to executive produce and star

The Hollywood Reporter features the making of the Sharp Objects adaptation.

Vanity Fair explores "Why the Dark Phoenix Saga Matters."

The NYT writes about the adaptation of The Handmaid's Tale. Vanity Fair has "9 Dystopian TV Shows to Fall Into After The Handmaid's Tale." Vanity Fair also has an interview with star Elisabeth Moss. The Guardian writes "In the third season ... the writers are asking us to feel empathy for villainous characters, a final straw for a show that’s already outstayed its welcome." The Atlantic has a story too.

PBS News Hour interviews Jim Derogatis, Soulless: The Case Against R. Kelly (Abrams).

The Guardian Books podcast celebrates the Hay festival.

CrimeReads picks "12 True Crime Podcasts To Listen To this Summer."

Sweetbitter, season 2 gets a trailer.

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Author Image
Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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Posted : Jul 01, 2019 08:50


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