New Bestsellers, June 20, 2019 | Book Pulse

Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner leads 10 new books onto the bestseller lists. The Wheel of Time and the Bridgerton adaptation get notable cast members. The Society of Authors award winners and the Desmond Elliott Prize winner are announced.

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner (Atria: S. & S.) debuts at No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Tom Clancy Enemy Contact by Mike Maden (G.P. Putnam’s Sons: Penguin) tracks down a leak at No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Oracle by Clive Cussler, Robin Burcell (G.P. Putnam’s Sons) hunts for treasure at No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Recursion by Blake Crouch (Crown: Random House; LJ starred review) shifts reality at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Summer Guests by Mary Alice Monroe (Gallery: S. & S.) takes shelter at No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Songs of America: Patriotism, Protest, and the Music That Made a Nation by Jon Meacham and Tim McGraw (Random House) holds a note at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America by Jim Acosta (Harper) asks a question at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say) by Elaine Welteroth (Viking: Penguin) opens at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How to Skimm Your Life by The Skimm (Ballantine: Random House) offers advice at No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission That Flew Us to the Moon by Charles Fishman (S. & S.; LJ starred review) aims skyward at No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews two books that examine “The Legacy of Slavery in … the American South.” Also, My Parents: An Introduction / This Does Not Belong to You: An Introduction by Aleksandar Hemon (MCD: Macmillan): “Of the two halves, “My Parents” is the more conventionally straightforward ... warm, wry and loving … “This Does Not Belong to You” is rawer and stranger.”

Entertainment Weekly reviews Fleishman Is in Trouble by Taffy Brodesser-Akner (Random House), giving it an A- and writing “genuinely, unexpectedly profound.”

The Washington Post reviews The Burning Chambers by Kate Mosse (Minotaur: Macmillan): “stirring … deeply satisfying, richly imagined.”

USA Today reviews Patron Saints of Nothing by Randy Ribay (Kokila: Penguin), giving it 3.5 stars and writing, “Ribay’s novel is not one to miss. It's a perfect balance of an immigrant story, an American story and a story of grief, woven together by the perspective of a teenage boy trying to understand his family and himself.”

NPR reviews FKA USA by Reed King (Flatiron Book: Macmillan): “a weird, loud, violent, funny, profane journey across the blasted ruin of our future from the first word to the last, that never pretends to be anything else.” Also, Reviving Ophelia 25th Anniversary Edition: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls by Mary Pipher, PhD, Sara Gilliam (Riverhead: Penguin): “a cultural touchstone and, almost inevitably, even a revamp carries the air of a cultural artifact. If it makes for occasionally creaky reading, maybe that's just growing pains.” A Spectral Hue by Craig Laurance Gidney (Word Horde): “In one sense, it's a quiet, confidently told tale of identity — gay, black, artistic, and ancestral — that resonates on a wholly realistic level. In another, it's a hybrid of horror, folklore, dark fantasy, and magic realism that whispers and twists.”

Briefly Noted

Vulture profiles Sherrilyn Kenyon.

The Washington Post features Linda Holmes, Evvie Drake Starts Over (Ballantine: Random House), and her “D.C. Dream Day with a four-legged friend.”

The L.A. Times talks libraries with Susan Orlean.

Denise Mina, Conviction (Mulholland Books: Hachette), goes “By the Book” for the NYT.

Electric Lit gathers “10 Exuberantly Queer Graphic Novels.”

The Millions suggests ten horrifying horror novels.

Book Marks has “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

CrimeReads picks “The Best Political Thrillers Coming Out This June.”

The Society of Authors award winners are announced.

Claire Adam wins the Desmond Elliott Prize for Golden Child (SJP for Hogarth: Random House). The Bookseller has details.

The Washington Post considers the draw of Sherlock Holmes.

The Atlantic talks with Nara B. Milanich, Paternity: The Elusive Quest for the Father (Harvard).

The NYT reports that historians have found a new Bible owned by Abraham Lincoln.

Rowman & Littlefield Acquires Prometheus Books.

William Loverd has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Vanity Fair has a first look at the forthcoming Little Women film.

Vulture runs down 15 fantasy adaptations headed to TV.

Downton Abbey gets a tie-in book for the film. Entertainment Weekly has details.

Christmas Camp by Karen Schaler is getting adapted by Hallmark. Schaler wrote the screenplay to the holiday hit A Christmas Prince. Bustle has details.

The Wheel of Time casts up, with Rosamund Pike to star as Moiraine. Julie Andrews will be the voice of Lady Whistledown in Shonda Rhimes's adaptation of the Julia Quinn Bridgerton series. Netflix is adapting Nightbooks by J. A. White. Deadline Hollywood has details.

Jim Acosta, The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America (Harper), will be on with Jimmy Kimmel.

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