Reading Women | Wyatt's World

March was both National Reading Month and Women’s History Month, but celebrating works by women should be a year-round venture. Here are five selections to add to your end-of-summer reading lists. 

March was both National Reading Month and Women’s History Month, but celebrating works by women should be a year-round venture. Here are five selections to add to your end-of-summer reading lists. 


  • These Ghosts Are Family by Maisy Card (S. & S.).
    Card’s spellbinding saga traces eight generations of the Paisley family by way of Jamaica's colonial history, the presence of ghosts, and the legacy of slavery, spinning a potent, haunting first novel delivered with great power.
     
  • Temporary by Hilary Leichter (Coffee House).
    Leichter’s funny, offbeat novel also features a ghost, one who offers advice. The author's smart take on the workplace—or that which has become the workplace in the seemingly impossible modern world of late capitalism—features a temporary worker with a host of boyfriends, a long employment history, and an odd collecting habit.
     
  • The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai (Algonquin).
    This is both the first novel by the Vietnamese poet Quế Mai and her first work to be written in English. Here, Quế Mai recounts the chronicle of the Trần family over 50 years, from the 1920s forward, using the Vietnam War as a grim and reverberating pivot.
     
  • Yellow Bird: Oil, Murder, and a Woman's Search for Justice in Indian Country by Sierra Crane Murdoch (Random).
    Mixing true crime and immersion journalism, Murdoch’s nonfiction debut recounts the disappearance of a truck driver from the badlands of North Dakota. The story is really the tale of Lissa Yellow Bird, who investigates the case, and of the complex judicial, economic, and cultural landscapes of North Dakota.
     
  • Valentine by Elizabeth Wetmore (Harper).
    Set in 1970s small-town Texas, but as modern as today’s headlines, Wetmore’s striking debut novel explores violence against women, issues of racial and social justice, and divided communities. It is full of women’s voices, and written with a compellingly strong vision.

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