Joy Harjo & Téa Obreht Shine, Aug. 14, 2019 | Book Pulse

An American Sunrise: Poems by Joy Harjo is the book of the day, getting glowing reviews and focused attention. Inland by Téa Obreht continues to make strides. Kochland: The Secret History of Koch Industries and Corporate Power in America by Christopher Leonard is also getting strong buzz. The trailer for Little Women is out and is trending on YouTube.

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Book Lists

USA Today offers “Your memoir reading list: Educated and five others that humble and inspire.”

The NYT runs its summer horror column. Also, the paper has a list of “Recent audiobooks of note.”

Vanity Fair collects “The Best Books To Take On Your August Vacation.”

Paste picks “The Best Young Adult Novels of August 2019.”

CrimeReads names “August's Best Debut Novels.”

B&N picks Inland by Téa Obreht (Random House; LJ starred review) as its August Book Club title.

BBC Culture selects “Ten books to read this August.”

EarlyWord posts its GalleyChat list for August. The September chat will take place on Tues., Sept. 10th, 4 to 5 pm.

Words Without Borders has booksellers “Recommend Their Favorite Books in Translation.”

Reviews

NPR reviews The Yellow House by Sarah M. Broom (Grove Press): “gorgeous … reads as elegy and prayer.” Also, Kochland: The Secret History of Koch Industries and Corporate Power in America by Christopher Leonard (S. & S.; LJ starred review): “this is fast-paced business history. An episode about ammonia runoff at an oil refinery keeps you turning pages like a John Grisham thriller.” It is soaring on Amazon.

The Washington Post reviews An American Sunrise: Poems by Joy Harjo (W.W. Norton): “stunning.” Also, The Vexations by Caitlin Horrocks (Little, Brown: Hachette; LJ starred review): “[an] unusual, quietly beautiful meditation.”

USA Today reviews Inland by Téa Obreht (Random House; LJ starred review), giving it 3.5 stars and writing that the “American Southwest [has] rarely if ever [been mythologized] with the sort of giddy beauty Téa Obreht brings to the page.”

In The NYT author Casey Cep reviews The Dearly Beloved by Cara Wall (S. & S.; LJ starred review): “more satisfying as a novel of marriage than of religion.” Author Elizabeth Wein reviews The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee (G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers: Penguin; SLJ starred review): “holds a mirror to our present issues while giving us a detailed and vibrant picture of life in the past.” Also, The Merciful Crow by Margaret Owen (Henry Holt: Macmillan): “a ferocious, exhilarating narrative. Full of romance and suspense, this is a tale that will leave readers hungry for the next book in the series.” Kochland: The Secret History of Koch Industries and Corporate Power in America by Christopher Leonard (S. & S.; LJ starred review): “a corporate history, lucidly told.” An American Sunrise: Poems by Joy Harjo (W.W. Norton): “tribal history and retrieval. Harjo writes of ancestral lands and culture, and their loss, through personal, mythic and political lenses.”

Briefly Noted

The Bookseller has the longlist for the FT/McKinsey Business Book award

Ball of Collusion: The Plot to Rig an Election and Destroy a Presidency by Andrew C. McCarthy (Encounter Books) is soaring on Amazon, after coverage by the National Review, Rush Limbaugh, and The Washington Times. The Immoral Majority: Why Evangelicals Chose Political Power over Christian Values by Ben Howe (Broadside Books: Harper) is also climbing the charts after a push from Morning Joe.

The Guardian writes “Too busy? Distracted by your phone? How to love reading again.”

Entertainment Weekly excerpts If Keanu Were Your Boyfriend: The Man, the Myth, the WHOA! by Marisa Polansky, Jay Roeder, Veronica Chen, Mary Kate McDevitt (Little Brown: Hachette). Also, an excerpt from Name Drop: The Really Good Celebrity Stories I Usually Only Tell at Happy Hour by Ross Mathews (Atria: S. & S.).

Time interviews Téa Obreht Inland (Random House; LJ starred review).

Nylon excerpts Socialist Realism by Trisha Low (Coffee House Press).

Entertainment Weekly interviews Courtney Maum, Costalegre (Tin House: W.W. Norton).

Vogue features An American Sunrise: Poems by Joy Harjo (W.W. Norton). Elle also has a feature.

Brian Keene announces the reboot of the Clickers franchise.

Bustle reports “How We Need Diverse Books Changed The Literary World, According To 15 Publishing Pros.”

The NYT writes about bookcases as hidden doors.

Authors on Air

Deadline Hollywood reports that “Awkwafina has signed on to star in The Last Adventure of Constance Verity, a film adaptation based on the fantasy adventure novel written by A. Lee Martinez.” Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast is set for TV. Netflix lands Pyros, an adaptation of the SF short story “Tardy Man” by Thomas Pierce, with Reese Witherspoon to star.

NPR’s alt. Latino interviews Danyeli Rodriguez del Orbe, Amanda Alcantara, and Elizabeth Acevedo. NPR also interviews Ibram X. Kendi, How To Be an Antiracist (One World: Random House; LJ starred review).

 Entertainment Weekly talks with Cate Blanchett about the adaptation of Maria Semple’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette.

Little Women gets a trailer; it is trending on YouTube.

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