Remaining RWA Board Members Resign; Colin Kaepernick To Release His Memoir Through His Own Publishing Company | Book Pulse

Golden in Death: An Eve Dallas Novel (In Death, Book 50) by J.D. Robb leads 10 new books onto the bestseller lists. PEN America announces the career achievement honors for 2020. Colin Kaepernick is releasing a memoir through his own publishing company. Maggie Gyllenhaal is directing the adaptation of Elena Ferrante’s The Lost Daughter. The remaining members of the Romance Writers of America Board of Directors resigned yesterday.

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New Bestsellers

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Golden in Death: An Eve Dallas Novel (In Death, Book 50) by J. D. Robb (St. Martin’s: Macmillan) debuts at No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Crooked River by Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child (Grand Central: Hachette) opens at No. 3 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Museum of Desire: An Alex Delaware Novel by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine: Random House) holds No. 5 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Girl with the Louding Voice by Abi Daré (Dutton: Penguin) lands at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Snug: A Collection of Comics about Dating Your Best Friend by Catana Chetwynd (Andrews McMeel) closes the USA Today Best-Selling Books list for the week at No. 11.

Nonfiction

Open Book: A Memoir by Jessica Simpson (Dey Street Books: Harper) debuts at No.1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Brother & Sister: A Memoir by Diane Keaton (Knopf) holds No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

When Time Stopped: A Memoir of My Father's War and What Remains by Ariana Neumann (Scribner: S. & S.) takes No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Big Goodbye: Chinatown and the Last Years of Hollywood by Sam Wasson (Flatiron Books: Macmillan; LJ starred review) details the film at No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Book of Delights: Essays by Ross Gay (Algonquin: Workman) closes the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list for the week at No. 14.

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Nobody Does It Better: The Complete, Uncensored, Unauthorized Oral History of James Bond by Edward Gross, Mark A. Altman (Forge: Macmillan): “Those who’ve learned to embrace the work of sorting and discarding — a skill that being a Bond fan demands — will be rewarded by this frustrating but fascinating book.”

The NYT reviews The Mercies by Kiran Millwood Hargrave (Little, Brown: Hachette): “among the best novels I’ve read in years. In addition to its beautiful writing, its subject matter is both enduring and timely.” Also, Human Diversity : The Biology of Gender, Race, and Class by Charles Murray (Twelve: Hachette): “This book is for the believers. Rigorous readers, skeptics, the unindoctrinated — you won’t be persuaded.”

NPR reviews Golden Gates: Fighting for Housing in America by Conor Dougherty (Penguin): “Thinking big picture, Dougherty reflects on practical solutions with moral intent and community-mindedness.”

LitHub has “5 Reviews You Need To Read this Week.”

Briefly Noted

PEN America announces the career achievement honors for 2020. Winners include Tom Stoppard who will receive the PEN/Mike Nichols Writing for Performance Award, M. NourbeSe Philip who receives the PEN/Nabokov Award for International Literature, Tanya Barfield who receives the PEN/Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater Award, and Rigoberto González who receives the PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry.

The BolognaRagazzi Awards are announced for comicsPW has coverage.

LitHub prints Arundhati Roy’s 2020 Clark Lecture in English Literature talk.

O: The Oprah Magazine picks “14 of the Best Books to Read This February.”

CrimeReads picks “Six Nonfiction Books You Should Read This February.”

NPR offers a 2020 poetry preview.

Barbara Hoffert has more August titles in new four new Prepub Alert columns.

The L.A. Times reports that Colin Kaepernick is releasing a memoir through his own publishing company. He is also working with Audible.

Mental Floss has “25 Amazing Books by African-American Writers You Need to Read.”

USA Today reports that the “American Dirt backlash has book publishers reviewing their diversity efforts.” The story includes a listing of imprints dedicated to diverse voices including the forthcoming Heartdrum from Harper as well as One World at Penguin Random House, Simon & Schuster’s 37 Ink, and Harper’s Amistad Press. Also, The L.A. Times writes that “#DignidadLiteraria invites Oprah ‘on a mission to repair’ after American Dirt fracas.” LitHub has the invitation.

Entertainment Weekly runs its romance column.

Tor.com suggests “8 of the Swooniest Fantasy Romances.”

USA Today has the details of what a reporter learned from binge-reading J.D. Robb’s In Death series over five months.

The NYT features “The Rise of Palestinian Food,” highlighting a number of cookbooks.

The L.A. Times features Daniel M. Lavery, who has a new book out under his former name Daniel Mallory Ortberg, Something That May Shock and Discredit You (Atria: S. & S.). Autostraddle also has a feature. Entertainment Weekly has an interview.

Entertainment Weekly excerpts To Sleep in a Sea of Stars by Christopher Paolini (Tor Books: Macmillan).

Tor.com excerpts Trouble the Saints by Alaya Dawn Johnson (Tor Books: Macmillan).

Paste excerpts All This Time by Mikki Daughtry, Rachael Lippincott (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers).

Esquire interviews Jenny Offill, Weather (Knopf).

Jenny Han talks food with Eater.

O: The Oprah Magazine showcases A Beautiful Crime by Christopher Bollen (Harper) as well as Apeirogon by Colum McCann (Random House; LJ starred review).

The Washington Post highlights a 1924 book for Valentine’s Day, Still She Wished for Company by Margaret Irwin (Penguin).

Deadline writes about how Hollywood players are working in the comics sphere.

The Bookseller reports that all remaining board members of the RWA have now resigned. A special election will be held in March. Shelf Awareness also has a report.

The NYT considers Lauren Graham’s cultural diet. Also in the paper, Cheryl Strayed answers the NYT’s By the Book questions. Celeste Ng talks about the adaptation of her novel Little Fires Everywhere. The poem “At Least” by Ha Jin. Karl Ove Knausgaard writes about Anselm Kiefer. There is a feature on Alan Lightman and one on Dan Peres.

Coronavirus is impacting publishing schedules in the UK. The Bookseller reports.

The Guardian features booksellers “fighting back against the algorithm” with bespoke book subscriptions.

Far Out has “A 3,252-track playlist from Haruki Murakami’s personal vinyl collection.”

Authors on Air

NPR’s Fresh Air features an interview with Jill Wine-Banks, The Watergate Girl: My Fight for Truth and Justice Against a Criminal President (Henry Holt: Macmillan) and a review of Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line by Deepa Anappara (Random House).

Maggie Gyllenhaal is directing the adaptation of Elena Ferrante’s The Lost Daughter. Olivia Colman will star. An Aladdin sequel is in the works. The President Is Missing, the adaptation of the novel by President Bill Clinton and James Patterson, gets cast members. Zoran Drvenkar’s You is set for Sky TV. C. J. Skuse’s novel Sweetpea is headed to Sky Atlantic. Melissa de La Cruz’s 29 Dates heads to Disney+. Deadline has details on all.

The Guardian writes about the BBC adaptation of Agatha Christie’s The Pale Horse and its history.

Entertainment Weekly has a run-down of the “biggest changes from the To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You book to screen.” USA Today has a list as well.

PBS NewsHour interviews Isabel Allende, A Long Petal of the Sea (Ballantine: Random House).

BuzzFeed suggests “7 Young Adult Novels To Devour If You Loved Netflix's You”.

A trailer is out for The French Dispatch.

A trailer is out for The Letter for the King, based on Tonke Dragt’s novel of the same name.

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