New Bestsellers, Jul. 18, 2019 | Book Pulse

Under Currents by Nora Roberts tops eight new bestsellers this week. Rosewater by Tade Thompson wins the Arthur C. Clarke award. An essay by Langston Hughes not seen for decades gets republished. Gossip Girl gets a reboot.

 

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Under Currents by Nora Roberts (St. Martin’s: Macmillan) debuts at No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Knife: A New Harry Hole Novel by Jo Nesbo (Knopf) opens at No 6. on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Chain by Adrian McKinty (Mulholland Books: Hachette) lands at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Golden Hour by Beatriz Williams (William Morrow: Harper) makes the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list at No. 12.

Nonfiction

Three Women by Lisa Taddeo (Avid Reader/ S. & S.) debuts at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Justice on Trial: The Kavanaugh Confirmation and the Future of the Supreme Court by Mollie Hemingway, Carrie Severino (Regnery Publishing) takes No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

America's Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F. Kennedy Jr. by Steven M. Gillon (Dutton: Penguin) opens at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Dapper Dan: Made in Harlem by Daniel R. Day (Random House; LJ starred review) lands at No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

NPR reviews They Called Us Enemy by George Takei (Top Shelf Productions: Random House): ”despite the grimness of its subject matter … a lively, vibrant book.” Also, This Is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar, Max Gladstone (Gallery/Saga Press: S. & S.; LJ starred review): “[an] experimental, collaborative, time-travelling love-and-genocide novel.” The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead (Doubleday): “a perfect novel. The Nickel Boys is a beautiful, wrenching act of witness, a painful remembrance of an "infinite brotherhood of broken boys," and it proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that Whitehead is one of the most gifted novelists in America today." Escalante's Dream: On the Trail of the Spanish Discovery of the Southwest by David Roberts (W.W. Norton): “in those rare instances when he humors the sentiments of his own mortality — when he honestly confronts the limits of his latest adventure and affords himself the luxury of reflection — that Escalante's Dream finally comes to life.”

USA Today reviews Everything Below the Waist: Why Health Care Needs a Feminist Revolution by Jennifer Block (St. Martin’s Press: Macmillan; LJ starred review), giving it 3 stars and writing “Part science, part history and always personal, Block's dense and thoughtful book asks women to question everything they've been taught about their bodies.”

The NYT reviews The Weil Conjectures: On Math and the Pursuit of the Unknown by Karen Olsson (FSG: Macmillan): “beguiling … its focus, abstraction, odd hunches, blazing epiphanies — as a powerful intoxicant, a door to euphoria.”

Entertainment Weekly reviews Three Women by Lisa Taddeo (Avid Reader/ S. & S.), giving it an A- and writing it “reads like a nonfiction novel in the deeply embedded, richly detailed vein of Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood or Jon Krakauer’s Into Thin Air.” Also, Is There Still Sex in the City? by Candace Bushnell (Grove Press), giving it a C+, writing “By the time she gets to her own cautiously optimistic ending, even a faithful reader couldn’t help but wonder: Isn’t there more to sex than this City?

Briefly Noted

Rosewater by Tade Thompson (Orbit: Hatchette) wins the Arthur C. Clarke award. The Guardian has details (and the shortlist at the end of the article).

The BooktubeSFF Awards are announced. Locus has the list.

NPR features an essay by Langston Hughes not seen for decades.

Datebook charts “the sea change in diversity of children’s books, from the 1950s to now.”

Book Riot has a "Reading Pathway” for Colson Whitehead.

CrimeReads considers “The Evolution of Walt Longmire.”

Salon features On the Clock: What Low-Wage Work Did to Me and How It Drives America Insane by Emily Guendelsberger (Little, Brown: Hachette).

The L.A. Times selects books to mark the Apollo 11 mission. Tor.com showcases Mary Robinette Kowal and Ken Liu as they reflect on the landing. The Chicago Tribune has a whole collection list of astronaut titles.

Readers weigh in on the NYT list of The Best 50 Memoirs, with suggestions of their own.

Tor.com excerpts Cold Storage by David Koepp (Ecco: Harper).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Chosen by Kiersten White (Simon Pulse: S. & S.).

As the Eisner Awards approach, The Washington Post suggests seven comics to readers.

Tor.com picks “7 Horror Novels from the Heyday of Mass Market Paperbacks” and suggests “Five SFF Works Reminiscent of Andre Norton.”

Entertainment Weekly has a deep dive into Tom King’s Batman, as the comic builds up the the start of its “City of Bane” arc.

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.” Also, a “Point/Counterpoint” about Raised in Captivity: Fictional Nonfiction by Chuck Klosterman (Penguin).

Elle interviews Carrie Goldberg, Nobody's Victim: Fighting Psychos, Stalkers, Pervs, and Trolls (Plume: Penguin).

Salon interviews Daniel R. Day, Dapper Dan: Made in Harlem: A Memoir (Random House; LJ starred review).

Poet Claudia Rankine has a feature on privilege in the NYT Magazine.

NPR’S All Things Considered reports on social workers in libraries.

The NYT looks into Boris Johnson’s writing career. The Guardian wonders if another book, by another UK leader, derailed a politician.

Entertainment Weekly has a “what to expect” letter from its new editor in chief.

The Guardian reports on a poetry mapping project in the UK.

Lucette Lagnado has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Entertainment Weekly writes “How Arrow saved the TV superhero — and why it had to end.”

Gossip Girl gets a reboot on HBO Max. Deadline Hollywood reports.

The NYT wonders if we have “Hit Peak Podcast?” And suggests “a shakeout is nigh.”

PBS NewsHour has an annotated page from The House of Broken Angels by Luis Alberto Urrea (Little, Brown: Hachette).

Entertainment Weekly writes about the film version of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.

A trailer for Snoopy in Space is out.

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Author Image
Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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