New Bestsellers, Jan. 23, 2020 | Book Pulse

Lost by James Patterson, James O. Born leads nine new books onto the bestseller lists. American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins continues to make waves. The Edgar nominations are out. We Need Diverse Books announces the 2020 Walter Award winners and honorees. Amazon plans an Alex Cross TV series based on the works by James Patterson. Netflix plans an anime feature film spinning off from The Witcher.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

New Bestsellers

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Lost by James Patterson, James O. Born (Little, Brown: Hachette) debuts at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and at No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Sweep with Me by Ilona Andrews (independently published) cleans up at No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Securing Zoey by Susan Stoker (Stoker Aces Production) holds No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Conference of the Birds by Ransom Riggs (Dutton Books for Young Readers: Penguin) lands at No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Leadership Strategy and Tactics: Field Manual by Jocko Willink (St. Martin’s Press: Macmillan) debuts at No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope by Nicholas D. Kristof, Sheryl WuDunn (Knopf; LJ starred review) opens at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Running Against the Devil: A Plot to Save America from Trump--and Democrats from Themselves by Rick Wilson (Crown Forum: Random House) lands at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Uncanny Valley: A Memoir by Anna Wiener (MCD: Macmillan) makes No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

American Oligarchs: The Kushners, the Trumps, and the Marriage of Money and Power by Andrea Bernstein (W.W. Norton) closes the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list at No. 15.

As a side note, Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover (Random) is No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and has been somewhere on that list for 100 weeks.

Reviews

Entertainment Weekly offers a dual review of Children of the Land by Marcelo Hernandez Castillo (Harper) and American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins (Flatiron: Macmillan; LJ starred review) under the heading “Two new books tackle the border crisis with urgency (and not without controversy).” The L.A. Times writes about how “Latinx readers are tweeting their own parody narratives” of American Dirt on Twitter. BuzzFeed follows the controversy and so does Vox.

The NYT reviews My War Criminal: Personal Encounters with an Architect of Genocide by Jessica Stern (Ecco: Harper): “Karadzic weaponized history and identity to stoke hatred and fear and turn the people who listened to him into killers. Stern wants the truth to be more complicated and less banal than it is.”

The Washington Post reviews The Sun and Her Stars: Salka Viertel and Hitler's Exiles in the Golden Age of Hollywood by Donna Rifkind (Other Press: Random House): “writes engagingly and often passionately.”

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

The Edgar nominations are out.

We Need Diverse Books announces the 2020 Walter Award winners and honorees.

Barbara Hoffert releases the LJ Galley Roundup for Midwinter. Even if you are not travelling to Philly, the list provides insight into the books of the season and the titles publishers are putting PR money behind. Also from Hoffert, Prepub Alert looks at titles coming out in August.

Entertainment Weekly writes about Jessica Simpson’s new memoir, Open Book: A Memoir (Dey Street Books: Harper). Along with personal revelations of sexual abuse and addiction, she says she is releasing six new songs to accompany the book. USA Today also has coverage as does HuffPost and People.

Bitch Media has a list of “13 Graphic Novels Feminists Should Read in 2020.”

CrimeReads has “Seven Thrillers For Domestic-Suspense Lovers.”

Entertainment Weekly excerpts Saint X by Alexis Schaitkin (Celadon Books: Macmillan).

Paste excerpts Trouble the Saints by Alaya Dawn Johnson (Tor Books: Macmillan) and also The Mermaid, the Witch, and the Sea by Maggie Tokuda-Hall (Candlewick Press).

The Washington Post features Lo—TEK. Design by Radical Indigenism by Julia Watson, W—E studio (TASCHEN).

The NYT asks Charles Yu, Interior Chinatown (Pantheon: Random House), to answer the “By the Book” questions. In the "Inside the List" feature, the paper showcases the importance of books to Bryan Stevenson, Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption (Spiegel & Grau: Random House).

LJ announces its reviewers of the year.

Esquire looks at “The World’s Most Stunning Libraries.”

The Avalon Free Public Library in Avalon, NJ interviews Ann Napolitano, Dear Edward (The Dial Press: Random House).

USA Today reports that the copyright to The Great Gatsby will expire in 2021.

The NYT writes about how Virginia Woolf is inspiring fashion.

Terry Jones of Monty Python fame has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Deadline reports Amazon plans an Alex Cross TV series based on the works by James Patterson. Netflix plans an anime feature film spinning off from The Witcher, to be called The Witcher: Nightmare of the Wolf. Rosario Dawson will star in HBO Max’s DMZ. That is the adaptation based on the DC comic books by Brian Wood which will be directed by Ava DuVernay. Matt Damon will star in the film adaptation of Don Winslow’s The Force. Sandra Cisneros’s The House on Mango Street is headed to TV. Showtime is making a series based on Patricia Highsmith’s quintet of Tom Ripley novels. Matthew Baker's short story Lost Souls is headed to the movies

The Hollywood Reporter has news that Robyn Carr’s Sullivan’s Crossing series has been optioned.

Town & Country has a list of the important films of the Sundance Film Festival. Those with bookish connections include The Last Thing He Wanted, based on the Joan Didion novel, Shirley, about a couple working for the writer Shirley Jackson, and Wendy, a retelling of Peter Pan.

The Today show featured High Heals: How Two Women Found Their Footing in the Medical Cannabis Industry by Leslie Apgar MD and Gina Dubbé (High Heals).

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

TOP STORIES

LIBRARY EDUCATION

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

COMMUNITY FORM

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT

Kids are using VR to explore worlds and create new ones

Get connected. Join our global community of more than 200,000 librarians and educators.

Get access to 8000+ annual reviews of books, ebooks, and more

As low as $13.50/month