August Booklists Get In Gear, Jul. 31, 2019 | Book Pulse

August booklists get a one-day head start. Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior: Memoir of a Girlhood Among Ghosts is the next PBS NewsHour/NYT book club pick for August. Circe by Madeline Miller is headed to HBO. Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese, and Leonardo DiCaprio join forces for the adaptation of David Grann's Killers of the Flower Moon. The Walking Dead gets a trailer for its third, as yet to be named, series.

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August Lists Get in Gear

 

 

 

 

 

 

The NYT spotlights “11 New Books to Watch For in August.”

The Washington Post picks “The 10 books to read in August.”

Time has “11 New Books You Should Read in August.”

Tor.com gathers “All the New Sci-Fi Books Coming Out in August.”

Also, Entertainment Weekly issues its July Romance column.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Chances Are . . . by Richard Russo (Knopf): “less a mystery than an evocation of what happens when you subscribe to ‘the peculiarly male conviction that silence conveyed one’s feelings better than anything else.’” Also, Semicolon: The Past, Present, and Future of a Misunderstood Mark by Cecelia Watson (Ecco: Harper): “Don’t just learn the rules, her clever, curious book prompts us; learn to ask, whose rules (and to admire that semicolon while you’re at it).” Gods of the Upper Air: How a Circle of Renegade Anthropologists Reinvented Race, Sex, and Gender in the Twentieth Century by Charles King (Doubleday: Random House): a “resolutely humane book.”

USA Today also reviews Chances Are . . . by Richard Russo (Knopf), giving it 3 stars and writing it “may not be a perfect book, but there’s heart and beauty on every page.” Also, Someone We Know by Shari Lapena (Pamela Dorman Books: Penguin), giving it 3.5 stars and writing “Lapena’s prose is tight and the chapters unfold in staccato, unnerving and mirroring the hurried and scattered thoughts of the characters.”

The Washington Post reviews Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim (Knopf Books for Young Readers: Random House): “weaves a stunning tapestry of adventure.” Also, All the Wrong Moves: A Memoir About Chess, Love, and Ruining Everything by Sasha Chapin (Doubleday: Random House), calling the “The quest memoir … a balky beast” and deciding Chapin tames it well.

NPR reviews It Came from Something Awful: How a Toxic Troll Army Accidentally Memed Donald Trump into Office by Dale Beran (All Points: Macmillan): “Beran makes a convincing argument that we're all caught up in simulations of political change rather than actually affecting it.” Also, The Churchgoer by Patrick Coleman (Harper Perennial), writing it features “an empathetic, deeply complex, and fiercely self-critical protagonist.”

Briefly Noted

The Now Read This book club from PBS NewsHour and The New York Times has Celeste Ng suggest their next book. She picks Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior: Memoir of a Girlhood Among Ghosts (Vintage: Random House). Related, ending the NewsHour-NYT July book club focus, Luis Alberto Urrea, The House of Broken Angels (Little, Brown: Hachette), answers readers’ questions. Both books are soaring on Amazon.

The NYT interviews Hervé Tullet, the children’s books illustrator.

Entertainment Weekly interviews Ben Folds, A Dream About Lightning Bugs: A Life of Music and Cheap Lessons (Ballantine: Random House).

The Guardian features authors including Khaled Hosseini, Ocean Vuong and Neil Gaiman as they “recall their migrant journeys in protest at asylum seekers' treatment.”

Book Riot has a reading pathway for Primo Levi and LitHub has a feature on the author.

Jezebel writes about “The Problem of the Improper Pincess.”

CrimeReads posts “Korean Noir: A Guide to the Classics.”

The NYT features the late Doreen Gamboa Fernandez, who is “gaining a following among Filipino-American chefs for the way she explored the cuisine from the bottom up.”

The Washington Post features Anthony Bourdain’s Typhoid Mary (Bloomsbury).

The NYT writes about a short story by John Steinbeck, newly printed in English for the first time. It is “a funny tale about a Parisian chef whose cooking companion is a cat.”

Stephen Ammidown of the Browne Popular Culture Library wins the 2019 RWA Cathie Linz Librarian of the Year award.

LitHub has an essay on making a book cover and also, “How to Spend a Literary Long Weekend in Hartford, Connecticut.”

The Guardian rounds up “The Top 10 libraries in fiction.”

Agnes Heller has died. The NYT has coverage.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Laura Lippman, Lady in the Lake (William Morrow: Harper).

The Queer Eye 's Fab Five were on The Tonight Show last night. I Am Perfectly Designed by Karamo Brown, Jason "Rachel" Brown, illustrated by Anoosha Syed (Henry Holt: Macmillan) jumped to No. 2 on Amazon’s Movers & Shakers book list. Dog Man: For Whom the Ball Rolls: From the Creator of Captain Underpants (Dog Man #7) by Dav Pilkey (Graphix: Scholastic) featured on the Today show.

Dave Rubin, the political commentator (The Rubin Report on YouTube) has announced his book, Don't Burn This Book: Thinking for Yourself in the Age of Unreason (Sentinel: Penguin) on Twitter, predictably giving it a huge boost on Amazon.

Rufus Sewell and Kaya Scodelario will star in The Pale Horse, based on the Agatha Christie novel. Circe by Madeline Miller is headed to HBO. Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese, and Leonardo DiCaprio will join forces in the adaptation of David Grann's Killers of the Flower Moon.

The Walking Dead gets a trailer for its third, as yet to be named, series.

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Neal Wyatt

nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

Neal Wyatt is LJ’s readers’ advisory columnist, contributing The Reader’s Shelf, Book Pulse, and Wyatt’s World columns. She is the coauthor of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction, 3d ed. (ALA Editions, 2019). Contact her at nwyatt@mediasourceinc.com

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