Antiracist Titles Fill Bestseller Lists | Book Pulse

Over a dozen antiracist titles fill the NYT and USA Today bestseller lists. In new titles, The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett debuts at No. 1 on the NYT fiction list. J.K. Rowling writes a new essay. More Pride reading lists are published. Lambda Literary is hosting a series of readings and conversations to be posted on YouTube. The English PEN Translates Awards are announced. The Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award announces its finalists. 

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Antiracist Bestsellers

Over a dozen antiracist titles are on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list, the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list, and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list. The top titles are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review). It is No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon). It is No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review). It is No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review). It is No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor by Layla F. Saad (Sourcebooks; LJ starred review). It is No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Additionally, all but one of the fifteen titles on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list are antiracist or related titles. Half of the top ten on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list are. In the UK, The Guardian reports that “Bernardine Evaristo and Reni Eddo-Lodge have become the first black British women to top the UK’s fiction and nonfiction paperback charts.”

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett (Riverhead: Penguin) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Guest Book by Sarah Blake (Flatiron Books: Macmillan) opens at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 15 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Lies That Bind by Emily Giffin (Ballantine: Random House) takes No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

A Burning by Megha Majumdar (Knopf; LJ starred review) claims No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

United States of Socialism: Who's Behind It. Why It's Evil. How to Stop It by Dinesh D'Souza (All Points Books: Macmillan) opens at No. 7 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list (with a bulk order indicator).

Humankind: A Hopeful History by Rutger Bregman (Little, Brown: Hachette) holds No. 11 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Deviant's War: The Homosexual vs. the United States of America by Eric Cervini (FSG: Macmillan) closes the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list at No. 14.

Antiracist Reading Lists, News, and Collection Development/RA Resources

Publishers Weekly: “Antiracist Graphic Novel Reading List.”

Popsugar: “20 Books About Black Lives Matter and Civil Rights to Put on Your Essential Reading List.” Also, “5 Books About Race on College Campuses Every Student Should Read.”

Chicago Review of Books: “5 Books About Police Brutality.”

Entertainment Weekly: “Recommended movies, shows, podcasts, and more addressing systemic racism and police brutality.”

BuzzFeed: “17 Books To Read If You Want To Learn About Racism In Australia.”

The president and board chairman of the Poetry Foundation have resigned in the face of the sweeping and negative response to the foundation’s Black Lives Matter statement. The NYT reports the story.

The NYT has an update to the responses generated from #PublishingPaidMe.

Merriam-Webster is changing its definition of the word racism. CNN has a report about the citizen who prompted the revision.

Candice Carty-Williams writes in The Guardian, “Publishers want more black authors. Why have they silenced us for so long?

The NYT “Inside the List” column interviews Layla F. Saad and Ibram X. Kendi.

The NYT turns to poetry, asking “Fifteen poets [to] tell us about the verses and books they are reading, or that they hope others seek out.”

Reviews

The L.A. Times reviews The Equivalents: A Story of Art, Female Friendship, and Liberation in the 1960s by Maggie Doherty (Knopf): “Doherty’s rigorous history is an empowering reminder that to change ourselves, we must have systemic support outside ourselves  - institutional structures that reinforce the belief that all people are created equal, not just equivalent.”

NPR reviews You Exist Too Much by Zaina Arafat (Catapult): "At once complicated and engaging, this is the kind of debut novel that announces the arrival of a powerful new author who, besides writing beautifully, has a lot to say."

Lit Hub picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

J.K. Rowling posts: “J.K. Rowling Writes about Her Reasons for Speaking out on Sex and Gender Issues.” In the piece she reveals she is a survivor of domestic abuse and sexual assault. Her essay is getting wide coverage: USA Today, Entertainment Weekly (also a report on all the Harry Potter cast members who have spoken out against her statements, including Emma Watson’s new statement), The Guardian, The L.A. Times, and Vulture.

NPR has an essay about the hurt she has caused: “Harry Potter's Magic Fades When His Creator Tweets.” O: The Oprah Magazine writes “How My Harry Potter-Loving LGBTQ Family Is Grappling With JK Rowling's Transphobic Tweets.” Bitch Media writes “Safe and Seen: Leave Potter Nostalgia behind in Favor of Trans Authors.”

Book Riot suggests “20 Must-Read Happy Queer Books for Pride.”

Shondaland lists “18 Essential LGBTQ+ Books to Read for Pride Month.”

Lambda Literary is hosting a series of readings and conversations. All will be posted on YouTube.

The English PEN Translates Awards are announced.

The Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award announces its finalists.

BookPage offers a look at mysteries for June.

Vox suggests “Books to read when you’re feeling low-energy.”

Omnivoracious has Jennifer Weiner's 2020 summer reads list.

Barbara Hoffert posts new Prepub Alert pieces, pushing into December 2020.

The NYT writes that “The Debate Over the Word Fascism Takes a New Turn” in books and thought pieces published in recent years.

Electric Lit interviews Zaina Arafat, You Exist Too Much (Catapult).

Raina Telgemeier answers the NYT’s “By the Book” questions.

The NYT prints a graduation speech given by E.L. Doctorow nearly a decade ago: “Be brave. Be kind.”

Time reports on the rocky publication path of John Bolton’s new book. His lawyer claims White House censorship and states the book will be published on June 23.

Tor.com has original fiction from K.M. Szpara, “We’re Here, We’re Here.”

A new story collection from Rosamunde Pilcher, A Place Like Home, is in the works. It will publish in the US by St. Martin’s in 2021. The Bookseller reports.

Two forthcoming book announcements and book covers are out. Tor.com has a piece about Soulstar by C. L. Polk (Tor.com: Macmillan). io9 has a story on A Desolation Called Peace by Arkady Martine (Tor.com: Macmillan).

Michael Dirda has an essay about weeding his personal book collection. The Washington Post has the details.

The NYT features Ken Druse, Scentual Garden: Exploring the World of Botanical Fragrance (Abrams). It recently won one of the American Horticultural Society Book Awards. Here is the full list of winners

The Montgomery County School District in Virginia is delivering books to kids via drone.

The NYT reports on libraries reopening: “Libraries are figuring out everything from how to remain welcoming spaces to how to respond to changing reader behavior.”

Author and actress Whoopi Goldberg has been elected to the Board of Governors Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. So has Ava DuVernay. Vulture reports.

Tim Parks writes about literary categorization and will do so in three more articles for The New York Review of Books.

Lit Hub reports that “Before Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak was an incredible toy maker.”

Albert Memmi has died. The NYT has an obituary.

Authors on Air

A new trailer is out for DC comic’s Doom Patrol. Season two debuts on HBO Max on June 25.

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