Robin DiAngelo's 'White Fragility' Tops Bestseller Lists | Book Pulse

Antiracist titles continue to fill the bestseller lists. White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo tops the charts. In new title bestsellers, 28 Summers by Elin Hilderbrand tops a handful of books. Amazon and Tor.com pick their best books of the year thus far, and there are new summer reading lists out as well. A major book on Korean art is released. The Good Lord Bird is delayed to add context and Gone With The Wind returns with context.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Antiracist Bestsellers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antiracist titles remain on top of the bestsellers lists, reflecting slight shifting of specific title demand. Here are the top sellers across the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list, the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list, and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list:

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 1 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race by Beverly Daniel Tatum (Basic Books: Hachette): No. 3 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness by Austin Channing Brown (Convergent Books: Penguin; LJ starred review): No. 4 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (The New Press): No. 7 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor by Layla F. Saad (Sourcebooks; LJ starred review): No. 8 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime : Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide by Carol Anderson (Bloomsbury): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

We're Different, We're the Same (Sesame Street) by Bobbi Kates, illustrated by Joe Mathieu (Random House Books for Young Readers): No.9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Waking Up White by Debby Irving (Elephant Room): No. 10 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

28 Summers by Elin Hilderbrand (Little, Brown: Hachette; LJ starred review) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Devolution: A Firsthand ­Account of the Rainier Sasquatch Massacre by Max Brooks (Del Rey: Ballantine; LJ starred review) rampages at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

American Demon by Kim Harrison (Ace: Penguin; LJ starred review) holds No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

The Art of Her Deal: The Untold Story of Melania Trump by Mary Jordan (S. & S.) plays its hand at No. 10 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Hardest Job in the World: The American Presidency by John Dickerson (Random House) holds No. 13 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall, (Viking: Penguin) takes No.14 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The NYT’s “Inside the List” features Our Time Is Now: Power, Purpose, and the Fight for a Fair America by Stacey Abrams (Henry Holt: Macmillan).

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Exciting Times by Naoise Dolan (Ecco: Harper): “Dolan’s real concern: The things we do to stave off being left alone.” Also, Shadowplay by Joseph O’Connor (Europa): “a gorgeously written historical novel about Stoker’s inner life, his never-quite-expressed love for Irving and Terry, and the gradual creation of Dracula.” Tokyo Ueno Station by Yu Miri (Riverhead: Penguin): “eloquently indicts the myth of Japan as an awesome power of cultural and economic might.”

The L.A. Times reviews The Lightness by Emily Temple (William Morrow: Harper): “beguiling.”

The NYT reviews The True History of the First Mrs. Meredith and Other Lesser Lives by Diane Johnson (NYRB Classics): “a foundational text of the genre. First published in 1972, the book passed into obscurity and has been happily reissued this month, fresh as ever — a seething, stylish reclamation of a forgotten life.” Also, Muddy Matterhorn by Heather McHugh (Copper Canyon: LJ starred review): “McHugh demonstrates her genius with language in a non-elitist way. She is relatable, never writing from the lofty heights of the mountain, but walking alongside us, inviting us to play, to puzzle out the strangeness of language with her.” Korean Art from 1953: Collision, Innovation and Interaction edited by Yeon Shim Chung, Sunjung Kim, Kimberly Chung, and Keith B. Wagner (Phaidon): “the most significant English-language overview yet of modern and contemporary art on the peninsula.”

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

The editors at Amazon have picked their “Best Books of 2020 So Far.”

The reviewers at Tor.com have their own list: “Tor.com Reviewers’ Choice: The Best Books of 2020—So Far.”

The Strategist suggests “11 Books by Black Authors That You Can Preorder.”

O: The Oprah Magazine picks “28 of the Best Books to Transport You This Summer, Written By Women Around the World.”

Jasmine Guillory offers summer reads for Amazon.

PBS NewsHour lists “Summer reading lists for young people at a time of crisis.”

Electric Lit offers “11 Thrilling Procedurals That Don’t Involve Police.”

CrimeReads offers “6 International Crime Novels You Should Read This June.”

The Strategist has “The Best ACT and SAT Prep Books, According to Perfect Scorers.”

The Oregon Book Award winners are announced.

O: The Oprah Magazine excerpts The Pull of the Stars by Emma Donoghue (Little, Brown: Hachette).

In Electric Lit Laura van den Berg recommends "The Country" by Joy Williams.

The NYT prints the poem “Surveillance” by Sarah Kortemeier, as selected by Naomi Shihab Nye.

The L.A. Times features The Case for a Job Guarantee by Pavlina R. Tcherneva (Polity: Wiley).

The Cut has “Nicole Dennis-Benn on the Art That Shaped Her.”

The NYT has an essay about “Leo Tolstoy vs. the Police.” Also, a piece about the previously unpublished work by Louisa May Alcott, “Aunt Nellie’s Diary.”

In forthcoming book news, Grady Hendrix has two new books on the horizon with Berkley (PRH): The Final Girl Support Group coming next June 2021 and an untitled work set for 2022. Tor.com has more details. Don DeLillo will have a new book out on Oct. 20, The Silence (Scribner: S. & S.). Lit Hub reports.

Entertainment Weekly has “Becky Albertalli and Katie Cotugno talk YA fandoms and uncomfortable political conversations.”

The NYT interviews David Adjmi, Lot Six: A Memoir (Harper).

The Guardian reports on bookstores displaying books back-out, so readers can see the blurb on the back cover, rather than pick up a book they might not wish to buy.

The NYT has a feature on the intimate nature of publishing: “Books Are a Great Fit for Quarantine. The Book Business, Not So Much.”

The Bookseller reports that The Booker Prize Foundation has abolished the post of honorary vice-president. It had been held up until yesterday by Baroness Emma Nicholson. Calls started earlier yesterday for the removal of Nicholson over her "'homophobic' views.The Guardian has those details.

Children’s author Michael Rosen is now home, after suffering from coronavirus. The Guardian has a report.

Anthropologist, linguist, and dictionary author Robert Laughlin has died of coronavirus. The NYT reports.

Authors on Air

Showtime moves The Good Lord Bird to October, and will include “context around the abolitionist miniseries as the focus sharpens on the issue of systemic racism in the U.S.” Gone With The Wind returns to HBO with contextual videos. Half Way Home by Hugh Howey is set for TV. Julia Walton’s Words on Bathroom Walls is headed to the movies. Amazon is adapting Naoki Matayoshi’s Gekijo. The estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is suing over Enola Homes. A new film version of The Three Musketeers is in the works. Steve McQueen is creating a documentary based on Atlas of an Occupied City, Amsterdam 1940-1945, written by his wife Bianca Stigter. Njambi McGrath’s Through The Leopard’s Gaze gets optioned for TV. Deadline has details on all.

The Hollywood Reporter has news that author Lawrence Osborne is adaptation Jon Swain's cult River of Time for the movies.

Agnes Gomillion’s The Record Keeper is headed to the screen. ClickOrlando.com reports.  

The NYT reports on how Hamilton ended up on Disney.

Ibram X. Kendi, How To Be an Antiracist (One World: Random House; LJ starred review), will be on with Stephen Colbert tonight.

The Handmaid’s Tale, season four, gets a teaser. It starts again on Hulu in 2021.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?