Life Imitates Art for Stephen King | Book Pulse

Valentine by Elizabeth Wetmore leads eight new books onto the bestseller lists. More spring awards arrive, including The Walt Whitman Award and The Sheikh Zayed Book Awards. Patty Wong, the city librarian at the Santa Monica Public Library, has won the ALA presidency for 2021-2022. Don Winslow is everywhere. NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Stephen King, If It Bleeds. Nancy Pearl interviews Emily Nemens, The Cactus League. Hulu is adapting Zakiya Dalila Harris’s The Other Black Girl.

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New Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Valentine by Elizabeth Wetmore (Harper) opens at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Texas Outlaw by James Patterson, with Andrew Bourelle (Little, Brown: Hachette) debuts at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

It's Not All Downhill From Here Terry McMillan (Ballantine: Random House) lands on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 12.

Fate by Helen Hardt (Waterhouse Press LLC: S. & S.) closes the USA Today Best-Selling Books list at No. 12.

Nonfiction

More Myself: A Journey Alicia Keys (Flatiron: Macmillan) opens at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Front Row at the Trump Show by Joathan Karl (Dutton: Penguin) lands at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The First Time: Finding Myself and Looking for Love on Reality TV by Colton Underwood (Gallery Books: S. & S.) takes No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Mitch, Please!: How Mitch McConnell Sold Out Kentucky (and America, Too) by Matt Jones, with Chris Tomlin (S. & S.) closes the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list at No. 11.

Also making a lot of news, The Wizenard Series: Season One (New edition) by Wesley King. Created by Kobe Bryant (Granity Studios) is No. 1 on the Children’s Middle Grade Hardcover list. People is just one outlet that has coverage.

Review

The Washington Post reviews Temporary by Hilary Leichter (Coffee House Press): “a refreshingly whimsical debut that explores the agonies of millennial life under late capitalism with the kind of surrealist humor that will offer anxious minds a reprieve from our calamitous news cycle.” Also, Afterlife by Julia Alvarez (Algonquin: Workman; LJ starred review): “a quick read with big ambitions for the here and now.” Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall (Viking: Penguin): “Kendall’s essays repeatedly ask why the basic needs of so many women are ignored, and why women in need are so often blamed for their plight.”

The NYT reviews Notes from an Apocalypse: A Personal Journey to the End of the World and Back by Mark O’Connell (Knopf; LJ starred review): “it’s an exploration of a sensibility.”

NPR reviews I Don't Want to Die Poor: Essays by Michael Arceneaux (Atria: S. & S.): “The truths come hard and fast …Heartbreaking, hilarious, unapologetic and smart.”

LitHub has “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Tor.com has a reading guide to the Hugo finalists.

The Walt Whitman Award has been announced.

The Sheikh Zayed Book Awards are announced. LitHub reports.

The Colorado Book Award finalists are also released.

The CBC Short Story Prize longlist is announced.

Patty Wong, the city librarian at the Santa Monica Public Library, has won the ALA presidency for 2021-2022. In other ALA news, the new division Core, a combination of ALCTS, LITA, and LLAMA, has been approved. American Libraries has both stories.

Barbara Hoffert surveys October books in Prepub Alert.

The L.A. Times has an interview with Cynthia Ozick, who “will spend her 92nd birthday ‘contemplating mayhem’.” Also, a feature on Ross Thomas, author of Briarpatch (Impress Mystery).

Electric Lit interviews Karla Cornejo Villavicencio, The Undocumented Americans: A Homecoming (One World: Random House).

Shondaland interviews Candace Bushnell, Rules for Being a Girl (Balzer + Bray: Harper).

The NYT’s “Inside the List” column features Jen Gotch, The Upside of Being Down: How Mental Health Struggles Led to My Greatest Successes in Work and Life (Gallery: S. & S.). The “By the Book” interview is with Joseph E. Stiglitz, Rewriting the Rules of the European Economy: An Agenda for Growth and Shared Prosperity (W.W. Norton).

The NYT features Cho Nam-Joo, Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982 (Liveright: W.W. Norton).

The Atlantic spotlights Unworthy Republic: The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory by Claudio Saunt (W.W. Norton).

People features Nothing General About It: How Love (and Lithium) Saved Me On and Off General Hospital by Maurice Benard (William Morrow: Harper) as well as The Wellness Remodel: A Guide to Rebooting How You Eat, Move, and Feed Your Soul by Christina Anstead, Cara Clark (Harper Wave).

Tor.com showcases Greg Egan, The Best of Greg Egan: 20 Stories of Hard Science Fiction (Night Shade: S. & S.).

Popsugar writes “2020 Has a Diverse Lineup of LGBTQ+ YA Books — Here Are the Best Picks.”

Don Winslow has another piece in Deadline, this one titled “Scorsese & De Niro Doing ‘The Irishman’ Over ‘Frankie Machine:’ ‘I Blame Eric Roth’.”

Electric Lit publishes the short story "How to Pronounce Knife" by Souvankham Thammavongsa, as recommended by Vinh Nguyen.

Coronavirus Reading and RA/Collection Development Resources

Don Winslow, Broken (William Morrow: Harper), has a set of recommendations for “the best films, TV shows, and books for self-isolation.” There is also a feature on Winslow in the L.A. Times.

LitHub suggests “The 50 Best Contemporary Novels Over 500 Pages.”

Entertainment Weekly has another Quarantine Book Club entry.

For National Poetry Month, Entertainment Weekly asks authors to “share poems [that] bring you solace.”

Lena Dunham’s Verified Strangers is on Chapter 12 over at Vogue.

Publishers Weekly has a report on the toll the pandemic is taking on Indies.

A range of authors are doing readings via Zoom to support bookstores, via We Love Bookstores.

A range of grantmakers have created the Artist Relief grants, including the Academy of American Poets.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Stephen King, If It Bleeds (Scribner: S. & S.).

Nancy Pearl interviews Emily Nemens, The Cactus League (FSG: Macmillan; LJ starred review) on her Book Lust program.

NPR’s Short Wave interviews Brandon Taylor, Real Life (Riverhead: Penguin).

Hulu is adapting Zakiya Dalila Harris’s The Other Black Girl. Alan Temperley’s Harry And The Wrinklies is headed to the movies. Deadline reports.

Today features Magnolia Table, Volume 2: A Collection of Recipes for Gathering by Joanna Gaines (William Morrow).

Jon Meacham, The Hope of Glory: Reflections on the Last Words of Jesus from the Cross (Convergent Books: Random House), will be on with Stephen Colbert tonight.

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