PW Reports on the Best-Selling Books of 2020 (So Far) | Book Pulse

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett is BuzzFeed’s August book club title. Publishers Weekly reports on “The Bestselling Books of 2020 (So Far).” Food52 has the “The 10 Best Cookbooks of 2020...So Far.” The Strand Critics Awards nominees are announced. The Not the Booker prize season begins. Michael Cohen is planning a book, and in a new lawsuit claims he was sent back to jail because of it. Netflix is adapting Leave The World Behind by Rumaan Alam. It will star Julia Roberts and Denzel Washington.

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Reading Choices

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett (Riverhead: Penguin) is BuzzFeed’s August book club title.

Publishers Weekly has a report on “The Bestselling Books of 2020 (So Far).”

Food52 has the “The 10 Best Cookbooks of 2020...So Far.”

The “New & Noteworthy” column is out in the NYT.

Vulture suggests “25 Notable New Releases Over the Next Two Weeks.” The list includes books and one audiobook.

Debbie Macomber has summer reading picks for Amazon.

The BBC offers “The greatest summer novels ever written."

Gizmodo suggests that The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle (Tor.com: Macmillan) is a great read to re-visit right now.

Reviews

NPR reviews The Pull of the Stars by Emma Donoghue (Little, Brown: Hachette): “our first pandemic caregiver novel — an engrossing and inadvertently topical story about health care workers inside small rooms fighting to preserve life.” Also, Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell (Knopf): “the story O'Farrell weaves in this moving novel is timeless and ever-relevant.” The Answer Is . . . : Reflections on My Life by Alex Trebek (S. & S.): “presents some brief, compelling glimpses into Trebek's history and his straightforward approach to life.”

The Washington Post reviews The Color of Air by Gail Tsukiyama (HarperVia): “the beauty is in finding the balance.”

The NYT reviews Austen Years: A Memoir in Five Novels by Rachel Cohen (FSG: Macmillan): “thoroughly authentic, smart and consoling account of one writer’s commitment to another.” Also, The Pull of the Stars by Emma Donoghue (Little, Brown: Hachette): “arresting … page-turner.” Pew by Catherine Lacey (FSG: Macmillan): “a timely entry into the conversation this country’s been having for years about ‘otherness.’The Double X Economy: The Epic Potential of Women's Empowerment by Linda Scott (FSG: Macmillan): “tells powerful stories about how ‘equal economic treatment for women would put a stop to some of the world’s costliest evils, while building prosperity for everyone'.Waiting for an Echo: The Madness of American Incarceration by Christine Montross (Penguin): “It is impossible to read her captivating account without concluding that our various departments of corrections are themselves in intense need of correcting.” The Unidentified: Mythical Monsters, Alien Encounters, and Our Obsession with the Unexplained by Colin Dickey (Viking: Penguin): “fascinating, troubling, compassionate and — in the end — deeply thoughtful.” The Beauty of Living: E. E. Cummings in the Great War by J. Alison Rosenblitt (W.W. Norton; LJ starred review): “[an] account of the formative influences on Cummings’s life and work.” Baseless: My Searchfor Secrets in the Ruins of the Freedom of Information Act by Nicholson Baker (Penguin): “Baker’s search for the truth dissolves in his own prejudices and rampaging sense of moral superiority.” The Road from Raqqa: A Story of Brotherhood, Borders, and Belonging by Jordan Ritter Conn (Ballantine: Random House): “riveting.”

Briefly Noted

The Strand Critics Awards nominees are announced. Attica Locke, Don Winslow, and Laura Lippman all make the cut.

Nominations for the Not the Booker prize 2020 are underway again ... and about to close. The Guardian both announces the season and its very short voting window - Aug. 1.

Michael Cohen is planning a book, and in a new lawsuit claims he was sent back to jail because of it. His working title is Disloyal: The True Story of Michael Cohen, Former Personal Attorney to President Donald J. Trump. The Washington Post reports.

Chelsea Clinton has a new book on the way, She Persisted in Sports: American Olympians Who Changed the Game, illustrated by Alexandra Boige (Philomel Books: Penguin). USA Today reports.

Electric Lit interviews John Fram, The Bright Lands (Hanover Square Press: Harper).

Salon interviews Zerlina Maxwell, The End of White Politics: How to Heal Our Liberal Divide (Hachette).

The Millions interviews Adrian Tomine, The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist (Drawn and Quarterly: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

Collider interviews Neil Gaiman about the new Sandman adaptations occurring on Audible and Netflix.

O: The Oprah Magazine has “The Best Vampire Books to Read, Besides Twilight.”

Entertainment Weekly excerpts The Cost of Knowing by Brittney Morris (S. & S. Books for Young Readers).

The Hollywood Reporter excerpts A Star Is Bored by Byron Lane (Henry Holt: Macmillan).

Electric Lit excerpts Tiny Nightmares: Very Short Stories of Horror edited by Lincoln Michel and Nadxieli Nieto (Black Balloon Publishing) with the story “The Blue Room” by Lena Valencia.

The L.A. Times features Alex Trebek, The Answer Is . . . : Reflections on My Life (S. & S.). The Hollywood Reporter also has details. So does USA Today.

Vice spotlights Self Care by Leigh Stein (Penguin).

Variety features Total F*cking Godhead: The Biography of Chris Cornell by Corbin Reiff (Post Hill Press: S. & S.).

Elle showcases Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir by Natasha Trethewey (Ecco: Harper; LJ starred review).

The Guardian has a report on authors buying their way onto bestseller lists, and the wide-spread practice of gaming the lists. Also, a piece by Niamh Campbell about what it is like to be a young writer in Ireland today.

The NYT reports on the Book Review section, working from home, without access to physical books.

Josephine Cox has died. The Guardian has an obituary.

Authors on Air

Netflix is adapting Leave The World Behind by Rumaan Alam. It will star Julia Roberts and Denzel Washington. Apple and A24 are adapting The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson. Deadline has details.

HBO starts casting for its Game of Thrones prequel, House of the Dragon, which is based on George R. R. Martin’s Fire & Blood, and takes place 300 years before GoTEntertainment Weekly reports.

NPR’s Morning Edition features Linguist John McWhorter who says that Robin DiAngelo's White Fragility “Is Condescending Toward Black People.” Also, an interview with Alex Trebek, The Answer Is . . . : Reflections on My Life (S. & S.).

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