Colson Whitehead's 'The Nickel Boys' Wins Orwell Prize for Political Fiction | Book Pulse

The Orwell Prizes are announced. The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead wins for Political Fiction. In nonfiction it is Kate Clanchy’s Some Kids I Taught and What They Taught Me. Greyhound and The Old Guard lead a handful of adaptations this week. Kevin Kwan's Sex and Vanity is headed to the movies.

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July 10:

Greyhound, based on The Good Shepherd by C. S. Forester (Penguin). Apple+. Reviews | Trailer

The Old Guard, based on The Old Guard Book One: Opening Fire by Greg Rucka, Leandro Fernandez (Image Comics). Netflix. Reviews | Trailer. The NYT has a feature story on the director, “the first Black woman to make a comic-book film.”

First Cow, based on The Half-Life by Jonathan Raymond (Bloomsbury). VOD. Reviews | Trailer

The Epic Tales of Captain Underpants in Space. Based on the characters created by Dav Pilkey. Netflix. No reviews | Trailer

Hello Ninja. Based on Hello, Ninja by N. D. Wilson, Forrest Dickison (Harper). Netflix. No reviews | Trailer

July 15:

Brave New World, based on Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (Harper). Peacock. Reviews (scroll down) | Trailer

Reviews

NPR reviews Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Del Rey: Random House): “inventive and smart, injecting the Gothic formula with some fresh blood.”

The Washington Post reviews Want by Lynn Steger Strong (Henry Holt: Macmillan): “Strong writes convincingly of the desiccated American Dream, the hand-to-mouth existence of young adults in the recession’s shadow, but “Want” finds a white woman cruising the thoroughfares of black trauma before retreating to gentrified Brooklyn with a loan from her parents.” Also, Antkind by Charlie Kaufman (Random House): “[a] loopy, loony, 720-page raspberry of a first novel. A dyspeptic satire that owes much to Kurt Vonnegut and Thomas Pynchon.”

The NYT has a long, detailed review of Utopia Avenue by David Mitchell (Random): “fail[s] to meet the high standard Mitchell himself established early on.” Also, Butch Cassidy: The True Story of an American Outlaw by Charles Leerhsen (S. & S.): “his own one-man posse in pursuit of the charismatic outlaw.” Big Friendship: How We Keep Each Other Close by Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman (S. & S.): “thoughtful and highly readable.” The Rules of Contagion: Why Things Spread--And Why They Stop by Adam Kucharski (Basic: Hachette): “In this smart and engaging tour of epidemiology, written before the pandemic, Kucharski makes a convincing case that just as the arc of an epidemic depends on the transmissibility of a virus and a population’s susceptibility to infection, so online contagions obey similar rules.” "The Shortlist” has three books about “Modern Mothers and Daughters.”

The L.A. Times reviews Utopia Avenue by David Mitchell (Random): “With his huge electric brain, Mitchell has written his own solo scenius, one that draws connections between Edo-era Japan and a distant, post-human-collapse future. It’s a grand project, brilliantly executed and deeply humanist.”

Book Marks has “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week” and “The Best Reviewed Books of the Week.”

Briefly Noted

The Orwell Prizes are announced. The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead (Doubleday: Random House) wins for Political Fiction. In nonfiction it is Kate Clanchy’s Some Kids I Taught and What They Taught Me (Picador: Macmillan). The Guardian reports that story.

Mariah Carey announces a new book, The Meaning of Mariah Carey (Andy Cohen Books). Entertainment Weekly reports. EW also has a report on the paperback edition of Year of the Monkey by Patti Smith (Vintage: Penguin). Lastly, there is news about Lana Del Rey, who has a debut poetry collection, Violet Bent Backwards Over the Grass (S. & S.) forthcoming on Sept. 29, with an e-audio spoken word out on July 28.

The L.A. Times writes about Mary Trump’s Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man (S. & S.).

The NYT picks nine books for the week.

Tor.com offers “All the New Young Adult SFF Books Arriving in July.”

The L.A. Times interviews Lacy Crawford, Notes on a Silencing: A Memoir (Little, Brown: Hachette).

Time interviews David Mitchell, Utopia Avenue (Random).

The Millions interviews Sarah Gerard, True Love (Harper).

The Hollywood Reporter features Austin Channing Brown, I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness (Convergent Books: Penguin; LJ starred review).

A new Lit Hub Author Questionnaire is out, including Gabriella Burnham, David Goodwillie, Yiyun Li, and others.

Electric Lit has an essay entitled “We Get to Resist the Old Narratives of What It Means to Be Trans,” written by Sarah Cavar.

Roxane Gay has a Twitter session for the NYT that serves as a follow-up to her last op-ed and answers other questions too.

The NYT writes about how B&N is re-decorating in the face of the pandemic.

Authors on Air

The Hollywood Reporter writes that Kevin Kwan's Sex and Vanity is headed to the movies.

Netflix announces that The Crown will get a season six. Yahoo! has the news.

The Television Critics Association Awards nominations are out. Watchmen rakes in the most nods. Little Fires Everywhere, Normal People, The Mandalorian, The Morning Show, The Crown, and The Plot Against America also got nominations. Variety has the full list.

Deadline has the Comic-Con@Home schedule of film and TV panels. The Eisner Awards will be announced on Friday, July 24 at the virtual conference.

Deadline reports that Quibi will create Tomie, an adaptation of Junji Ito’s horror manga series. Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge  by Erica Armstrong Dunbar gets optioned. Archie Comics joins with Spotify for podcasts based on the Archie Comics universe. A Spy Among Friends by Ben Macintyre is headed to the small screen.

Vice has “An Ode to Claudia Kishi, the Coolest Kid in The Baby-Sitters Club.”

NPR’s Short Wave interviews Ainissa Ramirez, The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another (MIT Press).

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