Tana French Offers Sneak Peek of New Stand-Alone Novel | Book Pulse

If It Bleeds by Stephen King and Walk the Wire by David Baldacci trade the top two spots on the bestseller lists. Jasmine Guillory, Beverly Jenkins, Kwana Jackson, and Alyssa Cole talk about racism in the romance industry. Joy Harjo will serve a second term as U.S. Poet Laureate. Tana French previews her next book, The Searcher. PBS NewsHour and The New York Times pick The Street by Ann Petry as their May book club title.

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New Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

If It Bleeds by Stephen King (Scribner: S. & S.; LJ starred review) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Walk the Wire by David Baldacci (Grand Central: Hachette) opens at No.1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Book of Longings by Sue Monk Kidd (Viking: Penguin; LJ starred review) holds No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

First Comes Scandal: A Bridgertons Prequel by Julia Quinn (Avon: Harper; LJ starred review) lands at No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

I'm Your Huckleberry: A Memoir by Val Kilmer (S. & S.) debuts at No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Fierce, Free, and Full of Fire: The Guide to Being Glorious You by Jen Hatmaker (Thomas Nelson: Harper) holds No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Medical Medium Cleanse to Heal: Healing Plans for Sufferers of Anxiety, Depression, Acne, Eczema, Lyme, Gut Problems, Brain Fog, Weight Issues, Migraines, Bloating, Vertigo, Psoriasis, Cys by Anthony William (Hay House: Penguin) closes the USA Today Best-Selling Books list at No.14.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Had I Known: Collected Essays by Barbara Ehrenreich (Twelve: Hachette): “the Ehrenreich of this collection is Ehrenreich the activist, the author of startlingly prescient essays and scabrous op-eds. She was writing about the splintering middle class during the self-congratulatory Reagan years, and about problems of trickle-dow.” Also, Little Eyes by Samanta Schweblin (Riverhead: Penguin): “[her] most unnerving work yet.” Lastly, there is a look at books featuring mothers and daughters.

The Washington Post reviews What Is the Grass: Walt Whitman in My Life by Mark Doty (W.W. Norton): “excellent.

Book Marks has “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Jasmine Guillory, Beverly Jenkins, Kwana Jackson, and Alyssa Cole talk with O: The Oprah Magazine about racism in the romance industry.

Joy Harjo will serve a second term as Poet Laurate. She “will focus on a project called 'Living Nations, Living Words: A Map of First Peoples Poetry,' a digital interactive map featuring contemporary Native poets, including videos of them reading their work.” The NYT reports.

Tor.com features What Martha Wells Is Reading Right Now.”

Esquire reprints the 2016 short story from Curtis Sittenfeld, “The Nominee,” in which she fictionalized Hillary Clinton just as she does in the forthcoming Rodham (Random House).

Electric Lit has a short story suggestion, "On Growing Ferns and Other Plants in Glass Cases, in the Midst of the Smoke of London" by Daniel Mason, as recommended by Michael Ray.

Entertainment Weekly interviews Tana French and previews her next book, The Searcher (Viking: Penguin, Oct. 6, 2020).

People spotlights Stealing Home: Los Angeles, the Dodgers, and the Lives Caught in Between by Eric Nusbaum (PublicAffairs: Hachette). There is also a showcase for Hilarie Burton, The Rural Diaries: Love, Livestock, and Big Life Lessons Down on Mischief Farm (HarperOne).

Vox’s RA column is back with more book suggestions.

The Guardian reports on the online exhibit Women in Comics: Looking Forward and Back.

The NYT “By the Book” column features Michael Cunningham while the “Inside the List” column focuses on kids and cooking. The “Group Text” book club column highlights Sea Wife by Amity Gaige (Knopf). Also, the paper has more on the Alaskan town that got a lovely adverse reaction when they tried to censor classics like The Great Gatsby. So does The Guardian.

John Bolton’s book is pushed back to June. USA Today reports.

The L.A. Times writes about Bookshop.org.

Robert Mezey has died. The L.A. Times reports.

COVID-19 Reading and RA/Collection Development Resources

BuzzFeed picks “32 Short Story Collections That Will Cure Even The Worst Reading Slump.”

LitHub gathers “The Joys and Worries of 20 Writers During COVID-19.”

The Washington Post suggests “favorite escapist novels.” Also, the paper has a story on the poet and comedian Derrick C. Brown who offers “Goodnight America” via Zoom.

The NYT considers what quarantine home shots reveal about famous people’s bookshelves. The paper also reports on the online auction to support comics creators.

Authors on Air

PBS NewsHour and The New York Times pick The Street by Ann Petry (Mariner Books: HMH) as their May book club title. As the club wraps up its April focus, Julia Phillips, Disappearing Earth (Knopf), answers readers’ questions.

NPR’s Pop Culture Hour praises Normal People. HuffPost also weighs in, as does Bustle. Bustle also has a list of all the show’s songs. Esquire features one of the leads, actor Paul Mescal.

NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Frank M. Snowden, Epidemics and Society: From the Black Death to the Present (Yale). Code Switch features work by Danez Smith, Franny Choi, Kaveh Akbar, Natalie Diaz, and Jesús Ivan Valles and what it means “to count and be counted.”

Fox News features Front Row at the Trump Show by Jonathan Karl (Dutton: Penguin).

Claire North’s The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August is headed to the movies. Emma Brodie’s forthcoming Songs In Ursa Major has sold film rights. Deadline reports.

PBS NewsHour interviews Vivek H. Murthy, Together: The Healing Power of Human Connection in a Sometimes Lonely World (Harper Wave).

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