Stable Support

Voters spoke, and to a large extent, libraries continued to find support at the ballot box in 2018. After a striking level of wins in 2017, libraries on the ballot in 2018 have reset back to average historical pass/fail levels for a midterm election year—with a nonetheless healthy 79% passing overall.

Voters overwhelmingly backed level library funding, but winning investment in growth was harder.

Voters spoke, and to a large extent, libraries continued to find support at the ballot box in 2018. After a striking level of wins in 2017, libraries on the ballot in 2018 have reset back to average historical pass/fail levels for a midterm election year—with a nonetheless healthy 79% passing overall (90% passed in 2017). The 2018 election cycle was split between congressional primaries and the midterm elections in November. This report captures results of 157 library-related elections held across both. There are some notable variations in wins and losses among operating levies, building bonds, and annual budget votes: while those on operating expenses saw a very high rate of success, especially those that preserved the status quo, increases and building bonds saw a mixed response. Several library governance elections with counterintuitive outcomes are also included, as are a few same-year reruns in November of measures that failed earlier in the year. The whole story of library questions proves much richer than these high-level statistics tell.

TEN-YEAR TRENDS

 

OPERATING REFERENDA

BUILDING REFERENDA

YEAR

#

PERCENTAGE

#

PERCENTAGE

PASS

FAIL

PASS

FAIL

2018

109

88

12

41

61

39

2017

85

98

2

39

72

28

2016

121

86

14

47

68

32

2015

123

94

6

21

43

57

2014

147

81

19

33

73

27

2013

146

88

12

30

63

37

2011

96

88

12

18

44

56

2010

220

87

13

29

55

45

2009

123

84

16

28

54

46

2008

42

74

26

27

67

33

AVG

121

87

13

31

60

40

SOURCELJ PUBLIC LIBRARY REFERENDA 2018; the study was not conducted in 2012

OPERATING LEVIES & ANNUAL BUDGETS

Similar to recent years’ results, operating renewals and annual budget votes passed at a very high rate in 2018. Fully 96% of renewals passed. While renewals were solid, budget increase votes were varied; with only 70%, 26 of 37, passing. In New York and several other states in the Northeast, every single annual budget vote was affirmed. This high rate of voter approval for straight renewals (those with no increase or variance) is important to the overall financial health of the entire field, since around 40% of all public libraries nationwide are districts, joint powers authorities, or other types of governmental structures that require voter approval to create or renew taxing ability. These local levies, millages, measures, or annual budgets make up the bulk of library funding.

 

OPERATING REFERENDA 2018

LOCATION LIBRARY  RESULT  % YES % NO

CALIFORNIA

Oakland

 

Oakland Public Library

 

PASS

 

77

 

23

Sunnyvale

Sunnyvale Public Library

PASS

77

23

COLORADO

Bayfield

 

Pine River Library District

 

FAIL

 

50

 

50

Carbondale

Garfield County Libraries

PASS

73

27

Craig

Moffat County Library

FAIL

44

56

Thornton

Anythink Libraries

FAIL

48

52

ILLINOIS

Crest Hill

 

White Oak Library District (Mar. 2018)

 

FAIL

 

46

 

54

Crest Hill

White Oak Library District (Nov. 2018)

FAIL

40

60

Harvard

Harvard Diggins Library

PASS

53

47

Robbins

William Leonard Public Library District

PASS

62

38

LOUISIANA

Lafayette

 

Lafayette Public Library System

 

FAIL

 

47

 

53

Lake Charles

Calcasieu Parish Public Library

PASS

64

36

MASSACHUSETTS

Douglas

 

Simon Fairfield Public Library

 

PASS

 

50

 

50

MICHIGAN

Allegan

 

Allegan District Library

 

PASS

 

67

 

33

Augusta

Augusta-Ross Township District Library

PASS

67

33

Baldwin

Lake County Library

PASS

77

23

Cheboygan

Cheboygan Area Public Library

PASS

94

6

Coleman

Coleman Area Library

PASS

74

26

Colon

Colon Township Library

PASS

76

24

Dorr

Dorr Township Library

FAIL

37

63

Eaton Rapids

Eaton Rapids Area District Library

PASS

55

45

Fruitport

Fruitport District Library (Aug. 2018)

FAIL

48

52

Fruitport

Fruitport District Library (Nov. 2018)

PASS

60

40

Galesburg

Galesburg-Charleston Memorial District Library

PASS

59

41

Galien

Galien Township Public Library

PASS

65

35

Grosse Point

Grosse Point Public Library

PASS

74

26

Gwinn

Forsyth Township Public Library

PASS

69

31

Harrisville

Alcona County Library

PASS

65

35

Hastings

Hastings Public Library (Hastings Twp.)

FAIL

49

51

Hastings

Hastings Public Library (Rutland Charter Twp.)

PASS

55

45

Hesperia

Hesperia Community Library

PASS

62

38

Highland

Highland Township Public Library

PASS

62

38

Imlay City

Ruth Hughes Memorial District Library

PASS

58

42

Iron Mountain

Dickinson County Library

PASS

64

36

Lansing

Capital Area District Library

PASS

71

29

Manistee

Manistee County Library

PASS

73

27

Marquette

Peter White Public Library (Chocolay Twp.)

PASS

69

31

Marquette

Peter White Public Library (City of Marquette)

PASS

78

22

Marquette

Peter White Public Library (Marquette Twp.)

PASS

72

28

Marquette

Peter White Public Library (Powell Twp.)

FAIL

42

58

Marquette

Peter White Public Library (Sands Twp.)

PASS

68

32

Milan

Milan Public Library

PASS

74

26

Mt. Pleasant

Chippewa River District Library

PASS

79

21

Munising

Munising School Public Library

PASS

69

31

North Branch

North Branch Township Library

PASS

54

46

Port Sanilac

Sanilac District Library

PASS

70

30

Stevensville

Lincoln Township Public Library

PASS

61

39

Temperance

Monroe County Library System (Bedford Twp. Branch)

PASS

58

42

Thompsonville

Betsie Valley District Library

PASS

68

32

Vassar

Bullard Sanford Memorial Library

PASS

68

32

Wayne

Wayne Public Library

PASS

69

31

White Lake

White Lake Township Library

PASS

59

41

Ypsilanti

Ypsilanti District Library

PASS

67

33

MISSOURI

Kansas City

Kansas City Public Library

PASS

85

15

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Gilmanton

 

Gilmanton Year-Round Library

 

PASS

 

63

 

37

NEW JERSEY

Vineland

 

Vineland Public Library

 

FAIL

 

50

 

50

NEW MEXICO

Statewide

 

New Mexico Public Libraries GO Bond

 

PASS

 

69

 

31

NEW YORK

Amenia

 

Amenia Free Library

 

PASS

 

67

 

33

Auburn

Seymour Public Library

PASS

100

0

Elmira

Chemung County Library District

PASS

71

28

Kinderhook

Kinderhook Memorial Library

PASS

53

47

Milton

Sarah Hull Hallock Free Library

PASS

62

38

Pawling

Pawling Free Library

PASS

62

38

Pleasant Valley

Pleasant Valley Free Library

PASS

68

32

Poughkeepsie

Poughkeepsie Public Library District

PASS

69

31

Red Hook

Red Hook Public Library

PASS

74

26

Rhinebeck

Starr Library

PASS

77

23

Rhinecliff

Morton Memorial Library

PASS

67

33

Saugerties

Saugerties Public Library

PASS

92

8

Valatie

Valatie Free Library

PASS

64

36

West Shokan

Olive Free Library

PASS

79

21

Woodstock

Woodstock Public Library District

PASS

75

25

OHIO

Ashland

 

Ashland Public Library

 

PASS

 

73

 

27

Ashtabula

Harbor-Topky Memorial Library

PASS

75

25

Cadiz

Puskarich Public Library System

PASS

73

27

Canton

Stark County District Library

FAIL

48

52

Celina

Mercer County Library District

PASS

75

25

Cincinnati

Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

PASS

63

37

Coldwater

Coldwater Public Library

PASS

80

20

Conneaut

Conneaut Public Library

PASS

67

33

Delaware

Delaware County District Library

PASS

64

36

Georgetown

Dunkirk Hardin Northern Public Library

PASS

67

33

Georgetown

Brown County Public Library

PASS

53

47

Kingsville

Kingsville Public Library

PASS

74

26

Lancaster

Fairfield County District Library

PASS

59

41

Marysville

Marysville Public Library

PASS

68

32

New Carlisle

New Carlisle Public Library

PASS

63

37

New London

New London Public Library

PASS

54

46

Oak Harbor

Oak Harbor Library

PASS

70

30

Painesville

Morley Library

PASS

52

48

Paulding

Paulding County Carnegie Library

PASS

58

42

Pickerington

Pickerington Public Library

PASS

58

42

Port Clinton

Ida Rupp Public Library

PASS

73

27

Tipp City

Tipp City Public Library

PASS

70

30

Upper Sanduski

Upper Sanduski Community Library

PASS

70

30

Wayne

Wayne Public Library

PASS

63

37

Willoughby

Willoughby-Eastlake Public Library

PASS

55

45

Zanesville

Muskingum County Library System

PASS

52

48

OREGON

Tigard

 

Tigard Public Library

 

FAIL

 

45

 

55

PENNSYLVANIA

Oley

 

Oley Valley Community Library

 

PASS

 

68

 

32

WASHINGTON

Tacoma

 

Pierce County Library System

 

PASS

 

50

 

50

WEST VIRGINIA

Charleston

 

Kanawha County Public Library

 

PASS

 

68

 

32

Follansbee

Brooke County Library

PASS

75

25

Hamlin

Hamlin–Lincoln County Public Library

PASS

63

37

Parkersburg

Parkersburg & Wood County Public Library

PASS

72

28

St. Marys

Pleasants County Public Library

PASS

62

38

WYOMING

Hanna

 

Carbon County Public Library

 

PASS

 

71

 

29

Laramie

Laramie County Library

PASS

64

36

SOURCE: LJ PUBLIC LIBRARY REFERENDA 2018

Notable campaigns included the Kansas City Public ­Library, MO, which passed with 84%, perhaps the largest margin of victory for any major American city library in recent memory. Crosby Kemper and his team fielded a very engaged Informational Communications Campaign that had branch-level messaging brought out into the community by branch staff. They met with hundreds of local organizations, agencies, and stakeholder groups. Voters also approved new independent taxing districts in Potomac, IL, and Gooding, ID. For Potomac, it was a must-pass situation: the town’s overall budget had been cut and the library would have closed without passing a district measure. For Gooding, the library leadership had been exploring a district option for several years, and this new governance structure stabilizes the budget and expands the service area. Ferguson, MO, passed a new dedicated tax for the library. It was the first citywide funding measure since the 2014 riots and will ­solidify programs, services, and staffing at a level that had been supplemented by donations in the past.

The Spokane Public Library (SPL) and City of Spokane school district each passed their respective parts of an innovative, intertwined bond package that will see SPL and the school district build two new joint-use libraries and allow the library also to reinvest in branches across the city. The joint approach appealed to voters, and 63% said yes to the projects. In Woodstock, NY, a small group of disaffected citizens petitioned to put a question on the ballot to dissolve the library district. Voters there stunningly defeated the proposal. In Douglas, MA, the Simon Fairfield Library was saved from closure when voters narrowly approved a new funding formula for their town in May. In Ohio, voters in both New Carlisle and New London approved measures that provide local levy funding to supplement basic state aid. Unfortunately, in Vineland, NJ, voters rejected a supplemental operating levy that was needed after the city retroactively cut its voluntary budget contribution in March; that 37% cut is now permanent.

Several libraries went to the ballot in 2018 to override their tax caps or rollbacks and restore their budgets to precap voter-approved levels. In Colorado, Garfield County Libraries passed its override. The Pine River Library District failed to do so by nine votes (after a recount). In Michigan, the North Branch Township Library, Fruitport District Library, and St. Charles District Library passed local overrides.

 

COMPLEX GOVERNING QUESTIONS

In 2018, voters in seven jurisdictions grappled with complicated questions about how to organize library services. It is sometimes difficult to categorize a “pass” or a “fail” vote as a win or a loss for libraries. That said, sometimes voting “no” preserves library funding, and a “fail” in the results column is a cause to celebrate. When the ballot measure about the Woodstock library was defeated 64% to 36%, everyone cheered. In Oak Park, IL, voters approved by 61% to 39% an advisory measure that included the library. On its face, that vote hits the “pass” column. But the question suggested that all independent districts, including the library, should be eliminated or consolidated. Likewise, in Sequim, WA, voters approved the creation of a special taxing district within the North Olympic Library System but did not approve the levy to construct the new building.

 

LIBRARY GOVERNANCE REFERENDA 2018

 

LOCATION

LIBRARY  RESULT  % YES

% NO

Dacono

High Plains Library District

FAIL

44

56

IDAHO

Gooding

 

Gooding Public Library District

 

PASS

 

74

 

26

ILLINOIS

Oak Park

 

Oak Park Public Library

 

PASS

 

61

 

39

Potomac

Potomac Public Library

PASS

67

33

MICHIGAN

Richmond

 

Lois Wagner Public Library

 

PASS

 

51

 

49

NEW YORK

Woodstock

 

Woodstock Public Library

 

FAIL*

 

36

 

64

WASHINGTON

Sequim

 

North Olympic Library System

 

PASS

 

65

 

35

BUILDING PROJECTS ARE ALWAYS LESS SURE

Unlike operating renewals, building bonds have historically passed at lower levels, and this was no different in 2018. Of the 41 building-specific questions we tracked, 25 passed (61%) and 16 failed (39%) (72% passed in 2017). There are no clear trends indicating whether the success of these measures was affected by a project being a new building or an upgrade or remodel to an existing facility, or a stand-alone effort vs. a component of another infrastructure question. The price tag also did not seem to be a determining factor.

 

BUILDING REFERENDA 2018

 

LOCATION

LIBRARY  RESULT  % YES

% NO

CALIFORNIA

Campbell

Campbell Library

PASS

70

30

COLORADO

Windsor

 

Clearview Library District

 

FAIL

 

36

 

64

CONNECTICUT

Brookfield

 

The Brookfield Library

 

FAIL

 

34

 

66

Coventry

Booth & Dimock Memorial Library

FAIL

34

66

Glastonbury

Welles-Turner Memorial Library

PASS

55

45

New Milford

New Milford Public Library

PASS

70

30

FLORIDA

Hudson

 

Pasco County Libraries

 

PASS

 

67

 

33

IDAHO

Wilder

 

Wilder Public Library District

 

FAIL*

 

55

 

45

ILLINOIS

Batavia

 

Batavia Public Library

 

PASS

 

50

 

50

Rochester

Rochester Public Library

FAIL

48

52

South Beloit

South Beloit Public Library

FAIL

47

53

Western Springs

Thomas Ford Memorial Library

PASS

61

39

IOWA

DeWitt

 

Frances Banta Waggoner Community Library

 

PASS

 

82

 

18

MAINE

Falmouth

 

Falmouth Memorial Library

 

PASS

 

58

 

42

Rockport

Rockport Public Library (bridge funding)

PASS

53

47

Rockport

Rockport Public Library (bond)

PASS

54

46

MARYLAND

Largo

 

Prince George’s County Memorial Library System

 

PASS

 

85

 

15

MICHIGAN

Douglas

 

Saugatuck-Douglas District Library

 

PASS

 

64

 

36

Dowagiac

Dowagiac District Library (Aug. 2018)

FAIL

48

52

Dowagiac

Dowagiac District Library

(Nov. 2018)

PASS

53

47

Hemlock

Rauchholz Memorial Library (Aug. 2018)

FAIL

41

59

Hemlock

Rauchholz Memorial Library (Nov. 2018)

FAIL

37

63

Ionia

Ionia Community Library

FAIL

43

57

Lapeer

Lapeer District Library

FAIL

45

55

Plainwell

Charles A. Ransom District Library

PASS

69

31

St. Charles

St. Charles District Library

PASS

56

44

White Cloud

White Cloud Community Library

FAIL

44

56

MINNESOTA

Cambridge

 

East Central Regional Library

 

PASS

 

62

 

38

NEVADA

Boulder City

 

Boulder City Library

 

FAIL

 

32

 

68

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Epping

 

Harvey-Mitchell Memorial Library

 

PASS

 

62

 

38

Exeter

Exeter Public Library

FAIL

50

50

Greenland

Weeks Public Library

PASS

63

37

Wolfeboro

Wolfeboro Public Library

PASS

79

21

NEW YORK

Shirley

 

Mastic-Moriches-Shirley Library

 

FAIL

 

40

 

60

RHODE ISLAND

Jamestown

 

Jamestown Philomenian Library

 

PASS

 

71

 

29

TEXAS

Austin

 

Austin Public Library

 

PASS

 

74

 

26

Corpus Christi

Corpus Christi Public Library

PASS

61

39

UTAH

Orem

 

Orem Library

 

PASS

 

61

 

39

WASHINGTON

Sequim

 

North Olympic Library System

 

FAIL*

 

58

 

42

Spokane

Spokane Public Library

PASS

63

37

WISCONSIN

Ellsworth

 

Ellsworth Public Library

 

PASS

 

51

 

49

SOURCELJ PUBLIC LIBRARY REFERENDA 2018 
* Supermajority required for passage

 

EveryLibrary (of which one of the authors is executive director and the other, a 2018 political action intern) is working with many more libraries to prepare for elections in 2019 and 2020. Many of these are going to the voters because they anticipate significant capital expenditures for aging buildings. Not only do 100-year-old Carnegies need repair and updates, but the library building boom of the 1990s is about to catch up to many communities. Those relatively recent facilities retain wonderful “curb appeal.” Their original bonds are being paid off, too. Despite proper maintenance, however, leadership teams know that over the next five to 15 years, everything from the HVAC systems and roof membranes to parking lots, window caulking, wiring, plumbing, and sump pumps may need to be replaced, resurfaced, upgraded, or remediated. The money for that work will come from either new taxes or cuts to programs, services, collections, or staff. Donor money may be in the mix for some, but we don’t know many “replace the radiant heat pump system” fundraising campaigns that truly inspire.

In our experience, building initiatives are difficult to pass for several reasons. “Why do we still need physical libraries?” is still an open question for many voters. Each facility EveryLibrary works with has to start from scratch to make an independent and local-level case for a significant taxpayer reinvestment in brick and mortar. We don’t see the advocacy ecosystem doing enough to sway public opinion toward reinvesting in libraries. Likewise, and despite the relative ease of renewing an operating levy, renewing long-term public debt requires much more voter engagement. Libraries that are facing a fiscal cliff because of aging facilities need to work on engineering plans and create a community engagement team to talk with voters. That team should especially target voters who may not be library users but support the institution’s mission.

 

MORE THAN PROPERTY OR PARCEL TAXES

In an interesting development, two multipurpose local sales taxes that include libraries were enacted in Hanna and Laramie, WY. Not every state has an option to use such taxes (not a property or parcel tax) to fund libraries. However, in previous years we have seen both county and city sales taxes pass in California and other Western states, as well as special purpose taxes for libraries in Philadelphia and Boulder, CO (in those cases on sugar-sweetened beverages). While some jurisdictions require voter approval to enact new sales or use taxes, other libraries could work with their town, city, or county partners to explore new, nonproperty revenue options. Likewise, library leaders should anticipate and work toward ensuring that libraries are beneficiaries of legal recreational marijuana sales taxes.

 

GO BOND FOR LIBRARIES PASSES HANDILY

The only statewide ballot measure dedicated to library funding this year was the New Mexico “GO Bond for Libraries.” Voters sweepingly approved a $12.7 million General Obligation (GO) Bond 69% to 31%. This bond is unique because it is targeted solely to libraries (school, public, and tribal) and is put out for voter approval on a regular schedule. This is the sixth biennial renewal of this critical state funding. This ringing endorsement offers the New Mexico Library Association momentum for other legislative and funding priorities.

States and local governments have a variety of rules about issuing public debt. Nonetheless, every state has funding options that could, with the right policy and advocacy, be used for libraries. For example, in 2017, New Jersey voters approved a landmark $125 million construction bond providing state matching funds for local library projects. State library association leaders should review the law and consider voter-approved measures as a possible path to new revenue.

 

STATE EDUCATIONAL FUNDING COALITIONS

Across the country, 11 of 15 states (73%) with statewide educational funding ballot measures passed new revenue that could impact funding for school library programs or school librarian positions. In Utah and Colorado, state library associations embraced a new approach to supporting statewide school library funding measures by joining their respective education funding coalitions and campaigning for passage.

In Utah, the Utah Library Association (ULA) and the Utah Educational Library Media Association (UELMA) signed on to endorse Question #1, a statewide fuel tax that would have dramatically improved funding for schools as well as statewide transportation infrastructure. School librarians were specifically mentioned in the ballot language and school library program funding overall stood to benefit. The coalition was a multifaceted group of state and national educational organizations, and ULA/UELMA had a natural place at the table. Each member of the coalition focused on different constituents and voter blocks. EveryLibrary partnered with ULA to create and field a digital voter engagement campaign focused on the potential positive impacts to school libraries and to encourage pro-library voters to “Take the Pledge” to vote for the measure. Unfortunately, Question #1 failed. However, future ULA/UELMA advocacy efforts should benefit from the new relationships made with other educational stakeholders. EveryLibrary helped them identify voters across the state, which will be an asset moving forward.

Meanwhile, the Colorado Association of Libraries (CAL) and Colorado Association of School Librarians (CASL) were early supporters of Amendment 73, a statewide question to change the income tax formula in the State Constitution to fund education better. As in Utah, CAL and CASL knew that better education funding overall could mean better funding for school library programs. Unlike in Utah, however, there were no direct prescriptions about where in a school the funding should go. CAL/CASL recognized that in order to influence how revenue would be spent, they needed to be part of trying to pass it. As part of the “Great Schools Thriving Communities” coalition, their leadership teams supported both the petition process to get the amendment on the ballot and then statewide voter education and outreach during the campaign. EveryLibrary partnered with CAL to create a digital voter engagement “Take the Pledge” campaign that reached tens of thousands of potential voters. The amendment failed, but the new approach to coalition work puts CAL/CASL in a good place for future alliances.

The statewide education coalitions in Colorado and Utah are composed of 501(c)(3) and 501(c)(4) organizations working side by side on a common goal. These (c)(3) and(c)(4) coalitions bring nonprofits, political action committees (PACs), and even unions to the same “issue and advocacy table.” This approach is very common outside of libraries. We see these kinds of coalitions successfully advance issues such as medical or recreational marijuana legalization, minimum wage, education funding, and Medicare expansion. It is both legal and normal for nonprofit organizations and PACs to work together in this way. EveryLibrary, as a 501(c)(4) PAC, was proud to support both the Utah and Colorado initiatives. We believe that more state library associations should join relevant state (c)(3)/(c)(4) education coalitions to advance common issues and improve funding for school libraries.

 

LOOKING AHEAD

 

2018 SUMMARY

  OPERATING REFERENDA

BUILDING REFERENDA

 

NUMBER OF MEASURES

% PASSING

% FOR

% AGAINST

NUMBER OF MEASURES

% PASSING

% FOR

% AGAINST

TOTAL REFERENDA

109

88

65

35

41

61

56

44

DATE

January–April 

4

 

50

 

52

 

48

 

8

 

50

 

55

 

45

May–August

34

88

65

35

7

43

58

42

September–December

71

90

66

34

26

69

56

44

AMOUNT*

Under $10 million 

n/a

 

n/a

 

n/a

 

n/a

 

25

 

68

 

51

 

43

Over $10 million

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

11

55

56

44

#E7DFEA

Northeast 

19

 

95

 

69

 

31

 

13

 

69

 

56

 

44

Midwest

72

90

64

36

17

53

53

47

South

7

86

64

36

4

100

72

28

West

11

64

61

39

7

43

54

46

SOURCELJ PUBLIC LIBRARY REFERENDA 2018
Number of measures do not add up to the total as information was unavailable

 

In 2018, the electorate proved open to renewing library funding. New revenue—whether for operations or capital projects—was less assured. Expected outcomes for libraries on the ballot in 2019 and 2020 are varied. Library leaders still need to reckon with the critical things we learned in the 2018 update of the “From Awareness to Funding” report: willingness to pay for the library is shrinking and so is perception of the librarian as a competent, involved, and necessary professional. [For EveryLibrary’s take on how to address these crucial challenges to continued success at the polls, see Chrastka’s “Reversing the Slide in Voter Support.”]

The “From Awareness to Funding” data shows us that political affiliation is not a determinant of how someone votes. Still, we know from EveryLibrary experience that certain types of opposition to libraries originate with antitax or antigovernment groups. If 2019 or 2020 is anything like 2015 and 2016, there could be a renewed emphasis on issues like local taxes by national and state organizations.

Library leaders must anticipate ways to inoculate themselves against antitax advocates by early, vocal, and frequent communitywide engagement. A proactive, broad-based, pro-library coalition is the best approach.


John Chrastka is Executive Director of EveryLibrary and a 2014 LJ Mover & Shaker. Samantha Mairson was EveryLibrary’s 2018 Political Action Intern and a 2018 MLIS graduate from Syracuse University, NY.

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