How Sally Rooney Adapted "Normal People" for Hulu | Book Pulse

Sally Rooney and George M. Johnson win the buzz today. The Library of Congress starts Citizen DJ, a way to make music using its collection. Men stop reading books they do not like long before women do. R.L. Stine’s Goosebumps is headed to TV as a live-action series. Libraries during the pandemic make news.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Sally Rooney and George M. Johnson Win the Buzz

Two literary stories get strong signal boosts today. First, the L.A. Times reports on how Sally Rooney helped adapt her novel for the screen. Reviews of the show land everwhere as Jezebel considers the adaptation. So does Vox. The Washington Post as well. And the NYT.

Then in a dasiy chain of attention, HuffPost interviews George M. Johnson, All Boys Aren't Blue: A Memoir-Manifesto (FSG: Macmillan). Bitch Media has a feature and also an interview by Johnson of the poet Danez Smith. LitHub in turn has more on Smith.

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Little Family by Ishmael Beah (Riverhead: Penguin): “an empathy-expanding story without the heavy gears of polemical fiction. In a sense, Beah has written an African social novel that complements earlier novels by Dickens and Twain, but he conveys his unsettling assessment with a more delicate balance of tenderness and dread.”

The NYT reviews Philosopher of the Heart: The Restless Life of Søren Kierkegaard by Clare Carlisle (FSG: Macmillan): “a reading experience that feels a bit like the Mad Hatter’s tea party in “Alice in Wonderland,” information flying at us untethered, the courses all out of order.” Also, Ways To Make Sunshine by Renée Watson (text) & illus. by Nina Mata (Bloomsbury Children’s Books: Macmillan): “perfectly in step with its time.”  The paper also has an audiobook review, of You Never Forget Your First A Biography of George Washington by Alexis Coe, read by Brittany Pressley and Alexis Coe (Penguin Audio): “Pressley’s stentorian affect detracts from the authenticity of the dialogue between Washington and his contemporaries, undermining Coe’s argument that the founders were people too, just like us.”

The L.A. Times reviews The Compton Cowboys: The New Generation of Cowboys in America's Urban Heartland by Walter Thompson-Hernandez (William Morrow: Harper): “reveals a three-dimensionality of people and place.”

Briefly Noted

The Washington Post picks 10 books for May.

Bustle select “7 Poems To Read In Honor Of National Poetry Month.”

The Wolfson History Prize shortlist is released.

The Arthur Ellis Awards shortlist is announced.

Emma Donoghue’s next book will be The Pull of the Stars (Little, Brown: Hachette), due on July 21. CBC has some details.

CrimeReads hosts “The State of Crime Writing in 2020: Part 2.”

LitHub has an exploration and reading suggestions centered on memoirs-in-essays.

LitHub picks the best book covers of April.

The L.A. Times interviews Lawrence Wright, The End of October (Knopf). So does NPR’s All Things Considered. Deadline has news that things are simmering along for an adaptation.

Entertainment Weekly interviews Si Spurrier and Bilquis Evely, as their comic The Dreaming #20 ends the “first era of NeilGaiman’s Sandman Universe.”

Electric Lit interviews Ho Sok Fong, Lake Like a Mirror (Two Lines Press).

Salon interviews Jen Gotch, The Upside of Being Down: How Mental Health Struggles Led to My Greatest Successes in Work and Life (Gallery: S. & S.).

Tor.com has “What S.L. Huang Is Reading This Season.” Also, an excerpt of I Come with Knives: Malus Domestica #2 by S. A. Hunt (Tor.com: Macmillan).

The Library of Congress starts Citizen DJ, a way to make music using its collection. More here. It is still in demo but is workable now.

CNN reports on the rise in reading after an Alaskan town voted to censor books like The Great Gatsby.

Men stop reading books they do not like long before women do. LitHub has a story.

There is Taco Bell Quarterly. Vox talks with the editor.

The NYT has an obituary for Eavan Boland.

COVID-19 Reading and RA/Collection Development Resources

Bustle offers “Books About Post-World War I Offer A Model For Life After Coronavirus.”

Tor.com suggests “What to Read When the Whole World’s Falling Apart, Part 6.”

The Seattle Times helps readers “Escape into American history with these 6 books, which offer lessons of leadership for trying times.”

A group of Portuguese authors are writing a serial novel, a chapter a day. An English translation is in the works. The Guardian reports.

PBS NewsHour has a piece about libraries during, and after, the pandemic.

The NYT suggests making comics, and shares resources and tips to help.

Authors on Air

R.L. Stine’s Goosebumps is headed to TV as a live-action series. Emma Jane Unsworth’s Adults in also headed to TV. Deadline has both stories.

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Alia Volz, Home Baked: My Mom, Marijuana, and the Stoning of San Francisco (HMH).

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. gets a trailer. Season seven begins on May 27.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Be the first reader to comment.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?