'Ready Player Two' by Ernest Cline Is a Bestseller | Book Pulse

Ready Player Two by Ernest Cline is No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the NYT Audio Fiction list, and starts at No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list. Forthcoming book news is out about A Slow Fire Burning by Paula Hawkins and Life After Death by Sister Souljah. Adaptations are in the works for Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir by Natasha Trethewey and The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat by Edward Kelsey Moore.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

Ready Player Two by Ernest Cline (Ballantine: Random House) boots up at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Deadly Cross by James Patterson (Little, Brown: Hachette) is No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Awakening: The Dragon Heart Legacy, Book 1 by Nora Roberts (St. Martin's: Macmillan) opens at No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Modern Warriors: Real Stories from Real Heroes by Pete Hegseth (Broadside: HarperCollins) debuts at No. 6, with the bulk buy indicator, on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Saving Freedom: Truman, the Cold War, and the Fight for Western Civilization by Joe Scarborough (Harper) starts at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list

Audio

The NYT Audio Fiction top bestseller for December is Ready Player Two by Ernest Cline (Random House Audio). The No. 1 Audio Nonfiction for December is A Promised Land by Barack Obama (Random House Audio).

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review): No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 7 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 10 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 12 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man by Emmanuel Acho (Flatiron, An Oprah Book: Macmillan): No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 14 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The Washington Post review Big Girl, Small Town by Michelle Gallen (Algonquin: Workman; LJ starred review): "...an immensely lovable debut novel." Also, Love, Kurt: The Vonnegut Love Letters, 1941-1945 edited by Edith Vonnegut (Random House): "It may be an exercise in delusion, but it’s still heartening to bask in these letters, to take this feral love for what it was at a freeze-frame moment in time."

NPR reviews Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley (Knopf: Random House): "...this delightful, heartwarming tale about creatures living in the rough in Paris's Champs de Mars is something new for Smiley, and it's an appealing balm for harsh times." Also, Wild Minds: The Artists and Rivalries That Inspired the Golden Age of Animation by Reid Mitenbuler (Atlantic Monthly): "Mitenbuler's book is a gem for anyone wanting to understand animation's origin story."

The NYT reviews Moonflower Murders by Anthony Horowitz (Harper): "It’s a richly plotted, head-spinning novel about a present-day disappearance, a murder eight years earlier and a fictional murder that may be relevant to both."

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Authors Morgan Jerkins, Chanel Miller, and Molly Knox Ostertag are among the 2021 Forbes "30 Under 30."

The Chicago Tribune picks the best fiction and nonfiction of the year.

The CBC selects "The best Canadian nonfiction of 2020."

Kirkus features "Books That Deserved More Buzz in 2020."

The Washington Post has a list of "this season’s hidden gems."

Shelf Awareness lists books out next week.

The Millions picks the best books out in December.

Shondaland has 5 books to read this month.

AARP suggests "6 Novels to Read If You Love Hallmark Holiday Movies."

Barbara Hoffert has new Prepub Alert columns in LJ. Also in LJ, a new link to a downloadable spreadsheet of the Best Books of 2020.

Emmanuel Acho shares his favorite books of the year with Amazon.

Severance by Ling Ma is the PBS NewsHour-NYT book club pick for December.

The Vox Book Club picks for December and January are Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir and its sequel, Harrow the Ninth (both Tordotcom: Macmillan; LJ starred reviews).

Paula Hawkins announced her forthcoming book, A Slow Fire Burning (Riverhead: Penguin), on GMA. It's due out August 2021.

After 20 years, Sister Souljah has a follow-up to The Coldest Winter Ever. Life After Death (Atria: S. & S.) is due out March 2021. The Shade Room has details.

People reports pro wrestler Jon Cena will compile his inspirational thoughts from Twitter into two new books.

Lit Hub excerpts How To Be A Good Girl by Jamie Hood (Grieveland), which is out next week.

Tor.com has an excerpt from Wendy, Darling by A.C. Wise (Titan: Random House). It's due out June 2021.

Polygon excerpts The Book of Accidents by Chuck Wendig (Del Rey: Random House), which is due out July 2021.

The NYT's "Inside the List" column features Chloe Gong, These Violent Delights (Margaret K. McElderry: S. & S.), who is one of the youngest best-selling authors of 2020.

The Washington Post interviews Ijeoma Oluo, Mediocre: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America (Seal: Hachette: LJ starred review).

Ryan Gattis, The System (MCD: Macmillan), speaks with the L.A. Times about the criminal justice system, and writes about places to eat that appear in the book.

BuzzFeed has a Q&A with the author of its Book Club pick, David Heska Wanbli Weiden, Winter Counts (Ecco: HarperCollins). Also, a talk with Aiden Thomas, Cemetery Boys (Swoon Reads: Macmillan), whose next book, Lost in the Never Woods (Swoon Reads: Macmillan), is due out in March.

Amazon speaks with Tina Turner, Happiness Becomes You: A Guide to Changing Your Life for Good (Atria: S. & S.).

Jessica J. Lee discusses the obstacles she faced in writing Two Trees Make a Forest: In Search of My Family’s Past Among Taiwan’s Mountains and Coasts (Catapult: Ingram) with Electric Lit.

Ta-Nehisi Coates does a Q&A with O: The Oprah Magazine.

Entertainment Weekly interviews Jenny Slate, Little Weirds (Little, Brown: Hachette).

Bitch Media looks at books about addiction written by women.

With long waits for holds on recent award-winning books, NYPL offers recommendations for similar titles.

An art installation by Alexandre Arrechea that's inspired by The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway is currently installed on a Miami beach. Town & Country reports.

The celebrity-backed Project Northmoor hopes to raise funds to turn J.R.R. Tolkien's home into a museum. The NYT has details.

The L.A. Times has reactions from publishers and booksellers on the end of BookExpo

Authors on Air

A series adaptation of Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir by Natasha Trethewey (Ecco: Harper; LJ starred review) is in the works. Deadline reports

The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat by Edward Kelsey Moore (Knopf: Random House) is getting a feature-film adaptation. Variety has details.

The Dig, based on the book by John Preston, has a trailer. It's out on Netflix Jan. 15.

The Maris Review podcast interviews Sarah Shun-lien Bynum, Likes (FSG: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

Charles A. Kupchan discusses Isolationism: A History of America's Efforts to Shield Itself from the World (Oxford) with the Keen On podcast.

On NPR's Morning Edition, Katherine May, Wintering: The Power of Rest and Retreat in Difficult Times by (Riverhead: Penguin), discusses why accepting winter helps us enjoy it. Also, Cheryl Strayed talks about bringing back her "Dear Sugar" advice column.

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