PEN America Announces 2021 Literary Awards Longlists | Book Pulse

The longlists for the 2021 PEN America Literary Awards are out. Finalists will be announced in Feb. A film adaptation of On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong is in the works. Adaptations being released this week include The Midnight Sky, News of the World, Wonder Woman 1984, and Bridgerton. Plus, The New Republic looks into ebook licensing at school libraries.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Page to Screen

Dec. 23:

The Midnight Sky, based on Good Morning, Midnight by Lily Brooks-Dalton. Netflix. Reviews | Trailer

Dec. 25: 

News of the World, based on the book by Paulette Jiles. Theatrical Release. Reviews | Trailer

Wonder Woman 1984, which has associated titles. Theatrical Release and HBO Max. Reviews | Trailer

Pinocchio, based on the book by Carlo Collodi. Theatrical Release. Reviews | Trailer

Bridgerton, based on the series by Julia Quinn. Netflix. Reviews | Trailer

Reviews

The Washington Post reviews Older by Pamela Redmond (Gallery: S. & S.): "explores what happens when a woman rejects societal expectations, embraces her experiences and trusts her gut. If, while doing so, she happens to have a happily-ever-after moment? Why not?" Also, Letters from Father Christmas, Centenary Edition by J.R.R. Tolkien (HMH): "Readers unfamiliar with the book will be captivated by a new, centenary edition, with Father Christmas’s handwritten letters and pictures beautifully reproduced, and his ornate — if sometimes difficult to decipher — penmanship helpfully transcribed to aid in them reading aloud (which I would recommend)." The Bright Book of Life: Novels to Read and Reread by Harold Bloom (Knopf: Random House): "reads more like an internal dialogue than an effort to enlighten or persuade others."

The NYT reviews Feline Philosophy: Cats and the Meaning of Life by John Gray (FSG: Macmillan): "Gray has written so brilliantly about the perils of anthropomorphism in his other books that it’s surprising to see the rank anthropomorphism he deploys in this one — only instead of projecting human qualities onto cats, he projects the qualities he wants humans to have."

Briefly Noted

The longlists for the 2021 PEN America Literary Awards are out. Finalists will be announced in Feb.

CrimeReads rounds up "The Best Traditional Mysteries of 2020."

Datebook selects "8 books that captured the mood of 2020."

The NYT offers "Audiobooks to Get You Through the Most Distracted of Times."

Book Riot chooses the best queer comics and manga of the year, and also lists "14 of the Best Books About Unions, Organizing, and American Labor."

The Takeout lists the best cookbooks of the year.

A look at several travel and food memoirs in LJ.

Shelf Awareness previews new books out the first full week of the new year.

At Lit Hub, translators and indie booksellers preview books in translation coming out in 2021.

See which books Tina Turner enjoyed this year at Amazon.

Cleo Wade talks about her poetry and some of her favorite books of the year with PopSugar.

A look at the work of Walter Tevis, the author whose book is behind the popular new series The Queen's Gambit, is in the NYT.

The Guardian interviews Will Dean, whose The Last Thing to Burn (Atria/Emily Bestler: S. & S.) is due out in the U.S. April 20.

The NYT excerpts Michael Cunningham's introduction to a new edition of Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf that's due out from Vintage Jan. 5.

Emma Glass discusses Rest and Be Thankful (Bloomsbury Circus Macmillan) with Kirkus.

There may be "stories within stories in this cemetery" beyond the ones included in If These Stones Could Talk by Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills, as a story in the NYT details.

The New Yorker considers what poetry offers us in times of crisis.

Vulture explores the question: "Who Did J.K. Rowling Become?"

Electric Lit has a Q&A with Bernardine Evaristo, Girl, Woman, Other (Grove Press, Black Cat).

Vox recaps a turbulent year of publishing protests.

"By locking school districts into contracts that turn them into captive consumers, corporate tech providers are draining public education budgets that don’t have a penny to spare." The New Republic looks into ebook licensing at school libraries. 

February 18 has been named Toni Morrison Day in Ohio. The late author was a native of Lorain, OH, and that is her birthday.

Author and scholar Ezra F. Vogel has died. The NYT has an obituary. Plus, year-end tributes include ones to critic Stanley Crouch, poet Diane di Prima, and Kiese Makeba Laymon's memorial to John Thompson.

Authors on Air

A24 is working on a film adaptation of On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong (Penguin Press; LJ starred review). Vulture reports.

A third and final season of His Dark Materials, based on the series by Philip Pullman, will begin production next year. Deadline has details.

Alvin Irby, author and founder of Barbershop Books, talks with Lifehacker's The Upgrade podcast about ways to get kids more excited about reading.

Want to get the latest book news delivered to your inbox each day? Sign up for our daily Book Pulse newsletter.

Comment Policy:
  • Be respectful, and do not attack the author, people mentioned in the article, or other commenters. Take on the idea, not the messenger.
  • Don't use obscene, profane, or vulgar language.
  • Stay on point. Comments that stray from the topic at hand may be deleted.
  • Comments may be republished in print, online, or other forms of media.
  • If you see something objectionable, please let us know. Once a comment has been flagged, a staff member will investigate.


RELATED 

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?

We are currently offering this content for free. Sign up now to activate your personal profile, where you can save articles for future viewing

ALREADY A SUBSCRIBER?