What It's Like To Promote Books During Cultural Upheaval | Book Pulse

Near Dark by Brad Thor leads six new titles onto the bestseller lists. Booklists for August and best audio for July arrive. Rocket Says Look Up! by Nathan Bryon, illustrated by Dapo Adeola wins the Waterstones children’s book prize. Authors including Emily M. Danforth, Tiffany McDaniel, and Sara Seager discuss “bringing their books into the world during cultural upheaval.” The NYT considers how “Noname and other Black thought leaders have taken what Oprah built and made something new.” Michelle Obama’s podcast began yesterday.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Near Dark by Brad Thor (Atria/Emily Bestler: S. & S.) debuts at No. 2 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Axiom's End by Lindsay Ellis (St. Martin’s Press: Macmillan) holds No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Pull of the Stars by Emma Donoghue (Little, Brown: Hachette) closes the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list at No. 14.

Nonfiction

The Answer Is . . . : Reflections on My Life by Alex Trebek (S. & S.) this book for No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

How to Destroy America in Three Easy Steps by Ben Shapiro (Broadside Books: Harper) opens at No. 3 on both the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list (with the bulk buying indicator) and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list

Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism by Anne Applebaum (Doubleday: Random House; LJ starred review) closes the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list at No. 11.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 7 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (The New Press): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 10 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race by Beverly Daniel Tatum (Basic Books: Hachette): No. 12 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 13 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 14 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor by Layla F. Saad (Sourcebooks; LJ starred review): No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

NPR reviews Intimations: Six Essays by Zadie Smith (Penguin): “The success … is in its clarity and honesty. Smith has taken a mirror and reflected us back to ourselves during the earliest moments of this crisis. It is up to us to change if we don't like what we see.”

The Washington Post reviews Austen Years: A Memoir in Five Novels by Rachel Cohen (FSG: Macmillan): “Cohen writes with emotion and insight.” Also, Other People's Pets by R.L. Maizes (Celadon Books: Macmillan): “with its lively voice and unexpected characters, makes a perfect addition to anyone’s summer reading pile, but it is required for those who understand that coming of age has absolutely nothing to do with age.”

The NYT reviews Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir by Natasha Trethewey (Ecco: Harper; LJ starred review): “is, among so many other wondrous things, an exploration of a Black mother and daughter trying to get free in a land that conflates survival with freedom and womanhood with girlhood.” Also, a dual review of books that provide “New Looks at the Fate of Foreigners in America, From the Privileged to the Most Vulnerable.” The “Inside the List” column features Big Friendship: How We Keep Each Other Close by Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman, (S. & S.).

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

The NYT suggests “13 Books to Watch For in August.”

Book Marks showcases AudioFile's Best Audiobooks of July.

Electric Lit offers “9 Books Where Women of Color Tell Their Own Stories About Mental Health.”

Barbara Hoffert has new “Prepub Alert” pieces in LJ.

Karin Slaughter's picks summer reading for Amazon.

New Panorama Picks are out

Lit Hub picks “The 12 Best Book Covers of July.”

Rocket Says Look Up! by Nathan Bryon, illustrated by Dapo Adeola (Random House Books for Young Readers; SLJ starred review) wins the Waterstones children’s book prize. The Guardian reports.

Entertainment Weekly asks Emily M. Danforth, Robert Jones, Jr., Charlotte McConaghy, Tiffany McDaniel, Nadia Owusu, and Sara Seager about “bringing their books into the world during cultural upheaval.”

The NYT writes “Noname and other Black thought leaders have taken what Oprah built and made something new.”

The Guardian features Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review).

Entertainment Weekly features The Living Dead by George A. Romero, Daniel Kraus (Tor.com: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

The L. A. Times features Karolina Waclawiak and her new book Life Events (FSG: Macmillan).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts My Life as a Villainess by Laura Lippman (William Morrow: Harper).

The NYT runs the poem Beatific by Tracy K. Smith as selected by Naomi Shihab Nye.

In forthcoming book news, Donald Trump Jr. has posted a pre-order page for Liberal Privilege: Joe Biden and the Democrats’ Defense of the Indefensible. It is self-published and releases on Aug. 25. Also, Matthew McConaughey is writing a memoir, to be titled Greenlights and coming on Oct. 20 from Crown. USA Today reports he says the book “is not a traditional memoir, or an advice book, but rather a playbook based on adventures in my life … Adventures that have been significant, enlightening, and funny, sometimes because they were meant to be but mostly because they didn't try to be."

Meg Cabot "reflects on the neighborhood romance that restored her faith in love in the time of coronavirus.” Bustle has the piece. Cabot's new book is No Offense (William Morrow: Harper).

HuffPost interviews Morgan Jerkins, Wandering in Strange Lands: A Daughter of the Great Migration Reclaims Her Roots (Harper).

Elle interviews Laura van den Berg, I Hold a Wolf by the Ears: Stories (FSG: Macmillan).

Vogue wonders “Has Zadie Smith Written the Definitive Account of the COVID-19 Era?” Her book is Intimations: Six Essays by Zadie Smith (Penguin).

Publishers Weekly has a report on the Internet Archive’s response to the lawsuit against it.

The Guardian has a piece about angry fans (and an editor) waiting for Fantasy novels. It also contains advice from Neil Gaiman about the wait: “Read the original book again. Read something else. Get on with your life. Hope that the author is writing the book you want to read, and not dying, or something equally as dramatic.” And on a related note, the press is noting that George R. R. Martin said last year that Winds of Winter would be done by now. The L. A. Times has details.

Authors on Air

Michelle Obama’s podcast began yesterday. Here is the link.

Matt Haig’s Echo Boy has been optioned for a series planned as “a hybrid of live action and animation.” Jonathan Levine (Warm Bodies) will direct the full run of  Hulu’s adaptation of Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty. Stanley Tucci will star in the TV series La Fortuna, based on Paco Roca and Guillermo Corral’s graphic novel El Tesoro del Cisne Negro (The Treasure Of The Black Swan). Universal Pictures, Issa Rae, and Jordan Peele will make Sinkhole, an adaptation of Leyna Krow’s short story. Comics author Frank Miller is getting sued by a producer over “defamation and economic-interference.” All Creatures Great and Small looks like it will get a second season. Deadline reports.

Vanity Fair features the new Netflix series Ratched, which is based on a character from One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. It premiers on September 18. Also, a first look piece at The Comey Rule, which is based on A Higher Loyalty by James Comey. There is also a teaser trailer out. It airs on Showtime on Sept. 27.

Town & Country also looks at Ratched and has a look at Netflix’s The Queen's Gambit, based on the book by Walter Tevis.

Amazon has a trailer out for Chemical Hearts, based on Our Chemical Hearts by Krystal Sutherland. It debuts on Aug. 21.

Netflix posts the opening scene of The Umbrella Academy, season 2. It is based on the comics of the same name, written by Gerard Way and illustrated by Gabria Bà. It will air on July 31. Vanity Fair has a story on the show, calling it “Fan Service for Fans of Everything.”

PBS NewsHour has a new piece about Claudia Rankine and Citizen: An American Lyric (Graywolf Press: Macmillan).

Fox features Finding My Place: Making My Parents' American Dream Come True by Elizabeth Pipko (Post Hill Press: S. & S.).

Al Roker, You Look So Much Better in Person: True Stories of Absurdity and Success (Hachette Go), will be on The Talk today.

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Sasha M

Great list of books but wouldn't really classify this article as "What It's Like To Promote Books During Cultural Upheaval".

Posted : Jul 30, 2020 10:56


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