Jenna Bush Hager Picks 'Send for Me' and 'The Four Winds' for February Book Club | Book Pulse

Jenna Bush Hager selects two books for her February "Read with Jenna" book club: Send for Me by Lauren Fox and The Four Winds by Kristin Hannah. In other book club news, New York Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard has launched his own club, and Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu is this month's PBS NewsHour/NYT pick. The February Earphones Award winners are up at AudioFile. The New York Public Library has launched the Woodson Project, featuring book lists, events, and more, to honor Black History Month. Plus, the forthcoming novel The Maidens by Alex Michaelides, which is due out June 15, has been optioned for a TV series.

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February Book Buzz

Jenna Bush Hager selects two books for her February "Read with Jenna" book club: Send for Me by Lauren Fox (Knopf: Random House) and The Four Winds by Kristin Hannah (St. Martin's: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

New York Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard talks with People about his new monthly book club. First up for February is What Doesn't Kill Us: How Freezing Water, Extreme Altitude, and Environmental Conditioning Will Renew Our Lost Evolutionary Strength by Scott Carney (Rodale: Random House).

Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu (Pantheon: Random House) is this month's PBS NewsHour/NYT book club title.

Amazon's editor picks for February are up. The "Spotlight Pick" is The Four Winds by Kristin Hannah (St. Martin's: Macmillan; LJ starred review), and the "Featured Debut" is How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House by Cherie Jones (Little, Brown: Hachette).

In this month's issue of Costco Connection, Pennie Clark Ianniciello picks Oona Out of Order by Margarita Montimore (Flatiron: Macmillan; LJ starred review). The buyer's pick is Missing and Endangered by J. A. Jance (William Morrow: HarperCollins). 

The February Earphones Award winners are up at AudioFile.

Barnes & Noble lists "Our Most Anticipated New Book Releases of February 2021."

Entertainment Weekly also picks the best books of the month, plus new romances.

O: The Oprah Magazine selects "20 of the Best Books of February 2021 to Fall in Love With."

PopSugar picks the 24 most promising books out this month, plus the best new mysteries and thrillers, romances, and YA books.

The Washington Post chooses the best of the month.

io9 rounds up the best sci-fi and fantasy books out in February.

Bustle looks at the best books out this first week of the month.

Reviews

The NYT reviews The Ratline: The Exalted Life and Mysterious Death of a Nazi Fugitive by Philippe Sands (Knopf: Random House): "t’s a testament to Sands — his fiercely inquiring mind, his excellent researchers, the wealth of documents and his ability to make them come to life — that the book is so suspenseful." Also, My Year Abroad by Chang-rae Lee (Riverhead: Penguin): "...[Lee] remains in command while this novel runs straight off the road and into a deep ravine." Kamala's Way: An American Life by Dan Morain (S. & S.): "'Kamala’s Way' could appeal to aficionados of California politics who want a better understanding of the high-powered political world where Harris’s national star rose." Lone Stars by Justin Deabler (St. Martin's: Macmillan): "The accumulation of small, ordinary moments gives this novel its eventual power." Girl A by Abigail Dean (Viking: Penguin): "It is a haunting, powerful book, the mystery at its heart not who committed a crime, but how to carry on with life in its aftermath." Send for Me by Lauren Fox (Knopf: Random House): "...a real achievement — beautifully written, deeply felt, tender and thoughtful." Bina: A Novel in Warnings by Anakana Schofield (New York Review Books): "...a bitterly funny novel but one that carries moral weight." The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation by Anna Malaika Tubbs (Flatiron: Macmillan): "Her goal is to reframe the ordering of facts and, in doing so, to assign them new values." How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps Her House by Cherie Jones (Little, Brown: Hachette): "The storytelling is far from breathless, but it will leave you that way." Smalltime: A Story of My Family and the Mob by Russell Shorto (W. W. Norton): "...it’s a family memoir. Whether Shorto likes it or not." Made in China: A Prisoner, an SOS Letter, and the Hidden Cost of America’s Cheap Goods by Amelia Pang (Algonquin: Workman): "Pang leaves us with a question that she herself has trouble answering. How do you square China’s economic might with its human rights record?" Milk Fed by Melissa Broder (Scriber: S. & S.): "...a celebration of bodily liberation, not a more communal and political version, and the ways we keep ourselves chained to others’ ideas of whom and what we ought to look like and long for." Floating in a Most Peculiar Way: A Memoir by Louis Chude-Sokei (HMH): "It reveals how we carry trauma with us, how that trauma can cause us to hurt one another, and how we still love and carry one another with wounds unhealed." Soul City: Race, Equality, and the Lost Dream of an American Utopia by Thomas Healy (Metropolitan: Macmillan; LJ starred review): "...if we want to know what the project meant at the time and what it should mean for us today, Healy’s book provides more of a reason to move on from rather than linger on its pages."City of a Thousand Gates by Rebecca Sacks (Harper): "The novel digs into the enduring wound of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and offers an unflinching, unforgiving look into the harsh realities of the occupation and its impact on people’s lives." Plus, brief reviews of three new short story collections.

The L.A. Times reviews The Ratline: The Exalted Life and Mysterious Death of a Nazi Fugitive by Philippe Sands (Knopf: Random House): "...a riveting, deeply researched case that builds chronologically to show who and what Otto [von Wächter] was."

The Washington Post reviews Bride of the Sea by Eman Quotah (Tin House: W. W. Norton): "...offering Americans a more nuanced view of the Saudi Kingdom through a cast of compelling characters and a sweeping plot that spans continents and decades." Also, Milk Blood Heat by Dantiel W. Moniz (Grove; LJ starred review): "A lot of collections consist of some duds, yet every single page in this book is a shimmering seashell that contains the sound of multiple oceans."

USA Today reviews Mike Nichols: A Life by Mark Harris (Penguin), which earns 3.5 stars: "...as B’way and Hollywood bios go, this is one boffo book."

Vogue also reviews Mike Nichols: A Life by Mark Harris (Penguin): "The burden of 'Mike Nichols: A Life' is that it has to retain its readers attention to such a degree that they can resist the urge to put the book down for a few hours and watch a Nichols film."

NPR reviews Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration by Reuben Jonathan Miller (Little, Brown: Hachette): "This indictment of the criminal justice system should trouble the soul of the nation."

Entertainment Weekly reviews three books with "wonderfully flawed female narrators." Milk Fed by Melissa Broder (Scriber: S. & S.) earns an A-: "...one of the strangest and sexiest novels of the new year." We Run the Tides by Vendela Vida (Ecco: Harper Collins) earns a B+: "...a fast, addictive read." Fake Accounts by Lauren Oyler (Catapult: Penguin) earns a B+: "...delightfully wry, sharply observational prose."

Briefly Noted

Ibram X. Kendi recommends books to read during Black History Month for Amazon.

The New York Public Library has launched the Woodson Project, featuring book lists, events, and more, to honor Black History Month.

Henry Louis Gates Jr., The Black Church: This Is Our Story, This Is Our Song (Penguin), recommends "his favorite recent books about the Black experience in America" for AARP.

The shortlist for the 2021 Wingate Literary Prize, which honors books that "reflect the depths of Jewishness and Jewish life," is out.

Filmmaker Blitz Bazawule is working on his debut novel, The Scent of Burnt Flowers (Ballantine: Random House). It's due out next year. Deadline has details.

Lit Hub has an excerpt from The Body Scout by Lincoln Michel (Orbit: Hachette). It's due out Oct. 19.

Anna Malaika Tubbs discusses why she wrote The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation (Flatiron: Macmillan) with Amazon.

Danielle Evans talks with The Strategist about the books she read while writing The Office of Historical Corrections (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review).

The Guardian interviews Patricia Lockwood, No One Is Talking About This (Riverhead: Penguin).

Entertainment Weekly's "What's in a Page" column features Kate Elizabeth Russell, My Dark Vanessa (Willia Morrow: HarperCollins).

Elizabeth Gonzalez James discusses Mona At Sea (Santa Fe Writer's Project) with The Rumpus.

Critic Lauren Oyler, Fake Accounts (Catapult: Penguin), talks with Elle about trying to write a book that won't get picked apart by critics.

Lit Hub has a Q&A with Gabrielle Korn, Everybody (Else) Is Perfect: How I Survived Hypocrisy, Beauty, Clicks, and Likes (Atria: S. & S.). 

Shondaland speaks with Rosalind Miles about The Women's History of the Modern World: How Radicals, Rebels, and Everywomen Revolutionized the Last 200 Years (William Morrow: HarperCollins). Also, an interview with Katherine May, Wintering: The Power of Rest and Retreat in Difficult Times (Riverhead: Penguin).

People profiles Samantha Power, The Education of an Idealist: A Memoir (Dey Street: HarperCollins; LJ starred review).

Aggie Blum Thompson, Mia Manansala, and other debut novelists discuss what it's like to promote a book during a pandemic with Forbes.

A robot has some suggestions for books that would make good gifts for women, but those suggestions (and even some titles) are a bit off. Lit Hub takes a look.

Authors on Air

Stone Village Television picked up the rights to adapt the forthcoming novel The Maidens by Alex Michaelides (Celedon: Macmillan; due out June 15) as a series. Also, the cast is set for the Netflix series The Midnight Club, based on the book by Christopher Pike. Deadline reports.

Rumaan Alam interviews translator and writer Damion Searls for Slate's Working podcast.

Elizabeth Gilbert shares her experience of living alone during the pandemic with The Quarantine Tapes podcast.

Kenneth R. Rosen discusses Troubled: The Failed Promise of America’s Behavioral Treatment Programs (Little A: Amazon) with the Keen On podcast.

Ibram X. Kendi, Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019 (One World: Random House; editor, with Keisha N. Blain), is on The View today.

David Duchovny, Truly Like Lightning (FSG: Macmillan), appears on Live with Kelly and Ryan today, and Late Night with Seth Meyers tonight. 

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