Matthew McConaughey Memoir Tops Bestsellers Lists | Book Pulse

Greenlights by Matthew McConaughey tops both the New York Times Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list. The Silence by Don DeLillo takes No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list. The anonymous author of A Warning reveals himself. Good in Bed by Jennifer Weiner will be adapted for HBO Max, with Mindy Kaling starring and producing.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

The Silence by Don DeLillo (Scribner: S. & S.) is No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Last Druid by Terry Brooks (Del Rey: Random House) holds No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers.

Fatal Fraud by Marie Force (HTJB) is No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Shielding Aspen by Susan Stoker (Susan Stoker) comes in at No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Descent by Helen Hardt (Waterhouse: S. & S.) is No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Greenlights by Matthew McConaughey (Crown: Random House) takes the spotlight at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Accidentally Wes Anderson by Wally Koval (Voracious: Hachette) is on location at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Do You Feel Like I Do?: A Memoir by Peter Frampton with Alan Light (Hachette) comes alive at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

A Republic Under Assault: The Left's Ongoing Attack on American Freedom by Tom Fitton holds No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Battle of Brothers: William and Harry – The Inside Story of a Family in Tumult by Robert Lacey (Harper) claims No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list | USA Today Best-Selling Books

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review): No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list. 

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 11 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 12 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 15 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Catching the Wind: Edward Kennedy and the Liberal Hour, 1932-1975 by Neal Gabler (Crown: Random House): "Kennedy’s expansive life has yielded no shortage of biographies, but Gabler’s is on its way toward becoming the most complete and ambitious."

The Washington Post reviews Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath by Heather Clark (Knopf): "It is an impressive achievement representing a prizeworthy contribution to literary scholarship and biographical journalism." Also, Cary Grant: A Brilliant Disguise by Scott Eyman (S. & S.): "Mealy-mouthed? Or just the resigned sigh of a biographer who can no more get a handle on his subject than his subject could?"

NPR reviews The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X by Les Payne, Tamara Payne (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): "Definitive is a word we must use carefully when talking about biographies because it implies a degree of finality that research and new information may prove wrong. That said, [this] is, for now, the definitive biography of Malcolm X." Also, Group: How One Therapist and a Circle of Strangers Saved My Life by Christie Tate (Avid Reader Press: S. & S): "Tate sets a positive example by destigmatizing and demystifying group therapy, but she is careful never to present herself as an expert."

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week" and "October's Best Reviewed Science, Technology, and Nature Books."

Briefly Noted

A former chief of staff for the Department of Homeland Security, Miles Taylor announced he was the anonymous author of A Warning. USA Today reports the story, and provides context with "11 Trump books that offer a peek inside the White House."

As October winds down, The Guardian offers 10 horror suggestions.

The NYT picks "16 New Books to Watch For in November."

New thrillers and mysteries to check out next month, via PopSugar.

NPR recommends "3 Romances That Give You Exactly What You Want," and PopSugar notes "11 New Romance Reads That Will Keep You Warm This November."

Amazon recommends recent cookbooks.

Hoda Kotb shares her favorite books of the year with Amazon.

Publishers Weekly offers "Religion and Spirituality Books Preview: November 2020."

Barbara Hoffert has new Prepub Alert columns in LJ.

In forthcoming book news, Jason Schreier announced on Twitter that his second book, Press Reset: Ruin and Recovery in the Video Game Industry (Grand Central: Hachette), will be out May 11, 2021. Also, Tordotcom Publishing has a two-book deal with debut author Zin E. Rocklyn, with the first, Flowers for the Sea, due next year. They've also announced Hard Reboot by Django Wexler will be published in spring 2021.

Wole Soyinka is publishing his first book in nearly 50 years. This Is Lagos reports.

Entertainment Weekly has cover reveals and excerpts from Good Company by Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney and For Your Own Good by Samantha Downing, both out next year.

Read an excerpt adapted from Loved and Wanted: A Memoir of Choice, Children, and Womanhood by Christa Parravani, out Nov. 10, in Vogue.

V.E. Schwab, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue (Tor: Macmillan; LJ starred review), is the NYT “Inside the List” feature author. The paper's “By the Book” column features Steve Martin, A Wealth of Pigeons: A Cartoon Collection (Bloomsbury: Macmillan).

Electric Lit has a Q&A with Marie-Helene Bertino, Parakeet (FSG: Macmillan; LJ starred review).

Bryan Washington discusses expectations and scones with the L.A. Times.

The family of Arthur Miller is donating 692 volumes related to his writing to the New York Public Library. Fine Books reports.

According to a report from the ALA, libraries provide critical support to people who have recently been released from jails and prisons. I Love Libraries has details.

The Irish Times remembers author Julia O’Faolain, who died at age 88.

Authors on Air

Good in Bed by Jennifer Weiner will be adapted for HBO Max, with Mindy Kaling starring and producing. Tom Swift, based on the book series, is in development at the CW as a spinoff of Nancy Drew, and will feature a Black, gay lead as the title character. Miramax TV purchased the rights to Brighter Than a Thousand Suns: A Personal History of the Atomic Scientists by Robert Jungk. The Hollywood Reporter has all the news.

Here's the first trailer for The White Tiger, based on the book by Aravind Adiga that won the 2008 Man Booker Prize. It debuts in theaters in Dec.

Amazon is adapting Havenfall, based on the book by Sara Holland. Monarch Media has purchased the rights to the Do the Birds Still Sing in Hell?, the biography of Ken Scott by Horace Greasley. Netflix has renewed The Baby-Sitters Club, based on the series by Ann M. Martin, for a second season. The non-fiction finance tome The Psychology of Money: Timeless Lessons on Wealth, Greed, and Happiness by Morgan Housel will be adapted for the screen. The Netflix series adaptation of the thriller Stay Close by Harlan Coben has casting news. Deadline reports on all.

Mark Salter, The Luckiest Man: Life with John McCain (S. & S.), appears on the podcast Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady

Matthew McConaughey, Greenlights (Crown: Random House), will be on Watch What Happens Live tonight.

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