Memoirist Riva Lehrer Among the Winners of the First Disability Futures Initiative | Book Pulse

The Goldsmiths Prize, the TS Eliot Prize, and the Baillie Gifford Prize all announce their shortlists. The winners of the first Disability Futures initiative are also announced. Rick Riordan, Elin Hilderbrand, Rumaan Alam, V.E. Schwab, Tana French, and Alice Hoffman make the bestseller lists. B&N has been hacked. There is plenty of forthcoming book and adaptation news including that Stacey Abrams has a political thriller due out in May and Ava DuVernay is adapting Isabel Wilkerson’s Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents.

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Awards

The Goldsmiths Prize announces its shortlist. A Lover’s Discourse by Xiaolu Guo (Grove) makes the cut.

The TS Eliot prize announces its shortlist. Natalie Diaz, Postcolonial Love Poem: Poems (Graywolf Press: Macmillan), is among the honorees. The Guardian has coverage.

The Baillie Gifford Prize shortlist is announced. The Haunting of Alma Fielding: A True Ghost Story by Kate Summerscale (Penguin, due out in the US in April) is among the choices. Here is the video announcement. The Guardian has a report.

The winners of the first Disability Futures initiative, “a new fellowship established by the Ford Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support disabled artists” were announced yesterday. Author Riva Lehrer, Golem Girl: A Memoir (One World: Random House) is among the recipients. The NYT reports.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

The Tower of Nero (Trials of Apollo, The Book Five) by Rick Riordan (Disney-Hyperion: Hachette) takes No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Troubles in Paradise by Elin Hilderbrand (Little, Brown: Hachette) ends the trilogy at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Leave the World Behind by Rumaan Alam (Ecco: Harper) claims No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 9 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab (Tor: Macmillan; LJ starred review) remembers at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

The Searcher by Tana French (Viking: Penguin; LJ starred review) holds No. 5 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Magic Lessons: The Prequel to Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman (S. & S.) casts a spell at No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Nonfiction

Humans by Brandon Stanton (St. Martin’s Press: Macmillan) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Modern Comfort Food: A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook by Ina Garten (Clarkson Potter: Penguin) debuts at No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Is This Anything? by Jerry Seinfeld (S. & S.) makes them laugh at No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The 99% Invisible City: A Field Guide to the Hidden World of Everyday Design by Roman Mars, Kurt Kohlstedt (HMH) builds No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Undaunted: My Fight Against America's Enemies, At Home and Abroad by John O. Brennan (Celadon: Macmillan) makes a stand at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Trust: America's Best Chance by Pete Buttigieg (Liveright: W.W. Norton) offers a plan at No. 11 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World by Fareed Zakaria (W.W. Norton) considers the future at No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Let Love Rule by Lenny Kravitz (Henry Holt: Macmillan) tells its truth at No. 14 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The NYT Audio Fiction top bestseller for October is Battle Ground by Jim Butcher, read by James Marsters (Penguin Audio). The No. 1 Audio Nonfiction for October is Rage by Bob Woodward, read by Robert Petkoff (S. & S. Audio).

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 11 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 12 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 15 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Culture Warlords: My Journey Into the Dark Web of White Supremacy by Talia Lavin (Hachette): “one of the marvels of this furious book is how insolent and funny Lavin is; she refuses to soft-pedal the monstrous views she encounters, and she clearly takes pleasure in cutting them down to size.” Also, Plain Bad Heroines by Emily M. Danforth (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review): “presents a layered, farcical take on the sins of woman — though after 623 pages, it remains unclear what, exactly, her take is.” Blockchain Chicken Farm: And Other Stories of Tech in China's Countryside by Xiaowei Wang (FSG Originals: Macmillan): “fascinating … Wang has written a nuanced and thought-provoking account.” Counting: How We Use Numbers to Decide What Matters by Deborah Stone (Liveright: W.W. Norton): “Stone shows how being in thrall to numbers is misguided and dangerous, that they can often hide injustice and that we should examine and question the mechanisms through which we arrive at figures and statistics that we consider to be authoritative.”

The L.A. Times reviews She Come by It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs by Sarah Smarsh (Scribner: S. & S): “What sets Smarsh’s project apart is her focus on class, as well as the personal experiences she brings.”

NPR reviews The National Road: Dispatches From a Changing America by Tom Zoellner (Counterpoint): “an enthralling journey.” Also, Maids by Katie Skelly (Fantagraphics: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): “The theme Skelly expresses in every layer of this book is our tendency — or need, really — to underestimate anyone and anything we can't immediately assimilate: maids, girls, comics, comics about girls.”

Book Marks selects the five reviews to read this week.

Briefly Noted

In forthcoming book news, Stacey Abrams has a political thriller due out in May from Doubleday to be titled While Justice Sleeps. The Hollywood Reporter has some early details. People also has the news. Michael Cohen is writing a second book, “about the politicization of the Justice Department and his time in Trump world.” He tells Politico it will be out in 2021. Amnesty International and Angelina Jolie are working on Know Your Rights (And Claim Them). It is set for a September 2021 pub. date in the UK “and other publishers internationally.” Faber is publishing the Normal People screenplays. The Bookseller reports. There is no word yet on a US edition.

Shelf Awareness reports that B&N has been hacked. Customer “transaction history” might have been compromised.

Tor.com picks “6 Must-Read SFF Books by Jewish Authors From Around the World.”

Barbara Hoffert has new Prepub Alert columns in LJ.

People interviews Stephen King about his many TV adaptations. The magazine talks with Nick Offerman, All Rise: Audio Perambulation (Penguin). Also, an interview with Susie Yang, White Ivy (S. & S.; LJ starred review).

People features The Ministry for the Future by Kim Stanley Robinson (Orbit: Hachette). Also, a feature on Mindy KalingNothing Like I Imagined (Except for Sometimes) (Audible).

Entertainment Weekly showcases Emily M. Danforth, Plain Bad Heroines (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review).

The NYT spotlights Marie Lu, Skyhunter (Roaring Brook Press: Macmillan), in the “Inside The List” column.

The Guardian has a feature on Nobel winner Louise Glück.

The L.A. Times highlights And Now She's Gone by Rachel Howzell Hall (Forge: Macmillan).

Shondaland interviews Jes Wolfe, the CEO of Rebel Girls. The company’s newest book is Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls: 100 Immigrant Women Who Changed the World by Elena Favilli (Timbuktu Labs: S. & S.). Also, an interview with Victoria Bond, author of the Zora & Me trilogy (Candlewick).

The Guardian interviews Bernard Cornwell, War Lord (Harper).

The Washington Post showcases Alexis de Tocqueville: Democracy in America: A new translation by Arthur Goldhammer (Library of America: Penguin).

CrimeReads focuses on “The Agatha Christie Centennial.”

In her keynote at the Frankfurter Buchmesse’s Publishing Insights conference, Bernardine Evaristo talks about the critical importance of diversity in publishing. Publishing Perspectives reports.

Bitch Media writes about publishing and diversity in an piece entitled, “#OwnVoices, Outing, and the Ongoing Quest for Authenticity.”

The NYT writes “Your Local Bookstore Wants You to Know That It’s Struggling.”

The NYT shares what some staff read during their time off.

Authors on Air

Ava DuVernay will "direct, write and produce” the adaptation of Isabel Wilkerson’s Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents. Sammy Davis Jr.: My Father by Davis’ daughter Tracey Davis and Dolores A. Barclay is headed to the movies. Dean Koontz’s Devoted is set for TV. Dexter is getting a reboot at Showtime. The show is based on the series by Jeff Lindsay. Gabrielle Union options The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls by Anissa Gray. Bobby Smith Jr. and author Brenda Jackson are creating a production company to “develop and produce titles from Jackson’s works.” Deadline reports on all.

I Know What You Did Last Summer by Lois Duncan is headed to Amazon. The Hollywood Reporter has the news.

A new series adaptation of Fannie Flagg’s Fried Green Tomatoes is set for NBC with Reba McEntire to star and Norman Lear to executive produce. Variety has details.

NPR’s All Things Considered interviews Andrew Cuomo, American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic (Crown: Random House).

Deadline reports on the new A Christmas Carol featurette.

Hillbilly Elegy gets a trailer. It is based on the book by J.D. Vance and debuts on Netflix on Nov. 24.

Jiu Jitsu gets a trailer. Tor.com reports it is based on the comics by Logothetis and Jim McGrath and premieres on Nov. 20.

Firefly Lane gets a teaser. It is based on the book by Kristin Hannah and will debut on Netflix in 2021.

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Ann Benton

Just heard Golem Girl author Riva Lehrer on NPR. She has a gorgeous way of speaking about her memoir. I can't wait to read this title! AB, MLS

Posted : Oct 15, 2020 05:07


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