'Deacon King Kong' and 'Fathoms' Win Carnegie Medals | Book Pulse

Deacon King Kong by James McBride wins ALA's 2021 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction, and Fathoms: The World in the Whale by Rebecca Giggs wins the 2021 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction. The RUSA/CODES Book and Media Awards are also announced. Hunter Biden, President Joe Biden's son, will publish the memoir Beautiful Things on April 6. Grey's Anatomy fans will want to bookmark How to Save A Life, the forthcoming book from Lynette Rice that's based on 80 interviews with those involved in the show. Time has a special project, "The Renaissance Is Black," which features an introduction by Ibram X. Kendi, several books as part of "The 25 Defining Works of the Black Renaissance," and more. Salma Hayek’s production company is developing A Boob’s Life by Leslie Lehr as a series. Plus, a video game that lets you use authors like Saeed Jones, Jia Tolentino, and Tony Tulathimmute as fighters.

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Awards and Forthcoming Books

Deacon King Kong by James McBride (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review) wins ALA's 2021 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. Fathoms: The World in the Whale by Rebecca Giggs (S. & S.) wins the 2021 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction. More information on the winners and the finalists is here.

The RUSA/CODES Book and Media Awards, including Notable Books, The Reading List, and the Listen LIst, were announced yesterday afternoon.

Hunter Biden, President Joe Biden's son, will publish a memoir this spring. Beautiful Things, written with Drew Jubera (Gallery: S. & S.) is due out April 6. The Associated Press and the NYT have coverage.

Grey's Anatomy fans will want to bookmark How to Save A Life (St. Martin's: Macmillan), the forthcoming book from Lynette Rice that's based on 80 interviews with those involved in the show. Entertainment Weekly has details on the book, which is by the magazine's editor-at-large. 

Morgan Harper Nichols announced her new book, How Far You Have Come: Musings on Beauty and Courage (Zondervan: HarperCollins Christian), will be out April 6.

T.J. Newman, a former flight attendant who says she developed the plotline for her forthcoming thriller Falling (Avid Reader: S. & S.) while up in the skies working, signed a 7-figure, 2-book deal. The Associated Press has details.

The Millions suggests "Writers to Watch: Spring 2021."

Barbara Hoffert looks at "Poetry Titles To Watch 2021" in LJ

Page to Screen

Feb. 5:

Minamata, based on the book by Aileen Mioko Smith and Eugene Smith. Theatrical Release. Reviews | Trailer

Feb. 8: 

Black Lightning, which has associated titles. The CW. No reviews | Trailer

Reviews

NPR reviews Good Neighbors by Sarah Langan (Atria: S. & S.): "Langan cuts to the heart of upper middle class lives like a skilled surgeon and exposes the rotten realities behind manicured lawns and perfect families, and the result is horrifically plausible."

The Washington Post reviews When Harry Met Minnie: A True Story of Love and Friendship by Martha Teichner (Celadon: Macmillan): "Teichner brings an enjoyably light (though sometimes too cutesy) touch to scenes focused on these developing relationships." Also, Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019 edited by Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): "This project is a vital addition to that curriculum on race in America and should serve as a gateway to the solo works of all the voices in Kendi and Blain’s impressive choir." City of a Thousand Gates by Rebecca Sacks (Harper): "Sacks is an extraordinarily gifted writer whose intelligence, compassion and skill on both the sentence and tension level rise to meet her ambition." The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women and Women to Medicine by Janice P. Nimura (W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): "...the book moves at a lively pace." Robert E. Lee and Me: A Southerner's Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause by Ty Seidule (St. Martin's: Macmillan; LJ starred review): "At this pivotal moment, when we are debating some of the most painful aspects of our history, Seidule’s unsparing assessment of the Lost Cause provides an indispensable contribution to the discussion." A Recipe for Daphne by Nektaria Anastasiadou (Hoopoe): "It’s also a novel to be thoroughly savored, from its enticing culinary elements to its charming love stories." American Baby: A Mother, a Child, and the Shadow History of Adoption by Gabrielle Glaser (Viking: Penguin): "The intimate story of Glaser’s subjects makes her book compelling, but the societal dots she’s able to connect make it important."

The L.A. Times reviews Water Memory by Daniel Pyne (Thomas & Mercer: Amazon): "...ripping good yarn." Also, brief reviews of five new mysteries.

Book Marks’ "Best Reviewed Books of the Week."

Briefly Noted

Time has a special project, "The Renaissance Is Black,” which features an introduction by Ibram X. Kendi, several books as part of "The 25 Defining Works of the Black Renaissance," a discussion between Black women novelists, and a conversation between Michelle Obama and poet Amanda Gorman, who is featured on the issue's cover

BuzzFeed suggests "25 Books By Black Authors To Add To Your Reading List This Month."

Amazon lists "Must-read spring books by Black authors."

Datebook enlists several authors to recommend books to read this Black History Month.

Tor.com looks at new SFF YA books out this month

CrimeReads suggests 10 crime novels out in February.

The Washington Post offers "14 love stories to fill the void."

Publishers Weekly previews books coming out next week.

Vulture suggests 9 recent releases.

The NYT recommends 10 books out this week. Also, audiobooks of celebrity memoirs that are read by the authors.

Louise Bernice Halfe, also known as Sky Dancer, is Canada's new parliamentary poet laureate. The CBC has details.

Courtney Summers, The Project (Wednesday: Macmillan), answers Entertainment Weekly's “What's In A Page” questions. Also, a Q&A with Jen Silverman, We Play Ourselves (Random House).

Michael Lowenthal shares how the cover of Sex with Strangers (Univ. of Wisconsin) came to be with The Rumpus.

The NYT's "By the Book" column features Elizabeth Kolbert, Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future (Crown: Random House; LJ starred review). 

Kirkus interviews Kristin Cashore, Winterkeep (Dial: Penguin).

Chang-rae Lee discusses My Year Abroad (Riverhead: Penguin) with Electric Lit.

Jane Smiley shares "The books that made me" with The Guardian.

Autostraddle speaks with Emily Hashimoto about A World Between (The Feminist Press at CUNY).

The Seattle Times talks with Lawrence Wright, The End of October (Knopf), about writing about pandemics.

The Shelf Awareness "Reading with…" column features Katherine Seligman, At the Edge of the Haight (Algonquin: Workman).

Book Riot delves into the history of the term "bookworm."

This weekend, play Street Writer, an homage to the video game Street Fighter, but with authors like Saeed Jones, Jia Tolentino, and Tony Tulathimmute as fighters. Lit Hub has the origin story.

Authors on Air

Salma Hayek’s production company is developing A Boob’s Life by Leslie Lehr (Pegasus: S. & S.) as a series for HBO Max. Deadline reports.

Eugene Richardson discusses Epidemic Illusions: On the Coloniality of Global Public Health (MIT) on NPR's Goats and Sodas.

"There is a long and illustrious history of people declaring, mistakenly, that New York City is dead," says Christopher Bonanos, editor of The Encyclopedia of New York (Avid Reader: S. &S.), on The Maris Review podcast.

Dolly Parton, Dolly Parton, Songteller: My Life in Lyrics (Chronicle), appears on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.

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