Booker Prize Longlist Showcases Women & Debut Authors | Book Pulse

The longlist for the Booker Prize is announced. Hilary Mantel is in the running for a third, and potentially record win, but there are plenty of debut authors in the mix too. Nine of the 13 who made the cut are women. CrimeReads writes, “True Crime Has Been Having a Moment for Three Centuries. But the New Era Is Different.” Oprah Winfrey is starting a new Apple TV+ interview series. Her first guest will be Ibram X. Kendi, How to Be an Antiracist. Didn't See That Coming: Putting Life Back Together When Your World Falls Apart by Rachel Hollis is the hot book of the morning. The Witcher gets a prequel series, set 1,200 years earlier. The Emmy nominations will be announced later today.

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Awards

 

 

 

 

 

 

The longlist for the Booker Prize is announced. Hilary Mantel is in the running for a third, and potentially record, win. In contrast to Mantel’s repeat appearance, there are a large number of debut authors on the list and nine of the 13 who made the cut are women. The shortlist of six titles will be announced in September. The NYT has the full list and a report. So does The Guardian and Entertainment Weekly

Irenosen Okojie wins the Caine prize for African writing. Her most recent collection is Speak Gigantular (Jacaranda). The Guardian has a report.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir by Natasha Trethewey (Ecco: Harper; LJ starred review), “It is a controlled burn of chaos and intellection; it is a memoir that will really lay you out.” Also, A Star Is Bored by Byron Lane (Henry Holt: Macmillan): “wildly funny and irreverent.” Fathoms: The World in the Whale by Rebecca Giggs (S. & S.): “delving, haunted and poetic.” The Butterfly Lampshade by Aimee Bender (Doubleday: Random House): “[a] compact surrealist memory box of a novel.” The Hunting of Hillary: The Forty-Year Campaign to Destroy Hillary Clinton by Michael D'Antonio (Thomas Dunne Books: Macmillan): “at its most interesting when it relates the details of the complicated, twisty scandals that have been hyped up and then boiled down into catchphrases.” A Dominant Character: The Radical Science and Restless Politics of J. B. S. Haldane by Samanth Subramanian (W. W. Norton): “the best Haldane biography yet.” Eat the Buddha: Life and Death in a Tibetan Town by Barbara Demick (Random House): “a brilliantly reported and eye-opening work of narrative nonfiction.” Last Mission to Tokyo: The Extraordinary Story of the Doolittle Raiders and Their Final Fight for Justice by Michel Paradis (S. & S.): “Paradis, who writes with warm affection for the Doolittle flyboys and celebrates their mission, notes that Doolittle instructed his airmen to avoid nonmilitary targets. Yet his book makes it uncomfortably clear that they may well have killed Japanese civilians.” Empire of Wild by Cherie Dimaline (William Morrow: Harper): “Dimaline here turns an old story into something newly haunting and resonant.” To Start a War: How the Bush Administration Took America into Iraq by Robert Draper (Penguin): “offers the most comprehensive account of the administration’s road to war, underscoring that Bush was indeed The Decider when it came to Iraq — there was never any debate about not overthrowing Hussein.”  Lastly, a piece on celebrity books.

Vulture reviews Intimations: Six Essays by Zadie Smith (Penguin), headlining that it “Makes a Joyful Case for Inconsistency.”

The Washington Post reviews I Hold a Wolf by the Ears: Stories by Laura van den Berg (FSG: Macmillan): “A similar richness of reading pleasures brims in every one of these 11 tales … To pick a best story is beyond me; now I favor “Volcano House,” now “Karolina,” and now the closer, also the title piece.” Also, Afterland by Lauren Beukes, (Muholland Books: Hachette): “for those whose taste for dystopian suspense is undiminished, Beukes’s tale of a mother and son making their way across a post-pandemic-ravaged landscape is prescient and taut.” The Death of Vivek Oji by Akwaeke Emezi (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review): “There’s just no way to finish this powerful novel and not feel more deeply than ever the ghastly consequences of intolerance. But in these intense pages of tightly coiled desire and dread, Emezi has once again encouraged us to embrace a fuller spectrum of human experience.”

 USA Today reviews Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir by Natasha Trethewey (Ecco: Harper; LJ starred review), giving it a perfect four stars and calling it “exquisitely written, elegiac.” Also, It Is Wood, It Is Stone by Gabriella Burnham (One World: Random House), giving it three stars and writing, “Under a less deft hand, this could be hokey. But one of the greatest draws … is Burnham’s exquisite prose.”

The Atlantic reviews Putin's People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took On the West by Catherine Belton (FSG: Macmillan): “While many of these stories have been written before, Belton puts them in the larger context. The hard truth is that Trump was not exceptional. He was just another amoral Western businessman, one of many whom the ex-KGB elite have promoted and sponsored around the world, with the hope that they might eventually be of some political or commercial use.”

Tor.com reviews Sensation Machines by Adam Wilson (Soho: Random House): “Wilson’s earlier fiction shares with this novel a penchant for wry dialogue, comic setpieces, and a sense of his characters being morally tested. The speculative elements in this novel help elevate those moral concerns to a much higher level.”

Slate reviews Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Del Rey: Random House), calling it “Part du Maurier, Part del Toro” and writing that it “is a thriller with more on its mind than just getting you to keep turning the pages.”

Briefly Noted

The Millions has “Writers to Watch: Fall 2020.”

Bustle picks “The Best New Books Out The Week Of July 27.”

The Washington Post picks “Ten books to read in August.”

Elle suggests “The 37 Best New Books of Summer 2020.”

BuzzFeed writes that “The Future Of True Crime Will Have To Be Different.”

Katherine Center, What You Wish For (St. Martin’s: Macmillan), has summer reading picks for Amazon.

BuzzFeed has a story excerpt from Sansei and Sensibility by Karen Tei Yamashita (Coffee House Press).

Entertainment Weekly excerpts The Smallest Lights in the Universe by Sara Seager (Crown: Random House; LJ starred review). Also, an excerpt of Plain Bad Heroines by emily m. danforth (text) and Sara Lautman (illus.) (William Morrow: Harper). There are also excerpts for Betty by Tiffany McDaniel (Knopf) and for Migrations by Charlotte McConaghy (Flatiron Books: Macmillan; LJ starred review). Lastly, a book trailer for Aftershocks by Nadia Owusu (S. & S.).

Electric Lit interviews Catherine Lacey, Pew (FSG: Macmillan).

Entertainment Weekly interviews Yiyun Li, Must I Go (Random House).

Rumaan Alam interviews Adrian Tomine, The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist (Drawn and Quarterly: Macmillan; LJ starred review) for Slate.

Amazon interviews S.A. Cosby, Blacktop Wasteland (Flatiron Books: Macmillan; LJ starred review) and has an interview with the author behind Becoming Duchess Goldblatt (HMH).

USA Today features You Look So Much Better in Person: True Stories of Absurdity and Success by Al Roker (Hachette Go).

The Washington Post has a report of their interview with Mary Trump, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man (S. & S.).

CrimeReads writes “True Crime Has Been Having a Moment for Three Centuries. But the New Era Is Different.”

Didn't See That Coming: Putting Life Back Together When Your World Falls Apart by Rachel Hollis (Dey Street Books: Harper) is the hot book of the morning, jumping to the top of Amazon’s Movers & Shakers chart.

Authors on Air

The Witcher gets a prequel series with Netflix. It is set 1,200 years earlier and is to be called The Witcher: Blood Origin. Oprah Winfrey is starting a new Apple TV+ interview series. Her first guest will be Ibram X. Kendi, How to Be an Antiracist. It begins on July 30. HBO options The First Shot by Brendan Borrell. A forthcoming nonfiction book about the race to develop a vaccine for Covid. Deadline reports.

Shania Twain is going to adapt Debbie Macomber’s “Heart Of Texas” books. The Country Note reports.

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Mike Birbiglia and J. Hope Stein, The New One: Painfully True Stories from a Reluctant Dad (Grand Central: Hachette). Also, there is an interview with Norman Eisen, A Case for the American People: The United States v. Donald J. Trump (Crown: Random House). NPR’s It’s Been a Minute features Big Friendship: How We Keep Each Other Close by Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman, (S. & S.).

The Emmy nominations will be announced later today. The NYT has a guide.

Star Trek: Discovery Season 3 premieres on October 15th on CBS All Access. Tor.com has a report.

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Diane McClosky

No publications from conservative authors? I find that difficult to believe.
When we talk about diversity and inclusion at libraries, we should include diversity and inclusion of political thought, as well. I know ALA and LJ have their darlings (as evidenced by the guest list at ALA's conventions) but must you be so one-sided in your recommendations? Please do better.

Posted : Jul 28, 2020 06:41


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