New to the Bestseller Lists, Nov. 8, 2018 | Book Pulse

Elevation by Stephen King and Beastie Boys Book by Michael Diamond, Adam Horovitz top the bestseller lists today. Librarians are celebrated and book exhibitions make news. A new study in the UK finds that reading can combat loneliness as well as "assist with social mobility and mental health, and even 'hold off' dementia." The new Grinch movie is set to open to big box office.

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New to the Bestseller Lists

[Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books]








Fiction

Elevation by Stephen King (Scribner: S. & S): Sparkles at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 3 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Meltdown (Diary of a Wimpy Kid Book 13) by Jeff Kinney (Amulet Books: ABRAMS): Debuts at No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Dark Sacred Night by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown: Hachette): Opens at No. 3 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Archangel's Prophecy by Nalini Singh (Berkley: Penguin): Lands at No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Alice Isn't Dead by Joseph Fink (Harper Perennial): Rounds out the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list at No. 15.








Nonfiction

Beastie Boys Book by Michael Diamond, Adam Horovitz (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): Debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 10 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Hindsight: & All the Things I Can't See in Front of Me by Justin Timberlake (Harper Design): Takes the No. 2 spot on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and rounds out the USA Today Best-Selling Books list accounting at No. 14.

Medical Medium Liver Rescue: Answers to Eczema, Psoriasis, Diabetes, Strep, Acne, Gout, Bloating, Gallstones, Adrenal Stress, Fatigue, Fatty Liver, Weight Issues, SIBO & Autoimmune Disease by Anthony William (Hay House: Penguin): Takes No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff by Abbi Jacobson (Grand Central: Hachette): Lands at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Audio

The monthly audiobook lists are out. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, read by Cassandra Campbell tops the NYT Audio Fiction list while Ship of Fools: How a Selfish Ruling Class Is Bringing America to the Brink of Revolution written and read by Tucker Carlson (S. & S. Audio) tops the NYT Audio Nonfiction list.

Reviews

The NYT reviews Behold, America: The Entangled History of "America First" and "the American Dream" by Sarah Churchwell (Basic: Hachette): "This is a timely book. It’s also a provocative one ... [it] illuminates how much history takes place in the gap between what people say and what they do."

The Washington Post reviews Someone Like Me by M.R. Carey (Orbit: Hachette): "a spooky, wrenching, exhilarating ghost story-cum-thriller that manages to put a fresh, almost science-fictional spin on its specters and spooks."

USA Today reviews Beyond the Call: Three Women on the Front Lines in Afghanistan by Eileen Rivers (Da Capo: Hachette), giving it 3 out of 4 stars and writing Rivers "ably documents how females in arms, who represent 16 percent of America’s military, make their nation stronger."

NPR reviews Unholy Land by Lavie Tidhar (Tachyon): "Tidhar is a genius at conjuring realities that are just two steps to the left of our own — places that look and smell and feel real, if just a bit hauntingly alien."

Briefly Noted

Shondaland picks "The 19 Best Books of 2018 (So Far)."

LitHub highlights "5 Sci-Fi and Fantasy Books to Look Out For in November."

George R.R. Martin lets slip that one of the HBO spin-off GOT shows might/will be about dragons, only to have to "apologize and retract" according to Vanity Fair.

Entertainment WeeklyexcerptsQueen of Air and Darkness by Cassandra Clare (Margaret K. McElderry Book: S. & S.).

The NYT has an essay on "What Pokémon Can Teach Us About Fiction."

The Guardian reports on a new study in the UK that reading can combat loneliness as well as "assist with social mobility and mental health, and even 'hold off' dementia." The UK is in a library crisis due to cuts in funding and closures (and suggestions they be run by volunteers). Here is a link to the study.

The NYT reports that the used book and antiquarian bookseller protest against AbeBooks (a subsidiary of Amazon) has worked.

Entertainment Weekly has the news that J.K. Rowling is the victim of theft and is suing an employee she alleges stole Hogwarts merchandise and more.

The Guardiancelebrates heroic and brave librarians and writes about the new display at Oxford University of the Bodleian Library’s Phi collection of explicit/censored books. In another report on a book exhibition, The New Republic looks at our oldest books, on display as part of the British Library's exhibition “Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War.”

The Washington Post considers what new books might come from this new election. In related news, The Guardian reports that UK readers are coping with Trump and Brexit by reading political books, pushing sales in the category up 50%. Also in the paper, a roundup of the books that make the case about "how Russia influences the world." And speaking of reading and politics, the author of the Bigfoot erotica book won his election in Virginia on Tuesday. The LA Times reports.

HuffPost writes about LGBTQ censorship in Russia.

Michael Dirda looks at works dealing with WWI for the Washington Post.

The GuardianinterviewsPosy Simmonds.

PBS NewsHourinterviews Katie Kitamura, A Separation (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review).

Nicolas Mathieu has won the Goncourt Prize, the top French literary honor, for Leurs Enfants Après Eux. It is not yet published in the US but will come out from Other Press in 2019, under the title The Children Who Came After Them. The NYT has the details.

The Bookseller reports that two UK bookstores have issued their shortlists/finalists for books of the year: Waterstones and Blackwell's. (more on Waterstones here).

Book critic Christopher Lehmann-Haupt has died. The NYT reports.

Authors on Air

Vultureshowcases the adaptation of My Brilliant Friend.

The NYTprofiles Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, the showrunner of both Riverdale and Chilling Adventures of Sabrina.

A live comedy show featuring celebrities reading from celebrity-written books is heading to Broadway. Vulture has details.

Vanity Fair reviews The Girl in the Spider's Web: "It’s the sloppy kind of corporate pastiche, doing cursory homage to what worked in the original and then gunking it all up with witless embellishment."

Deadline Hollywood writes that the new The Grinch adaptation is set to open big this weekend. Also, Billion Dollar Whale: The Man Who Fooled Wall Street, Hollywood, and the World by Tom Wright, Bradley Hope (Hachette) is headed to the movies. The forthcoming The League of Wives: The Untold Story of the Women Who Took on the U.S. Government to Bring Their Husbands Home by Heath Hardage Lee (St. Martin's: Macmillan) is as well, with Reese Witherspoon set to produce. HBO is adapting You Should Have Known by Jean Hanff Korelitz (Grand Central: Hachette), which will star Nicole Kidman. Also, Netflix is planning an animated spin-off of its adaptation of Richard K. Morgan's Altered Carbon.

Aquaman gets some posters. The Hollywood Reporter has the images. Also, more casting news for the adaptation of Jack London's Call of the Wild. Cara Gee, The Expanse, is joining the team. THR reviews Dr. Seuss’The Grinch film, calling it "Just what the Dr. would've ordered." Variety calls it "buoyant and agreeable entertainment."

April Ryan, Under Fire: Reporting from the Front Lines of the Trump White House (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers) will be on The View today. Kirsten Gillibrand, Bold & Brave: Ten Heroes Who Won Women the Right to Vote illustrated by Maira Kalman (Knopf Books for Young Readers), will be on Stephen Colbert. Joanna Gaines, Homebody: A Guide to Creating Spaces You Never Want to Leave (Harper Design), will be on the Tonight Show.

Mowgil: Legend of the Jungle gets another trailer.

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