Bernardine Evaristo, Molly Stern & Margaret Busby Make News | Book Pulse

Bernardine Evaristo will chair the judging panel for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2021. Molly Stern, who was publisher of Crown before the shake-up at PRH, creates a new publishing company called Zando. Margaret Busby, an important voice in UK publishing, takes center stage. A Time for Mercy by John Grisham tops the bestseller list. Caste by Isabel Wilkerson soars to the top of the NYT nonfiction list. Suzanne Palmer wins the Theodore Sturgeon Award for “Waterlines.” There is a second trailer out for The Underground Railroad.

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Women Change Publishing

Bernardine Evaristo will chair the judging panel for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2021. The Bookseller has details.

The NYT reports on a new publishing company created by Molly Stern, who was publisher of Crown before the shake-up at PRH. The paper writes that the company, called Zando, will have an “unusual marketing and publicity model. Rather than relying chiefly on bookstores, retailers, advertising and other traditional channels to promote authors, she plans to team up with high-profile individuals, companies and brands, who will act as publishing partners and promote books to their fans and customers … aligning authors with cultural ambassadors of sorts, Zando aims to deploy star power to keep its books from drowning in a sea of online content.” The story includes this RA-relevant quote from Stern: “Discoverability is a real crisis … You felt that you were publishing into a vacuum … To find an audience is increasingly complicated.”

The Guardian has a feature on Margaret Busby, "Britain's first black female publisher" who "set up her own company, publishing everyone from James Ellroy to the Worst Witch series, and changing Britain for the better, book by book.”

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

A Time for Mercy by John Grisham (Doubleday: Random House) debuts at No. 1 on both the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Jingle All the Way by Debbie Macomber (Ballantine: Random House) celebrates the season at No. 10 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Invisible Girl by Lisa Jewell (Atria: S. & S.; LJ starred review) holds No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list.

Return to Virgin River by Robyn Carr (Harper) claims No. 12 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

This Just Speaks to Me: Words to Live By Every Day by Hoda Kotb (G.P. Putnam’s Sons: Penguin) offers wisdom at No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic by Andrew Cuomo (Crown: Random House) tells his truth at No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Antiracist Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House; LJ starred review): No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Random House): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 6 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 8 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (One World: Random House): No. 9 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (New Press): No. 10 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 13 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Reviews

NPR reviews The Nightworkers by Brian Selfon (MCD: Macmillan): “a dark slice of Brooklyn noir with a family drama at its core … the arrival of a promising voice.” Also, Ring Shout by P. Djèlí Clark (Tordotcom: Macmillan; LJ starred review): “a demonic horror twist on the Jim Crow South … I finished my first reading of Ring Shout easily, in a single sitting; once the story picks up, it keeps hitting hard, climbing — no soaring — to a cinematic finish, with character beats that hit beautifully.” Dark Archives: A Librarian's Investigation into the Science and History of Books Bound in Human Skin by Megan Rosenbloom (FSG: Macmillan): “Delightful and propulsive, Rosenbloom's measured balance of bloody thrills with historical fact and ethical nuance.”

The L.A. Times reviews Plain Bad Heroines by Emily M. Danforth, illustrated by Sara Lautman (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review): “a book about a book, layers on the flourishes, but it‚also just plain fun … a queer historical meta-novel.”

The Washington Post reviews Max Jacob: A Life in Art and Letters by Rosanna Warren (W.W. Norton): “isn’t sprightly, but it is definitive and chockablock with entertaining anecdotes.”

The NYT reviews Billion Dollar Loser: The Epic Rise and Spectacular Fall of Adam Neumann and WeWork by Reeves Wiedeman (Little, Brown: Hachette): “would be absorbing enough were it just about one man’s grandiosity, but Wiedeman has a larger argument to make about what Neumann represents … the embodiment of a confidence game that flourished in the last decade.” Also, A World Beneath the Sands: The Golden Age of Egyptology by Toby Wilkinson (W.W. Norton): “excellent … Wilkinson is a consummate historian.”

Briefly Noted

Suzanne Palmer wins the Theodore Sturgeon Award for her story “Waterlines.” Tor.com reports. Here is the story, published in the July/August 2019 edition of Asimov’s Science Fiction.

Bustle picks “The Best Books Of 2020.”

Barbara Hoffert has a new "PrePub Alert" column out in LJ

USA Today selects “Four spooky new horror tomes to set mood for Halloween from Joe Hill, Joyce Carol Oates, more.”

The Guardian has “Unquiet spirits: the lost female ghost-story writers returning to haunt us.”

Tor.com offers “9 Complicated Female Narrators Who Will Surprise You.”

Natalie Portman picks her favorite books of the year for Amazon.

In forthcoming book news, Tor.com reveals the cover for The Veiled Throne by Ken Liu (Gallery/Saga Press: S. & S.). Also, Tordotcom Publishing has a two-book deal with debut author Joma West. The first, Face, will publish in early 2022.

Tor.com excerpts Crown of Bones by A.K. Wilder (Entangled: Teen: Macmillan).

Entertainment Weekly has an audio excerpt of Matthew McConaughey reading Greenlights (Random House Audiobooks). Vulture has reporting on some of what McConaughey discloses in his memoir.

Micheline Aharonian Marcom, The New American (S. & S.: LJ starred review) selects “8 Epic Journeys in Literature” for Electric Lit.

The Atlantic features Snow by John Banville (Hanover Square: Harper).

NPR’s column "Are You There God? It's Me, Juanita," features Flamer by Mike Curato (Henry Holt: Macmillan; SLJ starred review).

LifeHacker spotlights Preeti Chhibber, Star Wars A Jedi You Will Be (Disney Lucasfilm Press: Hachette), in its “How I Work” column.

The NYT “Inside the List” features Pete Buttigieg, Trust: America's Best Chance (Liveright: W.W. Norton).

Tor.com reports on The Africanfuturism: An Anthology, from Brittle Paper magazine, which is free to download.

The NYT prints the poem “Good Deeds” by Rachel Eliza Griffiths, as selected by Naomi Shihab Nye.

CrimeReads has a feature on Edward Gorey's set designs for the 1970s Broadway show Dracula.

Tor.com is hosting a free trivia night with Sarah Gailey, Christopher Paolini, P. Djèlí Clark, A.K. Larkwood, and Mark Oshiro on November 11.

Authors on Air

NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Sigrid Nunez, What Are You Going Through (Riverhead: Penguin; LJ starred review). Also, a story on Netflix’s The Queen's Gambit, based on the book by Walter Tevis.

Daisy Edgar-Jones will star in the adaptation of Where the Crawdads Sing. IMDb TV is adapting High School by Tegan and Sara Quin. The comic Mercy Sparx by Josh Blaylock is headed to the movies. Candyman gets shifted to August 2021. Legally Blonde 3 will be released May, 2022. Deadline reports.

The Hollywood Reporter has news about the Shonda Rhimes adaptation of Julia Quinn’s Bridgerton series, to air on Netflix.

Variety reports that “Jared Leto Reprising Joker Role for Zack Snyder’s Justice League.”

Andrew Cuomo, American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic (Crown: Random House), will be on with Stephen Colbert tonight.

There is a second trailer out for The Underground Railroad. The film is based on the book by Colson Whitehead. It will air on Amazon but a date has yet to be announced.

The Life Ahead gets a trailer. It is based on the book The Life Before Us by Romain Gary and will air on Netflix on Nov. 13. Town & Country has coverage too.

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