'Becoming' by Michelle Obama Gets Young Readers Edition | Book Pulse

Penguin Random House will publish a young readers edition of Becoming by Michelle Obama on March 2. The Russian by James Patterson and James O. Born and Just as I Am by Cicely Tyson lead the NYT Best Sellers and the USA Today Best-Selling Books lists. The 2021 United States Artists Fellows were announced, and among those honored are 8 writers, including Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, Danez Smith, and Ocean Vuong. A new podcast about library workers, librarypunk, has launched. Former Baltimore Ravens player Jason Brown discusses Centered: Trading Your Plans for a Life That Matters on The Today Show.

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New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

Fiction

The Russian by James Patterson and James O. Born (Little, Brown: Hachette) debuts at No. 1 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Nonfiction

Just as I Am by Cicely Tyson (HarperCollins) is No. 2 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Let Me Tell You What I Mean by Joan Didion (Knopf: Random House) starts at No. 6 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Extraterrestrial: The First Sign of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth by Avi Loeb (HMH) lands at No. 7 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list. 

The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto by Charles M. Blow (Harper) begins at No. 9 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list. 

Girl With No Job: The Crazy Beautiful Life of an Instagram Thirst Monster by Claudia Oshry (Gallery: S. & S.) earns No. 12 on the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list. 

Audio

The NYT Audio Fiction top bestseller for February is The Duke and I by Julia Quinn (Romantic Sounds Audio). The No. 1 Audio Nonfiction for February is once again A Promised Land by Barack Obama (Random House Audio).

Reviews

NPR reviews The Copenhagen Trilogy by Tove Ditlevsen and translated by Tiina Nunnally (FSG: Macmillan): "Like Grace Paley and Alice Munro, Ditlevsen's a master of compression who can capture the whole story of a marriage in a couple of pages."

The NYT reviews Sybille Bedford: A Life by Selina Hastings (Knopf: Random House): "It is to be hoped that 'Sybille Bedford,' a largely sympathetic and very readable biography, will bring new readers to Bedford’s oeuvre.

The L.A.Times reviews The Removed by Brandon Hobson (Ecco: HarperCollins; LJ starred review): "What sets this novel apart, what stamps it as extraordinary, is the way it interweaves the grimly familiar with elements of fantasy, thereby illuminating both present and past."

Book Marks picks “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Penguin Random House will publish a young readers edition of Becoming by Michelle Obama on March 2. The Associated Press has info.

The 2021 United States Artists (USA) Fellows were announced. Among those honored are 8 writers, including Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, Danez Smith, and Ocean Vuong. 

LeVar Burton is named the inaugural PEN/Faulkner Literary Champion. The virtual celebration to honor Burton and the fiction finalists takes place May 10.

Lit Hub recommends "25+ new releases from black authors to keep you reading all year long."

Entertainment Weekly suggests "new books worth reading this February in honor of Black History Month." 

USA Today has "10 must-read Black History Month book recommendations."

Isabel Wilkerson, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents (Random House; LJ starred review), picks "six books that address the history and lived experiences of African-Americans" for Amazon.

GMA picks 24 great books out this month.

Shelf Awareness looks at new books out next week

The Millions recommends the best poetry out in February.

NPR offers part 3 of its 2021 poetry preview.

Tor.com rounds up this month's new science fiction and fantasy books. 

The CBC lists "58 Canadian works of fiction coming out in spring 2021."

NYT Book Review editors share what they're currently reading.

NYPL lists the books connected to Golden Globe nominees.

Electric Lit suggests "11 Thrillers Set in Toxic Workplaces."

Avni Doshi, Burnt Sugar (Overlook: Abrams), shares 10 of her favorite books about motherhood with Lit Hub.

Elle's "Shelf Life" column features Chang-rae Lee, My Year Abroad (Riverhead: Penguin).

Dr. Ibram X. Kendi and Dr. Keisha N. Blain, editors of Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019 (One World: Random House; LJ starred review), talk with Shondaland about their work.

Anna Malaika Tubbs discusses The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation (Flatiron: Macmillan) with USA Today.

Lambda Literary interviews Sally Bellerose, Fishwives (Bywater).

The NYT goes "Inside the List" with Hafsah Faizal, We Free the Stars (FSG: Macmillan). 

Russell Shorto, Smalltime: A Story of My Family and the Mob (W. W. Norton), describes "eight things about the mob that might be unbelievable if they weren’t true" at BookPage.

Shondaland has a Q&A with Anna Carey, This Is Not the Jess Show (Quirk: Random House).

The NYT looks at the challenges facing Stephen Phillips and his biography of writer Christopher Hitchens, which stem from resistance by his widow and his literary agent. Also, how a YouTube star faced backlash from France's literary crowd after her book was published.

Teen Vogue looks into the movement to remove police from libraries.

A new podcast about library workers, librarypunk, has launched.

Poetry magazine is facing criticism after publishing a poem by a convicted sex offender. The Guardian has details.

Authors on Air

"I wanted to point out, of course, that at that other end, there are costs, that there's a price to all our consumption and the globalization that's been happening generally," says Chang-rae Lee, My Year Abroad (Riverhead: Penguin), on NPR's All Things Considered.

Former Baltimore Ravens player Jason Brown discusses Centered: Trading Your Plans for a Life That Matters (WaterBrook: Random House) on The Today Show.

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