John Bolton Dominates Book Coverage | Book Pulse

For a second week in a row, antiracist titles fill the bestseller lists. EarlyWord’s June GalleyChat, focused on black authors, is posted. Shaun Tan makes history by winning the Kate Greenaway medal for Tales from the Inner City. The Literary Landmark status of Beauvoir, the house of Confederate president Jefferson Davis, has been rescinded. John Bolton’s book makes the papers and dominates book coverage.

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Antiracist Bestsellers

 

 

 

 

 

 

For a second week in a row, antiracist titles dominate the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list, the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list, and the USA Today Best-Selling Books list. As was the case last week, half of the top ten on the USA Today list are antiracist titles and there is only one book on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list that is not. Here are the top titles across the three lists:

How To Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (One World: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 1 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 2 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon): No. 1 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list and No. 2 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (Seal: Hachette; LJ starred review): No. 1 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 5 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (Nation): No. 3 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 8 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 4 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race by Beverly Daniel Tatum (Basic Books: Hachette): No. 4 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 14 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson (Spiegel & Grau: Random House; LJ starred review): No. 5 on the NYT Paperback Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 10 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor by Layla F. Saad (Sourcebooks; LJ starred review): No. 10 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (The New Press): No. 13 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

New Title Bestsellers

Links for the week: NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers | NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers | USA Today Best-Selling Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

The Summer House by James Patterson, Brendan DuBois (Little Brown: Hachette). Debuts at No. 4 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 6 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Daddy's Girls by Danielle Steel (Delacorte Press: Random House). Opens at No. 5 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 7 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Tom Clancy Firing Point by Mike Maden (G.P. Putnam's Sons: Penguin). Claims No. 8 on the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list and No. 11 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

The Daughters of Erietown by Connie Schultz (Random House). Closes the NYT Hardcover Fiction Best Sellers list at No. 15.

Nonfiction

Countdown 1945: The Extraordinary Story of the Atomic Bomb and the 116 Days That Changed the World by Chris Wallace (Avid Reader: S. & S.). Opens at No. 2 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list and No. 4 on the USA Today Best-Selling Books list.

Our Time Is Now: Power, Purpose, and the Fight for a Fair America by Stacey Abrams (Henry Holt: Macmillan). Holds No. 7 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness by Austin Channing Brown (Convergent Books: Penguin; LJ starred review). Takes No. 12 on NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list.

The Deficit Myth: Modern Monetary Theory and the Birth of the People's Economy by Stephanie Kelton (PublicAffairs: Hachette). Closes the NYT Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers list at No. 13.

Antiracist Reading Lists, News, and Collection Development/RA Resources

NPR interviews Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People To Talk About Racism (Beacon). Also, an interview with William A. Darity, From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-First Century (Univ. of North Carolina).

EarlyWord’s June GalleyChat is posted. It focused on black authors and includes spreadsheets of titles mentioned in the chat and EarlyWord’s ongoing list of Upcoming Diversity Titles for LibraryReads Consideration.

Vox reports on #PublishingPaidMe.

The NYT “Inside the List” column focuses on Beverly Daniel Tatum, Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race (Basic Books: Hachette).

In the UK, all five of the big publishers promise “they will make more room for black authors and staff.” The Guardian reports.

Rolling Stone has a state of the moment feature by Ayana Mathis, The Twelve Tribes of Hattie (Vintage: Random House).

The L. A. Times writes “Want to fix the racial disparity in book advances? Pay assistants more.”

The Executive Committee of United for Libraries has voted “to rescind the Literary Landmark status of Beauvoir, the house of Confederate president Jefferson Davis.” Book Riot reports.

The state-wide Minnesota book club book will be A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota edited by Sun Yung Shin, with contributions by Taiyon Coleman (Minnesota Historical Society Pres). The StarTribune reports.

John Bolton And Other Book Reviews

Tidbits from John Bolton’s book are starting to hit the papers. The Washington Post reports that The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir (S. & S.) reveals “Trump asked Chinese President Xi Jinping to help him win the 2020 U.S. election.” The paper goes on to say the book is “the most substantive, critical dissection of the president from an administration insider so far … It portrays Trump as an ‘erratic’ and ‘stunningly uninformed’ commander in chief, and lays out a long series of jarring and troubling encounters between the president, his top advisers and foreign leaders.” There is also a take by David Ignatius. The NYT also has coverage of some of the revelations and a review headlined “John Bolton Dumps His Notes and Smites His Enemies.” The paper further has “Five Takeaways” from the book and more about the administration’s legal case to stop the book. NPR also has coverage and a review. The Intelligencer has a rundown of the situation, including experts thoughts that Bolton will not be allowed to keep any profits. ABC News has released parts of the first Bolton interview. Deadline has a summary.

Meanwhile, HuffPost reports that the forthcoming tell-all by Mary Trump, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man (S. & S.), will reveal Trump’s “‘appalling’ treatment of his father, Fred Trump, during the years he battled Alzheimer’s disease.”

Vanity Fair has a report on Trump’s publishing woes. The NYT notes that Simon & Schuster is leading the pack right now in Trump tell-all books.

In additional book reviews, the NYT reviews Exercise of Power: American Failures, Successes, and a New Path Forward in the Post-Cold War World by Robert M. Gates (Knopf; LJ starred review): “a lucid, constructive manual to pass on his hard-earned wisdom.”

Book Marks has “5 Reviews You Need to Read This Week.”

Briefly Noted

Shaun Tan makes history as “the first person of colour to win the Kate Greenaway medal” for Tales from the Inner City (Arthur A. Levine Books: Scholastic; SLJ starred review) writes The Guardian. The paper also has an interview with Tan. Also announced last night, Anthony McGowan wins the Carnegie medal for Lark (Barrington Stoke).

Author and Nobel laureate Amartya Sen wins the 2020 Peace Prize of the German book trade. Publishing Perspectives has details.

The finalists for the Firecracker Awards are announced. Lit Hub has a report.

The L.A. Times gathers “Six highly gift-worthy memoirs about — and for — dads.”

Buzzfeed picks “31 Brand New LGBTQ YA Books To Devour This Summer.” Also, “29 YA Books By Black Authors That Are So Compelling You'll Want To Read Them More Than Once.”

Book Riot offers “A Brief Guide to Grimdark Fantasy and Where to Start Reading It.”

“The Shortlist” gathers “Debut Novels Reveal the Fragility of Female Bonds.”

Andy Cohen is reading “summertime tales from leading writers.” Muse has details.

Lit Hub asks “Can There Actually Be an Escapist Summer Read in 2020?" Jezebel has an ode to summer reading.

CrimeReads offers “Queer True Crime: A Reading List.” Also, “Perry Mason and the Case of the Wildly Successful, Perpetually Restless Author.”

Bustle excerpts Party of Two by Jasmine Guillory (Berkley: Penguin).

The NYT runs the poem “Black Snow” by Carl Adamshick, selected by Naomi Shihab Nye.

Electric Lit prints "Moments Earlier" by Kate Doyle.

Entertainment Weekly excerpts The Department of Truth, written by James Tynion IV and illustrated by Martin Simmonds. There is also an excerpt of Loretta Little Looks Back: Three Voices Go Tell It by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney (Little Brown Books for Young Readers: Hachette). Lastly, a brief first look at Doctor Who: Time Lord Victorious #1.

Electric Lit writes “There Has Never Been a Better Time to Read Ursula Le Guin’s “Earthsea” Books.”

NPR interviews Michael T. Osterholm, Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs (Little, Brown Spark: Hachette).

Wayne Koestenbaum, Figure It Out: Essays (Soft Skull Press), answers the NYTBy the Book” questions.

The NYT has a report on the reopening of London bookstores.

The Guardian features the backstory to The Tashi books by Anna and Barbara Fienberg and Kim Gamble.

Michael Dirda continues his quest to gain control of his book collection. As detailed in The Washington Post.

Bob, the feline star of A Street Cat Named Bob has died. USA Today reports.

Authors on Air

Deacon King Kong by James McBride is headed to TV. Hulu is adapting Dopesick by Beth Macy. Catherine McKenzie’s You Can’t Catch Me is set for TV too. Sony’s Alex Rider series gets a second season.

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