Hank Phillippi Ryan Wins Best Novel Anthony Award for 'The Murder List' | Book Pulse

The Anthony Awards and The Barry Awards are announced. The Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Foundation announces the winners of its 2020 Legacy Awards. Michael Kleber-Diggs wins the 2020 Max Ritvo Poetry Prize. Bill Gates has a book forthcoming in February, How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and the Breakthroughs We Need. Some copies of A Time for Mercy by John Grisham contain printing errors. On the Come Up by Angie Thomas is headed to the movies. A teaser trailer is out for The Underground Railroad.

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Awards

The Anthony Awards are announced. File 770 reports.

The Barry Awards are announced.

The Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Foundation announces the winners of its 2020 Legacy Awards.

Michael Kleber-Diggs wins the 2020 Max Ritvo Poetry Prize.

The Center for Fiction announces the establishment of the Susan Kamil Award for Emerging Writers.  

Reviews

The NYT reviews The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X by Les Payne, Tamara Payne (Liveright: W. W. Norton; LJ starred review): “Malcolm’s presence is beautifully rendered, but “The Dead Are Arising,” which was ultimately completed by Payne’s daughter and principal researcher, Tamara Payne, is not a tribute or enshrinement of achievements. Instead, it reconstructs the conditions and key moments of Malcolm’s life, thanks to hundreds of original interviews with his family, friends, colleagues and adversaries. Nobody has written a more poetic account.” Also, A Place for Everything: The Curious History of Alphabetical Order by Judith Flanders (Basic Books: Hachette): “fascinating … rewards us with a fresh take on our quest to stockpile knowledge. It feels particularly relevant now that search engines are rendering old ways of organizing information obsolete.” Dark Archives: A Librarian's Investigation into the Science and History of Books Bound in Human Skin by Megan Rosenbloom (FSG: Macmillan): “art scholar, part journalist, part wide-eyed death enthusiast, Rosenbloom takes readers on her own journey to understand how and why human-skin books came to be. She is self-aware about the weirdness of her subject matter, but believes that we should lean into what makes us uncomfortable.” Max Jacob: A Life in Art and Letters by Rosanna Warren (W.W. Norton): “Warren wears many hats — translator, critic, chronicler — to resuscitate a richly contradictory figure and to give him a seat at the table.” The “Shortlist” focuses upon “Celebrating Strange Faces, Gorgeous Sentences and Circular Prose.”

NPR reviews Where the Wild Ladies Are by Aoko Matsuda, translated by Polly Barton (Soft Skull Press): “would make for great Halloween reading, although these aren't the same old horror stories you've encountered before — they're novel, shimmering masterworks from a writer who seems incapable of being anything less than original.”

The Washington Post reviews The Butterfly Effect: How Kendrick Lamar Ignited the Soul of Black America by Marcus J Moore (Atria: S. & S.): “More conversational than scholarly, it’s at its most effective when charting Lamar’s cultural awakening, prompted in part by a life-changing pilgrimage to South Africa and the death of Trayvon Martin, and the almost parallel rise of Black Lives Matter. It tries to be a lot of things — an artistic biography, a fan letter, an abbreviated history of West Coast hip-hop, an examination of Black art as a vehicle for resistance — and does most of them well.” Beneficence by Meredith Hall (David R. Godine): “a quiet, poignant look at one family’s tragedy-strewn trajectory.” Greenlights by Matthew McConaughey (Crown: Random House): “A great thing about “Greenlights” is that the persona never sounds like a put-on. The bad thing, though, is that he obviously wrote it himself and seems certain that in addition to being a memoirist he’s also a certified motivational speaker and, worse, a poet.”

Briefly Noted

Bill Gates has a book forthcoming in February, How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and the Breakthroughs We Need (Knopf). In other forthcoming book news, USA Today reports that Dutton is publishing a book by the cast of The West Wing, to be called What’s Next: A Citizen’s Guide to The West Wing. A publication date has not been announced.

The Washington Post has “Beyond ‘The Shining’: Let’s talk about our favorite scary stories that take us inside unusual hauntings,” from Silvia Moreno-Garcia and Lavie Tidhar.

Book Marks has “Five Great Books About the Korean Diaspora.” They are suggested by Caroline Kim, The Prince of Mournful Thoughts and Other Stories (Univ. Pittsburg).

The Washington Post offers “15 feel-good books guaranteed to lift your spirits.”

O: The Oprah Magazine picks “31 Best Thanksgiving Books to Celebrate the Holiday.”

Shelf Awareness reports that “At least some copies of A Time for Mercy by John Grisham contain printing errors so extensive that Doubleday has recalled copies and is replacing them.”

Reading Group Choices 2021: Selections for Lively Book Discussions is now out.

Stephen Curry talks about his book club with The Washington Post.

Entertainment Weekly’s print issue piece about “Agatha Christie's pop culture reign, 100 years after her first book,” is now online.

Voting is open for the Not the Booker Prize.

Bustle features Shit, Actually: The Definitive, 100% Objective Guide to Modern Cinema by Lindy West (Hachette).

USA Today features Matthew McConaughey and Greenlights (Crown: Random House).

Jezebel interviews Olivia Dade, Spoiler Alert (Avon: Harper; LJ starred review).

O: The Oprah Magazine interviews Emily M. Danforth, Plain Bad Heroines (William Morrow: Harper; LJ starred review).

Vanity Fair asks “Who Really Inspired Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca?

The Panorama Project publishes “Directory of Best Practices for Public Library Events.”

Tor.com prints stories from Breathe FIYAH flash fiction anthology.

The NYPL has acquired Arthur Miller's “Personal Study Library.”

The plan to turn the Dublin home in James Joyce’s "The Dead" into a hostel has been approved. The Guardian reports on the story and the backlash from authors such as Sally Rooney and Colm Tóibín.

Author Jeffrey Toobin has been "suspended by The New Yorker" and will "take time off from CNN." Deadline reports.

The NYT reports that The Hay Festival will no longer hold an event “in Abu Dhabi after one of its employees accused the United Arab Emirates’ minister of tolerance of sexual assault.”

Authors on Air

On the Come Up by Angie Thomas is headed to the movies. The Flight Attendant, based on the Chris Bohjalian book, will debut on HBO Max on Nov. 26. Hello, Goodbye and Everything in Between has rounded out its cast. the film adapts the novel by Jennifer E. Smith. Lastly, a report on the film Truman & Tennessee: An Intimate Conversation. Deadline reports.

NPR’s Fresh Air features H. W. Brands, The Zealot and the Emancipator: John Brown, Abraham Lincoln, and the Struggle for American Freedom (Doubleday: Random House).

NPR’s Short Wave features Randall Munroe, How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems (Riverhead: Penguin).

Fox News features Battle of Brothers: William and Harry – The Inside Story of a Family in Tumult by Robert Lacey (Harper).

A teaser trailer is out for The Underground Railroad, based on the book by Colson Whitehead. It will air on Amazon but a date has not been announced.

Disney+ has a special look at The Mandalorian, season two.

Matthew McConaughey, Greenlights (Crown: Random House), will be on Live with Kelly and Ryan this morning.

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