5 Under 35 First: All Honorees Are Women of Color | Book Pulse

The National Book Foundation names the 2020 5 Under 35 honorees. For the first time in 5 Under 35 history, all of the honorees are women of color. The Cundill History Prize shortlist is out. The longlists are announced for the Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize. Vanity Fair has a long piece about Skyhorse Publishing. The NYT offers some details about how they create the bestseller lists.

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Awards and Industry News

The National Book Foundation names the 2020 5 Under 35 honorees.

Milan Kundera wins the Franz Kafka prize.

The Cundill History Prize shortlist is out.

The longlists are out for the Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize.

Vanity Fair has a long piece about Skyhorse Publishing.

The NYT has an “Times Insider” piece that offers some details on how they create the bestseller lists, writing “The sales data that drives what books make the lists, and where they land within them, is sent by stores giant, tiny and in-between all across the country. It reflects the previous week’s Sunday-to-Saturday sales period, which stores begin to report to us over the weekend. We receive numbers on millions of titles each week from tens of thousands of storefronts and online retailers as well as specialty and independent bookstores.”

Reviews

NPR reviews Can't Even: How Millennials Became the Burnout Generation by Anne Helen Petersen (HMH): “it bears noting that better research and prioritization would have strengthened Can't Even as both a portrait of burnout and a call for solidarity. Still, the book is effective, if imperfect, in both roles, and its flaws may serve to invite more writers into the necessary conversation Petersen has begun.”

The NYT reviews White House, Inc.: How Donald Trump Turned the Presidency into a Business by Dan Alexander (Portfolio: Penguin): “recounts some of the better known financial scandals involving the Trump family business from the past few years.” The Book of Unconformities: Speculations on Lost Time by Hugh Raffles (Pantheon: Random House): “a consummately “unstable and intimate energy-space,” and among the most mysterious books I’ve ever read — a dense, dark star.” Conditional Citizens: On Belonging in America by Laila Lalami (Pantheon: Random House): “best when Lalami turns inward.”

The Washington Post reviews Where Law Ends: Inside the Mueller Investigation by Andrew Weissmann (Random House): “a gift — a clarifying piece of history, wrapped up in our era’s boundless anger and suspicion.” Also, The Book of Two Ways by Jodi Picoult (Ballantine: Random House): “a return for Picoult to the themes of her earliest books — motherhood, complicated romantic love — when she did not build tension in a courtroom or hospital. Picoult, at this point in her career could skillfully build tension in a broom closet, but the best part of this book is not the suspense; it’s the look at the complexity of a woman as she enters middle age.” A Girl is A Body of Water by Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi (Tin House: W.W. Norton): “blazing … glorious.”

The L.A. Times reviews Troubled Blood by Robert Galbraith (Mulholland Books: Hachette): “even more dismaying is that the cross-dressing psychopath is among the least egregious stereotypes in this deeply troubled new entry in the Cormoran Strike series.”

Briefly Noted

Lit Hub picks 19 books for the week.

BuzzFeed also picks books for the week.

Book Marks offers “10 New and Forthcoming Books in Translation.”

CrimeReads selects “Five Debut Novels You Should Read in September.” Also, “Ten Golden Age Detective Novelists Who Deserve to Be Better Known.”

The Guardian names its “Top 10 books about social media.”    

Electric Lit offers “Classic Queer Books You Might Have Missed.”

Datebook lists “3 poetry anthologies deliver the wisdom and beauty we desperately need.”

The NYT has its New & Noteworthy column out for “Poetry, From the Ancient Greeks to Billy Collins.”

In forthcoming news, Tor.com writes a bit about A Psalm for the Wild-Built by Becky Chambers (Tordotcom: Macmillan).

Entertainment Weekly features the forthcoming Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid (Ballantine: Random House). Also, a small piece on the forthcoming You Love Me by Caroline Kepnes (Random House).

Bitch Media pushes back on Anne Helen Petersen’s Can't Even: How Millennials Became the Burnout Generation (HMH), writing “Which Millennials Get to Be Burned Out?Esquire has an interview with Petersen.

USA Today features God-Level Knowledge Darts: Life Lessons from the Bronx by Desus & Mero (Random House).

Shondaland and Bustle feature Sunny Hostin, I Am These Truths: A Memoir of Identity, Justice, and Living Between Worlds (HarperOne). Shondaland also interviews David Chang, Eat a Peach: A Memoir (Clarkson Potter: Random House).

Entertainment Weekly spotlights Ayesha Curry, The Full Plate: Flavor-Filled, Easy Recipes for Families with No Time and a Lot to Do (Voracious: Hachette). Also, an excerpt of Friends: The Official Cookbook by Amanda Yee (Insight: S. & S.).

People spotlights Bishop Michael Curry and Love is the Way: Holding on to Hope in Troubling Times (Avery: Penguin).

USA Today features Channel Kindness: Stories of Kindness and Community by Lady Gaga and the Born This Way Foundation Reporters (Feiwel & Friends: Macmillan).

Jezebel interviews Eula Biss, Having and Being Had (Riverhead: Penguin).

Authors on Air

NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Laila Lalami, Conditional Citizens: On Belonging in America (Pantheon: Random House). NPR’s Fresh Air interviews Dan Alexander, White House, Inc.: How Donald Trump Turned the Presidency into a Business (Portfolio: Penguin). NPR’s All Things Considered interviews Allie Brosh, Solutions and Other Problems (Gallery: S. & S.; LJ starred review). NPR’s Code Switch interviews Farah Jasmine Griffin, a professor who teaches African American literature at Columbia University, about reading and her Introduction to African American Literature class.

Fox features The Good Fight: Wanting to Leave, Choosing to Stay, and the Powerful Practice for Loving Faithfully by Jana Kramer, Michael Caussin (HarperOne).

Supergirl will end after season six on the CW. Deadline reports.

Tor.com reports that “Saga Press is bringing us a state of the union address about the world of sci-fi next week” with an online event focused on “how the genre fared in 2019” featuring authors from The Year's Best Science Fiction Vol. 1: The Saga Anthology of Science Fiction 2020 edited by Jonathan Strahan (Gallery/Saga: S. & S.).

Desus & Mero, God-Level Knowledge Darts: Life Lessons from the Bronx (Random House), will be on The View today.

A new trailer is out for Over The Moon, which is based on a Chinese myth. It airs on Oct. 23. Tor.com has some details.

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